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High School Afhkte 



CAVERNA HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION-1961 




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(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't Coach Chapman, Grider, Moore, Rogers, 
Campbell, Doyle, Coach Dorsey. Second Row : Mgr. Percell, Strickland, D. Logs- 
don, Ford, Lindsey, G. Logsdon, C. Logsdon, Branstetter, Toohey, Gentry. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

AUGUST ISBI 



.jr^ 




Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 19-20, 1961 

Flaget High School Track Team—K. H. S. A. A. Champion 1961 




(Left lo KikIUi Ir.ilit Ki>» . htanton. I'orlfr. Hansford. Dusth. Moorehead. hnust. Danner. .SpaldinK. Wilsun. 
Hilebrand Second Row: Sellinger. Baylor, Vessels,, Do»ns. Jauernik, Jones, Landrum, Weber, Dugan. Third Row: 
Coach Sartini. Alexander, Maxwell, Williams, Schuler, Washington. Buckman, Bouchard. McReynolds. Ass't Coach 
Bro. Kirby. 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Brown-Campbellsville 

2. MagTiire-Somerset 

3. Schmidt-Trinity 

4. Richards-Tilghman 

5. Cogswell-St. Xavier 

Time: 14.7 

Brown set a new state record of 14.7 



100 Yard Dash— 

1. Alexander-Flaget 

2. Moore-Manual 

3. Arthur-Ashland 

4. Martin-Fern Creek 

5. Wells-Madisonville 



220 Yard Dash— 

1. Alexander-Flaget 

2. Arthur-Ashland 

3. Bannister-Paris 

4. Dapper-Highlands 

5. Ballard-Daviess Co. 

Time: 10.0 Time: 22.2 



Mile Relay — 

1. Shawnee 

2. St. Xavier 

3. Highlands 

4. Trinity 

5. Tilghman 



(N. 



Time: 3:27 

w Record) 



Shot Put— 

1. Carter-Butler 

2. Fawns-Mt. Sterling 

3. Lindsey-Bowling Green 

4. Moorman-St. Xavier 

5. Gahm-St. Xavier 

Distance: 57' 
Carter set a new state record of 57' 



91/4" 
9%" 



180 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Brown-Campbells ville 

2. Reed-M.M.I. 

3. Maguire-Somerset 

4. Smith-Seneca 

5. Crawford-K.M.I. 

Time: 



20.4 



440 Yard Dash— 

1. Moss-Douglass 

2. Dawson-Holmes 

3. Ross-Highlands 

4. Hodgetts-Henry Clay 

5. Brown-Central 

Time: 50.7 



Mile Run — 

1. Owens-Trinity 

2. Banks-Elizabethtown 

3. Elliott-Butler 

4. Vetter-St. Xavier 

5. Broyles-Somerset 

Time: 4: 

Pole Vault — 

1. Taylor- A therton 

2. Martin-Lafayette 

2. Jennings-Holmes 

3. Schuette-Henderson City 

4. Funderbuck-Greensburg 

Height: 11' : 



Broad Jump — 

1. Gay-Clark Co. 

2. Alexander-Flaget 

3. Brown-Campbellsville 

4. Ross-Highlands 

5. Phillips-Henderson Co. 
Distance: 22' 7" 

Yard Run — 

1. Mathis-Waggener 

2. Gallagher-Lexingtin Cath. 

3. Bowden-Fulton 

4. Baker-Trinity 

5. Banks-Elizabethtown 
Time: 1:56.9 

his set a new state record of 1:56.9 

Yard Relay— 

1. Flaget 

2. Manual 

3. Trinity 

4. Tilghman 

5. Seneca 
Time: 1:31.5 

(Continued on Page Four) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1961 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Kentucky, July 12, 1961 
Ml-. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir; 

Pursuant to instructions received we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC .'ASSOCIATION for the period of one year be- 
ginning July 1, 1960, and ending June 30, 1961. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the 
Receipts and Disbursements, which in our opinion, reflect the 
true financial condition of the Association as of June 30, 1961. 
The cash funds on hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your 
depositories. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 
Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FLOWER & COMPANY 
By Huet L. Johnson 
202 Fincastle Building 
Louisville 2. Kentucky 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
.4.THLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1961, TO JUNE 30, 1961 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checkinff Account July 1. 1960 $ 11.634.04 

Annual Dues: 433 ai S3.00 $ 1,305.00 

Officials" Dues: 

Football: 430 la S3.00 1,290.00 

Basketball: 1202 w $3.00 3,606.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Football: 29 r<r Jl.OO 29.00 

Basketball: 34 T, $1.00 34.00 

Officials' Fines: 22 li: $5.00 110.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks made good) 30.00 

Advertising in Magazine 1,445.00 

Sale of Publications 341.80 

Sale of Matured Bond 1,035.00 

Ticket Sales-Annual Meeting 294.00 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1.326.00 
Interest Received from 1st. Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n 300.00 

Interest received from Union Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n 273.33 

Transferred from Union Fed. Loan Ass'n 

Savings Account 5,000.00 

Transferred from 1st Fed. Savings & 

Loan Ass'n 5,000.00 

Short-Term Loan (First National) 10.000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 104,532.14 

Refunds 421.19 

Receipts-State Baseball Tournament 710.00 

Sales Tax-State Ba,sketball Tournament ._ 3,980.65 
Football Playoffs: 

A & AA Ticket Sales 8.307.50 

Program Profit 538.75 

Receipts-State Track Meet 655.00 $150,564.36 

$162,198.40 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 4,842.36 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $11,000) 8,044.40 

Expense —Commissioner's Office 289.94 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $8,500) 6,854.50 

Travel Expense — As.s't Commissioner 842.11 

Clerical Help 5,364.55 

Janitor Service 935.82 

Postage 1,715.94 

Office Supplies 513.70 

Janitor Supplies 30.30 

Purchase of New Equipment 184.24 



45.40 

Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts 646.87 

Building Repairs 16.29 

Payment of Short Term Loan & Interest 10,087.50 

Utilities 905.24 

Telephone and Telegraph 1,531.54 

Fidelity Bonds 44.20 

Printing 2,479.38 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Charity Ass'n 500.00 

Appropriation to K. A. P. O. S. 200.00 

Purchase of National Federation Publications 1,928.47 

Delegates to National Federation Meetings 2,684.76 

National Federation Dues 120.75 

Girls Division — NSGWS 300.00 

Contribution — - Naismith Memorial Basketball 

Hall of Fame 1,000.00 

Rental on Films 451.00 

Audit 50.00 

Bad Checks 36.00 

Meals — ■ Annual Banquet 1,889.93 

Speaker — Annual Banquet 50.00 

Taxes and Witholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld $ 3,834.08 

Social Security 1,091.42 

City Income Tax Withheld 413.97 

Stale Income Tax Withheld 601.44 

Hospitalization Withheld 221.50 

Retirement Fund Withheld 800.00 

Sales & Use Tax 4,328.93 11,291.34 

Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Accounts 10,000.00 

Insurance Subsidy 10,795.00 

Magazine: 

Printing and Engravings 4,309.59 

Mailing 125.00 4,434.59 

Officials' Division : 

Honorariums and Expenses — Clinics 1.146.15 

Printing and Miscellaneous Expense 84.18 

Schools for Officials 1,074.19 

Expenses — Regional Basketball 

Clinics 173.06 

Officials' Emblems 386.01 2,863.59 

Swimming: 

State Committee Expense $ 346.44 

Trophies and Medals (State Meet)__ 382.46 

Officials (State Meet) 211.00 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 2,820.70 $ 3,760.60 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 802.49 

Trophies and Awards 678.82 

Miscellaneous Expenses 60.00 1,541,31 

Tennis : 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 626.57 

Trophies and Balls 1,579.10 

Expenses — Tournament Managers-- 205.20 2,410.87 

Track : 

Regional Expense 412.42 

Trophies and Medals 1,671.41 

State Committee Expense 1,024.57 

Officials 526.16 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 7,344.30 

New Equipment 362.47 

State Clinic 94.60 11,435.93 

Baseball : 

Refunds on District Tournament 

Deficits 2,220.71 

Trophies and Awards 2,266.62 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 434.81 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 87.69 

Transportation (State Tournament) 607.20 

(Continued on Page Three) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Aug-ust, 1961 VOL. XXIV— NO. 1 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hiirh School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication. Le.xington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62). Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1969-63). Georgetown 

Directors— Jack Dawson (1968-62), Louisville; Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63), Browder : Preston Holland (1961-66). Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65). Danville; Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64), Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates .$1.00 Per Year 

Jt'iom the Commissioned s Cyjjice 

Football Clinics 

The 1961 clinics for football officials will 
be conducted by Athletic Director Ed'^ar 
McNabb, Assistant Principal of the Beech- 
wood High School, South Fort Mitchell. Mr. 
McNabb has been the K.H.S.A.A. represen- 
tative on the National Federation Football 
Committee for several years. The dates and 
sites of the clinics are as follows : August 13, 
Ashland, 8:00 P.M.; August 14, Pikeville 
High Sdhool, 8:00 P. M. ; Auigust 15, Bell 
County High School, Pineville, 8:00 P.M.; 
August 20, Bowling Green, 8:00 P.M.; Aug- 
ust 21, Mayfield High School, 8:00 P.M.; 
August 22, Henderson High School, 8:00 
P. M. ; August 27, Newport High School, 8:00 
P. M., August 28, University Higlh School, 
Lexington, 8 :0O P. M. ; August 29, Louisville 
8:00 P.M. 

Registration of Officials 

Football and basketball officials previously 
registered have received their renewal ap- 
plication cards for the 1961-62 school year. 
One hundred eighty-six officials failed to 
file their 1960-61 reports on or before the 
dep.dline set by the Board of Control for 
the submitting of reports, and it was neces- 
sary to impose fines on these officials who 
failed to comply with Association rules. It 
is an Association requirement that each 
registered official attend the clinic in the 
sport in which he is registered. Sixteen foot- 
ball officials and eighty basketball officials 
were suspended in 1960-61 for failure to 
attend clinics. 

New Officers 
On July 22, 1961, the Board of Control 
elected W. H. Crowdus and Kenneth G. Gill- 
aspie President and Vice-President respec- 
tively of the K.H.S.A.A. V\^rite-ups of the 
new officers will appear in the September 
issue of the ATHLETE. 



NEW BOARD MEMBER 




Preston Holland 

Athletic Director Preston "Ty" Holland of 
the Murray High School will represent Sec- 
tion 1 on the Board of Control for a four-year 
period, beginning July 1, 1961. Mr. Holland 
will be a new member of the Board, replac- 
ing Supt. Louis Litchfield of the Crittenden 
County Schools who was not eligible for re- 
election after having served two successive 
terms. Preston Holland was born in Mur- 
ray, Kentucky. He attended the Murray 
Grade School and High School, graduating 
in 1924. He received his A.B. Degree from 
Murray State College four years later, after 
having lettered in football, basketball, and 
baseball. He has done graduate work at the 
University of Kentucky, and he received his 
M. A. Degree from Murray State. 

The new Board member was principal and 
coach at Almo High School for two years fol- 
lowing his graduation from college, after 
which he joined the Murray staff as coach 
of football, basketball, baseball, and track. 
He has been at Murray since that time, cur- 
rently being Athletic Director and Head 
Football Coach. He is Past President of the 
Murrav State Alumni Association. He or- 
ganized the first Little League in Kentucky, 
serving as State Director for several years. 
For manv years he has been a Deacon in the 
First Christian Church of Murray and he 
now serves as Sunday School Superintendent 
at that church. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Three 



AUDIT 



(Continued from Page One) 



Tour 



Meals (State 
Ticket Sellers and 

Tournament) ___ 
Lodging (State Tour 
tJmpires (State Tour 
Expenses — Ass't Ma 

Tournament) __ 

State Clinic 

Grounds Men (State 



Tournament) 



60.00 
560.30 
235.00 

60.00 
131.00 
30.00 



nt Fu 



K. H. S. A. A. Retii 

Cross Countrv: 

Mileage and Local Entertainii 

(State Meet) 

Trophies and Awards 

Expenses — Regional Meets __ 
Miscellaneous Expenses 



Football Plavoffs: 
Printing _ 



657,30 
406.23 

44.18 1.130.08 



Trophies and Awards 

Transportation 

Lodging 

Meals 

Field Rental 

Officia's 

Ticket Sellers, Takers & Guards 



Mil 



ella 



P. A. Announcer & Scoreboard. 

Regional Deficits 

Public Liability Insurance 

Footballs & Equipment 

Statisticians 



64.07 

767.56 

620.00 

497.60 

929.00 

155.39 

255.00 

151.00 

110.00 

25.00 

231.64 

39.00 

46.10 

32.64 



Total Dishu 

Receipts 

Disbursements 



Bala 



Cash Balance 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

ice per Bank Statement, June 30, 1961 
.ess Outstanding Checks: 

No. 765 $ 14.44 

No. 896 48.00 

No. 899 3,980.65 

58.00 

30.00 

19.50 

16.55 

127.49 

103.44 



___$129,622.03 

^$1(52.198.40 
_ 129,622.0.3 

_$ 32,576.37 

___$ 36,964.44 



No. 


900 


No. 


913 


No. 


916 


No. 


917 


No. 


918 



No. 919 



4.388.07 



True Bank Balance .Tune 30. 1961 $ 32,576.37 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance — First Security National 

Bank & Trust Co. $ 32,,576..37 

U. S. Savin-is Bonds (Value June 30, 

1961) 48,179.30 

Savings Account — 1st Fed. Savings & 

Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Savings Account — Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1961 $100,7.5.5.67 

Estimated Value of K. H. S. A. A, Building 

and Equipment $ 98,788.60 

RECE'PTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1981 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $139,498.25 

Profit on Program 3,310.00 $142,808,25 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 1,108.91 

Trophies and Awards 693.96 

Postage 200.00 

Public Liability Insurance 613.80 

Incidental Expense — (16) Teams 8.000.00 

Transportation 1,272.10 

Lodging 4,831.88 

Meals 7,161.92 

Taxi Service for Teams 90.00 

Coliseum Rental 3,000.00 

Organist 65.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1,623.38 

Scorers and Timers 480,00 



Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians __ 265.00 

Ushers 300.00 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers, and 

Guards 1.782.00 

Public Address Announcers 180.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 65.58 

Films 350.00 

Towel Service 60.60 

Honorariums and Expenses — 

Ass't Tour, Managers 1,329.83 

Bad Checks 47.50 

State Sales Tax 3,980.65 

Detective Service 774.00 $ 38.276.11 



LOW SCORE GOLFERS 




(Left to Right): Tom Parkhill (K.M.I.) state champion: 
Rob Spragens (Lebanon) and Joe Lenahan (Trinity) who 
tied for second place; Brig. Gen. Evert S. Thomas, deputy 
commanding general of the Armor Center, Fort Knox. 

WAGGENER GOLF TEAM WINS STATE 
TOURNAMENT 

The Waggener High School of Louisville won the 1961 
State High School Golf Tournament, held at the Fort Knox 
Lindsey Golf Course on May 23-24. with a score of 651. The 
Seneca High School was second with 656. Other team scores 
were: Scottsville. 676; Owensboro, 678; St. Xavier. 682; 
Beechwood. 685 ; Owensboro Catholic. 691 ; Lafayette 697 ; 
Frankfort, 702 : Atherton. 702 ; St. Joseph, 705 ; College High, 
722 ; Ashland. 730 ; and Middlesboro, 734. The tournament 
was managed by Athletic Director John W, Hackett of the 
Fort Knox High School. 

Tom Parkhill, a 15 year-old sophomore from Kentucky 
Military Institute came out best in a four-way battle for 
the individual championship. His score was 152. Joe Lenahan 
of Trinity and Rob Spragens of Lebanon tied for second 
with a score of 154, with Lenahan winning the playoff. Ron 
Acree of Waggener was third with 157. 

Winners in the Driving, Chipping, and Putting contests 
were as follows :Driving — Steve Lyles, Scottsville, 256 yards ; 
chipping — Ed Luxon, Madison-Model ; putting — Sandy 
Edinger, Seneca, 

Individual scores of some of the tournament leaders are 
as follows: 

1 .52 -Parkhill (K.M.I.) 

154 — Lenahan (Trinity); Spragens (Lebanon) 

157 — Acree (Waggener) 

159— Lyles (Scottsville) ; Johnson (Pleasure Ridge Park) 

160— Munz (Fern Creek) 

161 — Hoagland (Owensboro); Denham (Seneca) 

162— Edinger (Seneca) ; Roby (St. Xavier) ; Mullen (Paducah 
Tilghman) 

(Waggener) ; Lei.ion (Atherton) ; Olyniec (St. 



(Beechwood); Doll (Good Shepherd); Burrice 



(Waggener) ; Morrison (Cov. 



163— Scher 
Joseph) 

164 — Auge 
(Waggener) 

165— Boldr 

166 -Johns 
Sickles (Scottsville) 

167 — Dabney (Se 
ington Catholic ) 

168— Conway (Frankfort) ; Meyers (Scottsville) 

169— Rogan (Middlesboro) ; Newton (Fulton) ; Coy (Old- 
ham County) 

170— Russell (University High) ; Hite (Lexington Catholic) ; 
Paul (Lafayette) ; Clark (College High) ; Stinnett (Owensboro) 

171— Lyons (St. Henry) ; Brown (Owensboro) ; Bentley 
(Boyd County) ; Long (Frankfort) 

172 — Westerfield (Owensboro Catholic) ; Collier (Lafayette) ; 
Black (Elizabethtown) ; Faught (Glasgow). 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Twenty-Ninth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 15 - 16, 1961 

SINGLES 



Cooper - St. Xavier 


[ Cooper 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

- Cooper 
6-0: 6-1 




Bye 


SEMI- 


Davis - St. Joseph 


Garth 
1 6-1; 6-1 


FINALS 


- Roberts 
6-3; 6-1 




Garth - Wagrgener 


Cooper k 


Roberts 
1 6-0; 6-1 




6-0 ; 6-1 


FINALS V. 


Roberts - Henry Clay 


McNerney 
6-2; 6-0 




Etherington - M.M.I. 




Tippen - Owensboro 


Tippen 
- 6-1 : 6-3 




McNerney 
6-0: 6-0 




Teague - Madisonville 


Cooper 


Anderson - Fort Knox 


Anderson 
6-1 ; 6-2 


6-3: 6-2 




Cox - University 




McNerney 
(forfeit) 








McNerney - Flaget 


Simms 
6-2: 6-2 




Bye 




Baldree 

- S-7 ; 6-1 ; 6-4 








Baldree - Hopkinsville 








Wade - Lafayette 


Kane 






Simms 




Bye 


Kane 

6-2: 6-2 


Cooper 


Simms - Bellevue 


Kane 




Kane - Trinity 










Ward 

5-7 : 6-2 :6-0 








Ward - Glasgow 


Evans 
6-1; 8-6 




Cost - Hopkinsville 




McConnell 
6-1; 6-4 












McConnell - Eastern 


Schad 
6-4; 6-1 


Schad 
6-1 : 6-1 




Harralson - Owensboro 




Evans 
6-3: 6-0 








Axton - Waggener 


Wills 
6-1 ; 6-3 




Evans-Berea 




Wills 
6-2: 6-1 








Wills - Atherton 






Bishop - University 






Barr ' 
6-0; 6-0 




Barr - Bellevue 


Schad 
6-0: 6-0 




Lovejoy - Henry Clay 




Wildt 
6-1 ; 6-4 








Wildt-Holmes 






Blackburn - Franklin Co. 




Bye 


Schad 




Schad-St. Xavier 





TRACK MEET— 

( Continued !from Inside Front Cover) 

Discus — 

1. Carter-Butler 

2. Berry-Highlands 

2. Overman-Belevue 

3. Williams-Henry Clay 
3. Carlisle-Warren Co. 

Distance: 147' 5" 
High Jump — 

1. Brown-Campbellsville 

2. Carwile- Valley 

3. Overman-Bellevue 

3. Wheeler-Henderson City 
3. Hensley-CIay Co. 
3. Martin-Lafayette 

Height: 6' SVs" 

Brown set a new state record of 6' 3W' 



TOTAL POINTS 

Flaget 27 

Campbellsville 21 

Trinity 21 

Highlands 18 

Butler 15 

St. Xavier 14 

Manual 12 

Shawnee 12 

Somerset 8 

Tilghman 8 

Holmes Ih: 

Ashland 7 

Atherton 6 

Clark Co 6 

Douglass 6 

Waggener 6 

Elizabethtown 5 

Lafayette 5 



Bellevue 4% 

Lexington Catholic 4 

M. M. I 4 

Mt. Sterling 4 

Seneca 4 

Valley 4 

Henderson City 3% 

Henry Clay 3V2 

Bowling Green 3 

Fulton 3 

Paris 3 

Fern Creek 2 

Clay Co. 

Warren Co. 1% 

Central 

Daviess Co. 

Greensburg 

Henderson Co. 

K. M. L 

Madisonville 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Five 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 

June 7 - 8, 1961 



Eelfry (1) 




Lafayette (2) 


Caverna (1) 










Lafayette (12) 


Caverna (5) 










Caverna (3) 


Waggener (0) 










Owensboro (1) 


Waggener (2) 


Caverna — 






Champion 


Mayfield (0) 




Waggener (4) 




Newport Catholic (1) 






(2) 




Newport Catholic 






Wheelwright (1) 









Second Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 12 - 13, 1961 
SINGLES 



QUARTER- 



SuUivan-Waggener 


Sullivan 
6-0; 6-0 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Sullivan 
6-3; 6-0 


FINALS 

Sullivan 
6-2; 6-0 




Clark-University 
Strickler-Danville 




Lauffer 
6-0; 6-2 


- 


Levison 
6-1; 7-5 




Lauffer-Owensboro 




- Pruitt 
6-2; 6-4 








Pruitt-Eastern 
J. Schey-Southern 


Schey 
6-4; 6-3 




Levison 
6-1; 5-7; 6-1 




Levison-Central 


Steilberg 
6-l;7-5 




Hobson-Atherton 


Steilberg 
(forfeit) 


Sullivan 
6-2; 6-0 


Steilberg-Presentation 








Smith-Henderson City 


Nelson 
6-0; 6-0 








Nelson-Franklin Co. 


Schey 
7-5; 6-4 




Harned-Manual 


Galloway 
6-1; 6-2 




Gslloway-Owensboro 






Thoney-Bellevue 


_ 

Schey 
1 6-4; 6-4 




M. Schey-Southern 










Rice-Hopkinsville 


1 





Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

This Dutchman has attended many con- 
ventions, but none which was more enjoyable 
or better conducted than the one put on by 
the National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Association at French Lick, Indiana, 
in July. 

Cliff Fagan, Dave Arnold and associates 
got this job done beautifully. Colonel L. V. 
Phillips, I.H.S.A.A. Commissioner, again 
proved himself an able leader, giving this 
convention the required local leadership nec- 
essary to make it "chck." 

This is a clean affair. The conduct of the 
athletic leaders of the nation reflected credit 
on the athletic programs of the various state 
high school athletic associations. Commis- 
sioners, assistant commissioners, executive 
secretaries, and members of their boards of 
control make a fine family affair of this 
convention bringing their wives and children. 
If you have never attended one of these con- 
ferences, plan to. You will be proud of the 
program plus the men who administer it for 
our young people. 

Everybody seemed to be at French Lick! 
From the hills of Tennessee there emerged 
Webb Porter, one of the finest sports 
officials ever to blow a whistle in the South 
now an assistant commissioner. Commission- 
er Oden Hawes, who served time with the 
Dutchman on the National Basketball Rules 
Committee, strayed from the Oregon Trail 
to be present. Herman Keller was there from 
Evansville as was "Jolly Cliff" Harper of 
Alabama. Personable Milt Sprunger of Illi- 
nois added zest to the occasion as did Iowa's 
dynamic Lyle Quinn. 

Kentucky's Ted Sanford and Joe Billy 
Mansfield led a colorful array of our "Hill 
Williams" (all wearing shoes) in the persons 
of Bob Forsythe, Jack Dawson, Kenny Gil- 
laspie, Louie Litchfield, Oran Teater, Cecil 
Thornton, Paul Trimble, Harold Craig, and 
Russ Williamson. These Kentuckians were 
"griped" when the Dutchman and Harold 
Craig took on the New Jersey delegation of 
Dany Testa, Leo Zotta, and Frank Pingitore 
in an inter-state golf match on the Fourth of 
July and lost. They felt better the next day 
when it was our turn to keep the score. 

Paintsville's Oran Teater set some kind 
of a recoi'd at French Lick when he created 
the first inland tidal wave, when he dived 
in the pool, swamping Jack Dawson and Paul 
Trimble. 

Russ Williamson of Inez, one of the 
shrewedest coaches Kentucky will ever pro- 




Little Charmer Posing 



duce, spent a lot of time courting a cute little 
six-month old charmer, Becky Lynn Craig. 
Attention, Coach Briscoe Inman of Centre 
College! Becky is the daughter of Harold 
Craig who played half back for you in the 
late fifties — and The Dutchman's grand- 
daughter. The delegates and their wives un- 
officially adopted Becky as "The Convention 
Mascot." 




Board Member Posing 

Every convention will do well to copy the 
recreation page for wives from the program 
of this National Federation Meeting. Recep- 
tions were scheduled as were coffee hours, 
fashion shows, cha-cha lessons, dancing in 
the lobby, tours, surrey rides, and sports of 
all kinds. These Federation men know how 
to operate. 

Now it's time for the annual August 
School For Basketball Officials sponsored 
for the thirteenth consecutive year in Lex- 
ington. Sixteen key officials from the regions 
of Kentucky will work on mechanics of of- 
ficiating on August 13 and 14. 

September will find The Dutchman con- 
ducting the annual state-wide basketball 
training program for officials for Colonel L. 
V. Phillips of the I.H.S.A.A. in Indianapolis, 
after which come the October basketball 
clinics of the K.H.S.A.A. These will take 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Seven 



TENNIS DOUBLES— BOYS 



St. Xavier 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

St. Xavier 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

St. Xavier 
6-1; 6-1 




Bye 
Owensboro 


Owenslioro 
6-2; 6-2 




University 
6-4; 8-10; 6-4 






St. Xavier 


M. M. I. 


University 
7-5; 2-6; 6-3 


6-1; 6-2 


Hopkinsville 


Trinity 
6-0; 10-8 




University 


Henry Clay 
6-3; 6-4 




Highlands 


Trinity 
6-3; 6-3 


Henry Clay 
Trinity 


Trinity 
6-1; 6-4 




Danville 


K. M. I. 
6-2; 6-3 


Fort Knox 


Bellevue 
6-3; 6-2 


K. M. I. 


Flaget 
6-1; 6-1 




Flaget 
Madisonville 




Bellevue 




Bye 
Bellevue 







St. Xavier 
6-4; 6-3 



place at fifteen locations over Kentucky, and 
will add 2,000 miles to The Dutchman's 
speedometer. Almost forgot to mention that 
Commissioner Charlie Greswold of Hawaii 
wants The Dutchman to put on the clinics in 
the Islands. 

As our schoolboy sports program opens 
with the autumn air filled with footballs, 
please keep in mind that you make the Fly- 
ing Dutchman Projects what they are — so 
will you remember to 

1. Send us your news items. 

2. Look for unselfish individuals to rec- 
ommend for the Corn Cob Pipes of Honor. 

3. Interest yourself in a pihysically-handi- 
capped youngster and get him interested in 
sports. 

4. Work for the promotion of good neigh- 
bor practices between the schools of Ken- 
tucky and the Abou Ben Adhem awards. 

The Corn Cob Pipe of Honor award goes 



ST. XAVIER'S CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 




(Left to Right): Jackie Cooper, state singles champion; 
Mickey Schad and Bobby Cooper of the state championship 



this month to Ed Fox, Commissioner of 
Parks, Frankfort. Eddie is "racking up" an 
enviable record in State Parks work, and is 
giving unselfishly of himself so that some of 
the finer things life has to offer may be 
available to Kentuckians. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Waggener 



Atherton 



Bye 



Franklin Co. 



Highlands 



Owensboro 



Bye 



TENNIS DOUBLES— GIRLS 



QUARTER- 
FINALS 



SEMI- 
FINALS 



FINALS 





Waggener 


Waggener 
P-0: 6-2 






Hazel Green 
6-2; 6-3 




Shawnee 




Hopkinsville 
(forfeit) 






Waggener 


Hazel Green 


Hopkinsville 


6-0; 6-2 


Hopkinsville 




Bye 


Henderson City 


Henderson City 




1 


Bye 





Franklin Co. 
6-2; 6-4 



Atherton 
6-2; 6-4 



Owensboro 



Assumption 



Owensboro 
6-3; 3-6; 6-2 



Atherton 
6-1; 6-3 



Atherton 
6-1: 7-5 



Bye 



Assumption 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



on basketball 

S. A. A. during, 19(50-61. 

represent respectively the 

and Poor ratings given to 



The following ratings wen 
officials registered with the K. H 
The numbers following each nam* 
number of Excellent, Good, Fair, 
the official. 

Abernathy. George R., 13-20-2-3; Adkins, Raymond C, 
21-22-7-4; Adkins, Wendell L., 8-0-1-0; Akins, Charlie, 1-11-0-0; 
.\kridge, Dean, g-27-5-2 ; Alexander, Donald, 1-5-2-1 ; Alexander, 
Rex E.. 12-17-0-0; Alford, William C, 0-2-.3-0 : Allen, Jack R., 
0-9-1-1; Allen, Lowry E., 15-32-1-3; Allen, Nelson R., 34-34-6-6; 
Almon, James H.. 2-9-2-0; Arnold, Kenneth 57-40-2-0. 

Babbage, Don R., 0-1-1-0 ; Back, Bill, 2-6-3-1 ; Barker, 
James E., 21-24-3-0; Baker, Robert M., Jr., 3-2-2-0; Ball. Del- 
bert, 2-7-1-0; Ballaban, Thomas, 1-4-3-0; Ballard, Jack H., 
8-10-3-0 ; Ballinger, Richard L., 0-6-10-3 ; Bankemper, Thomas, 
1-6-0-0: Barker. Walter D., 0-8-1-1 ; Barlow, Bill R. (Lexington), 
3-18-2-1: Barlow, Billy (Paris), 4-3-5-0; Barry, Harold L., 
0-4-0-0 ; Barton, Walter W., 1-12-1-0 ; Baskins, Sylvester, 1-7-1-0 ; 
Bates, Gardner, 2-11-2-2; Baughn, E. L. "Tug", 6-7-3-0; 
Beasley, Bobby, 0-2-0-0 ; Bell, Henry Burnett, 0-6-0-0 : Bell, 
Clarence T. (Louisvile). 5-7-2-3; Bell, Jimmy D. (Murray), 
0-1-0-0 : Benedict. Johnny, 17-4-1-0 ; Bennett, Bert A., 0-7-3-4 ; 
Bennett, Gene (Ohio), 1-7-1-0; Bentley, James, 1-2-0-0; 
Beringer, William F.. 0-2-0-0 ; Berry. William F., 1-0-0-1 ; 
Bibb. William 0., 12-14-1-1 ; Bickers, Homer G., 4-12-0-0 : 
Bishop, David G., 0-2-2-0; Black, Charles D. (Barbourville), 
20-15-1-1: Black, Clarence (W. Liberty), 17-17-5-2; Black, 
Robert N. (Clinton), 0-1-0-0: Black, William A. (Illinois), 
1-6-1-1; Blackburn, Adrian (P'burg), 0-6-0-2; Black, Tennyson 
R., 0-1-0-1: Blackburn, Viley O. (Somerset), 1-2-2-0; Blankenship, 
Zeb (Richmond), 0-3-2-1; Blevins, Boone, Jr., 1-1-0-0; Bocook, 
George. 0-1-0-0 ; Boehm. Robert R., 3-3-4-5 ; Boone. Billv R., 
1-5-4-1: Boone Winton E. (B.G.), 0-3-2-2: Borden, W. B. 
"Jack", 7-23-5-0; Bowlin, Bob, 1-2-3-0; Bowling, Ray, 0-0-2-0; 
Bowman. Earl G. "Dick". 6-15-0-1; Boyd, Jerry, 6-10-1-3: 
Boyles, Paul E., 8-18-4-4 ; Bradshaw, Bill, 5-19-2-1 ; Bradshaw, 



Frank, 0-4-0-0 : Branaman, Bill, Sr., 12-15-2-0 ; Braughler, 
David L.. 3-3-2-0 ; Breeden, Charles. 0-1-1-0 :Brenning, Stanley 
L., 3-0-1-0 : Brewer, Randell, 8-6-4-0 : Brichler, Joe A., 0-16-5-1 ; 
Bridges, Bennie E., 29-26-1-1 ; Brizendine, Vic, 36-24-3-0 ; 
Broderick, Carroll A., 15-29-0-1 : Brooks. James A., 9-12-3-3 ; 
Brown, Bryant, 6-14-3-0; Brown, E. C. (Liberty), 13-27-11-1; 
Brown, J. Carlton (Danville), 12-31-6-0; Brown, James A. 
(Hopkinsville I, 0-1-1-0: Brown, James W. (Richmond). 14-18-4-1; 
Brown, John W. (Lex.), 16-15-2-1; Brown, Thomas, (Cinn.), 
1-3-1-0: Browning. Wm. H. (Lebanon), 0-1-0-0: Brugh, Walter 
J., 3-16-1-1: Brummett, Joe (Danville), 22-23-3-1; Bruner, 
Jack C, 17-16-3-0 ; Brunson, Gary Wayne, 0-2-0-2 ; Buis, 
Nathaniel, 13-28-10-2 ; Bunn, Harold. 0-1-0-0 : Bunnell, K. L., 
6-10-7-3 : Bunting. John Louis, 0-3-0-2 ; Burchett, Lanier, 
J.. 6-0-0-0; Burns. Ronnie, 1-14-1-0; 
6-26-4-4 : Butcher, Paul, 0-6-0-0 ; 



rkhart. 



4-21-8. 

Butcher 

Butler, Donald A., 1-2-1-0 : Butner, W 

Delbert L., 1-2-0-0. 

Cain, Ronnie 
4-7-0-1 : Campbell, 
(Garrett). 15-18-2-1 
Thomas J., 0-7-1-0 : 

2-11-4-0; Cantrell, Hubert E., 1-6-0-1 
Carnes, Richard, 0-2-0-0 : Carpent 
Carroll, Joe E., 2-4-0-0 : Cartee, Ralph 
Randall E., 0-5-3-0 ; Cassady, Chi 



M., 0-8-5-2 ; Butts, 



(Lyndon), 0-1-0-0 
French. 6-28-2-1 
: Campbell, Lonr 
ady, Ray B. 



ell, 



D., 



Caldv 

Campbell, John Jr. 

ie. 0-1-1-2 : Champeau, 

10-7-2-2 : Canter, John, 

Caple, Harold, 0-2-0-0 : 

Leonard F., 24-15-1-0 ; 

■., 24-7-4-2: Cash, 

3-30-2-1 : Cassady, 

H., 



Richard, 6-26-3-1 ; Cassell, Curtis. 0-1-0-0 :Cates, Thomas 
0-6-3-0 ; Gathers, Bob. 6-7-0-1 ; Cathey, Gene S., 7-33-7-1 : 
Catlett, David L., 0-1-0-0 ; Cecil, John O., Jr., 6-4-6-3 : Chambers, 
Bill., 0-0-1-0 : Chambers, William V.. 2-9-1-0 ; Chaney, Bobby 
Lee, 0-3-0-0: Chaney, Rex, 5-2-3-3; Chappell, Joe, 6-11-0-1; 
Chattin, Charles, 16-13-4-4 : Clark, Owen B., 0-2-3-0 : Coffey, 
Kenneth B., 0-2-0-0 : Coleman, L. J., Jr. "Duke", 14-16-8-0 ; 
Colgan, Donald L., 8-6-2-2 ; Collins. Bob. 0-9-2-1 : Collins, 
Larry, 0-4-1-0: Combs, Keith Allen, 11-13-0-0: Combs, William 
E. Jr., 11-16-0-0 ; Conley, George D., 22-7-0-2 ; Conley, Ted. L., 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Nine 



7-15-4-0; Conley. Tom W.. 0-0-1-2; Conn, John D., 0-1-1-2; 
Connell, Jerry. 2-0-0-0 ; Cooper, Hewlett, 0-3-1-0 : Cooper, 
John Wellington, 7-9-2-0 ; Cooper, Warren, 33-8-0-0 ; Cornett, 
Billy J., 0-1-0-0 ; Cornett, John M., 0-3-0-0 ; Corrao, Philip 
J., 0-1-1-2 ; Cossey, James Zelner, O-l-O-O ; Courtney, Walt, 
2-7-4-0 ; Cox, Charles Glenn, 0-8-0-0 ; Cox, Ralph, 4-8-0-0 ; 
Cox, Rufus A., 2-10-1-0 ; Cox, William J., 0-6-0-0 ; Crabtree, 
Charles E., 0-1-0-0 ; Craft, Bill, 32-29-3-1 ; Crager, Bobby 
F., 1-0-0-0 ; Craig, John G., 2-2-1-0 ; Crank, Buck, 0-2-0-1 ; 
Crawford, Donald Ray, 1-7-6-1 : Crawford. Tom. 0-3-0-0 : 
Creech. Harvey J.. 0-4-0-0 ; Creekmore. Ken. 4-36-8-3 ; Crocetti, 
Dom, 0-1-0-0 ; Crosthwaite, John S.. Jr.. 4-0-0-0 ; Crutcher, 
James W.. 13-24-10-3 ; Culp. Willard E.. 2-7-0-0 ; Cummins, 
Albert B.. 4-10-9-2 ; Cummins. Curtis. 0-1-0-0 : Cummins, Ray, 
0-1-1-0 ; Cunningham, Julian R., 5-12-3-0 : Current, Ellis 
Ray, 4-12-6-0. 

Dalton, Ray H., 0-8-3-2 ; Dame. L. J.. 8-22-2-4 ; Damico. 
Ernie. 0-1-9-0 ; Daum. Charles A., 0-2-0-0 ; Davenport, Robert 
B., 3-15-2-1 ; Davenport, Sam C, Jr., 0-0-2-0 ; Davis, William 
"Bunny" 6-12-0-1 ; Davis, Webster C. "Curtis", 1-1-0-0 ; Davis, 
David A., 1-1-0-0 ; Davis. Donald. 8-19-3-0 : Davis, Dwight R.. 
Jr.. 0-1-0-0: Davis, Ralph E. 11-5-1-2; Davis, Harold T., 
3-13-1-2 ; Dawson, Alby L., 9-5-1-1 : Dawson, Ray R., 1-0-0-0 ; 
DeGroote, James, 1-1-0-0 ; DeMoisey, Fox, 14-34-6-1 ; De- 
Moisey. Truett R.. 13-30-3-3 : Demunbrun. Murphy M., 21-18-3-2 ; 
Denton, Charles M.. 0-2-0-0 ; DeVary, Bill "Blackie", 14-23-3-3 ; 
Dierolf, William H., Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Dieterle, Owen M., 0-1-0-0 ; 
DiMozie, Robert M., 10-15-4-0; Disken, Jim, 4-2-9-0; Dixie, 
Cornelius P., 0-3-0-0 ; Dixon, Charles T., 0-5-1-1 ; Dixon, 
Kenneth, 0-2-0-0 ; Dobson, Kenneth, 1-14-0-1 ; Dorsey, James, 
1-9-8-2 ; Dotson. John B., 2-0-0-0 ; Dotson, W. S., 1-9-0-0 ; 
Dowdy, Donald, 0-12-3-0 ; Drake, Neal M.. 0-5-0-1 ; Drake. 
Richard R., 18-25-4-0 ; Draugher, Bartram, 3-8-0-0 ; Driskell, 
Earl, Jr., 4-13-1-2 ; Duerson, William Robert, 2- 36-2-0 ; Duff, 
Birchell, 9-3-4-0 ; Dunaway, Heber, 2-7-3-1 ; Duncan, Earl S., 
0-7-1-0 ; Duncan. James H., 1-5-1-0 ; Durkin. Jack H., 16-19-7-1. 

Eads. Walter. 0-1-0-1 ; Edelen. Ben R.. 8-7-0-0 : Edmiston. 
Raymond Lee, 0-3-2-0 ; Edwards, Donald A., 4-0-1-0 ; Edwards, 
Hugh R., 0-0-0-1 ; Edwards, Owen. 0-1-1-0 ; Eldridge. James 
R., 1-3-1-0 ; Elkins, R. Percy. 6-8-2-3 ; Elliott. Carroll L., 
10-23-3-0; Ellington, James E., 10-9-2-1; Ellis Johnny, 0-4-0-0; 
Elovitz, Carl. 2-15-0-1; Embry, Chalmer P.. Dr.. 10-14-0-0; 
Ensslin. Charles W.. 4-1-0-0 ; Ernst. Edward R.. 0-1-0-0 ; 
Evans. James "Bug Dust". 0-6-1-1. 

Fahey. Bernard D.. 4-8-0-2 ; Fairchild. Kenton, 2-4-0-0 : 
Fannin. Benny J., 8-17-0-0 ; Farley, Jimmy, 0-3-0-1 ; Farmer, 
Lee Ralph, 6-19-5-3 ; Farmer, Russell, 0-4-3-0 ; Featherstone, 
Jerry, 0-2-0-0; Feher, A. J., 2-6-4-1; Feix, Al, 8-16-5-0: 
Feix, Jimmie, 2-4-0-0 : Ferguson. Ford. 1-0-0-0 : Ferguson, 
William, 1-15-4-2 : Ferrell, Doc T.. 41-18-4-0 ; Fields. Jerry 
J., 2- 10-8-2 ; Fields, Joe D.. 0-8-9-3 : Figg, Charles Raymond. 
0-2-3-0 ; Fisher. Larry J., 0-2-1-2 : Flagg, Robert A.. 0-3-0-0 ; 
Flaugher, Allen. 5-11-5-1 ; Flynn, Robert D.. 18-32-1-2 ; Ford. 
Joe, 4-16-1-0 ; Foster, Berryman, 10-7-1-0 ; Foster, J. W., 
1-5-0-0; Foster, William R. (Bob), 10-38-7-1; Fraley Bill, 
4-24-7-1 ; Francis, George, 9-12-3-4 ; Francis. Wendell. 3-6-1-1 ; 
Franklin, Robert. 4-7-2-0 ; Frasure. Lois E., 1-0-0-0 ; Frazier, 
Wm. Lynn. 1-0-0-0 ; Freese. O. T.. 1-12-6-4 : Fritz, Sherman, 
11-35-6-1; Fugate. E. Hugh, 8-19-9-3; Fuller, John R.. Jr., 
2-14-4-3; Fuson. Shelvie. 0-11-4-0; Fvffe, Robert G.. 0-1-1-0. 

Gabbard. John B.. 0-1-0-0 ; Gaither. Gene. 3-27-5-1 ; Gaither, 
Jack. 3-24-2-1 ; Gambill. Roger A.. 0-1-0-0 ; Gamble. Gerald 
E., 7-7-5-0 ; Gardner, Howard E.. 10-24-3-1 ; Gerding. James. 
0-5-0-0 ; Gettler. John F.. 2-13-5-3 ; Gibson, Fred W., 16-25-3-3 ; 
Gilbert, Gerald L.. 7-28-6-3; Gilbert. Ralph V.. 4-7-4-2; 
Gillespie, Robert C, 7-23-0-2 ; Gilligan, Jack, 1-3-0-0 : Giordano, 
Al, 16-19-2-4 ; Glaysbrook. James E.. 2-1-0-0 ; Godbey, Truman. 
2-4-2-0 ; Goddis. George M.. 0-1-0-0 ; Goff. Reathel. 3-2-0-0 ; 
Coins, Herman, 0-7-3-3 ; Golden, Billy Joe, 15-35-7-6 ; Golden, Mrs. 
Billy Joe. 4-4-1-0 : Golden, Leonard T.. 1-2-1-0 ; Goldsmith. Bill, 
2-3-1-0 ; Goley, Jim. 2-22-8-1 : Goodall. Walter J.. 0-1-0-1 ; Goodin. 
Charles L.. 0-8-0-0 ; Goodin, Shirley, 0-1-0-0 ; Goranflo, Robert E., 
9-7-1-0; Gordon. Billy K., 0-8-4-1; Gour. Robert (BobI A.. 13-48- 
6-1 ; Gourley. Harold E., I'-O-O-O ; Grace. Charles K., 12-16-2-0 ; 
Grace, H. E., Jr.. 3-25-2-1 ; Graham. Jim. 3-10-4-0 ; Gray, 
Raymone, 2-14-3-0 ; Greene, Jerry L.. 0-1-3-0 ; Green, Walter, 
26-8-2-0; Greene, Omar Paul, 0-1-0-0; Griffith, Edwin Dale, 
2-3-0-0 ; Grigsby, Pete, Jr., 14-8-1-2 ; Grisham. Jesse R.. 
6-14-2-2 : Groves, Glendal D., 0-3-0-0 ; Grundy, Charles A., 
0-0-2-0; Gumm, Kenneth, 1-0-1-0: Gustafson, Al, 33-26-5-0. 

Hadden. Newell P., Jr., 10-20-6-1 ; Hagan, Joseph "Red", 
27-27-6-8; Hagedorn, Thomas, 4-8-2-2; Haines, William E.. 
0-3-0-0 ; Hale, Don C. 21-12-3-1 ; Hale, John, 0-9-3-0 ; Hall, 
Monroe, Jr., 0-0-1-0 ; Hambl:n, Raymond, 0-2-0-0 ; Hamilton, 
Kenneth, 0-1-2-0 ; Hamilton, Steve A.. 2-2-2-1 ; Hammond. 
William, 0-2-0-1 ; Hardin. Don G., 3-4-0-0 : Hardin. Jack H.. 
6-2-l-!l ; Hargs. Bobby S., 3-19-1-0 ; Harned, Vic, 6-18-1-1 ; 
Harrell, Bill D., 5-7-2-0 ; Harris, Gene, 0-4-6-2 ; Harris. Jack, 
7-7-3-2 ; Harr's, Joe D.. 0-4-2-0 ; Hart. Ray, 0-1-0-0 ; Harvey, 
Bennie, 6-2-0-0 ; Harville. Robert. 7-8-1-0 ;Hatfield. Cecil E., 
1-2-1-0 ; Hatfield. Dennis. 1-0-0-0 ; Hatter. Jack, 0-8-1-0 ; 
Hatter, William F.. 0-3-1-0 ; Hayden. Samuel J.. 5-14-1-0 : 
Hayes. Douglas J. 5-14-1-0 : Haynes. John. 7-9-0-3 : Heldman 
John. Jr., Dr., 2-1-0-0 ; Hendon, L. J., 0-6-3-0 ; Henson. Tony. 
1-17-2-1 : Herald, Clarence, 0-2-0-1 : Hertzberger, Robert Harold, 
0-2-0-0 : Hewitt, Raymond T., 11-13-0-1 ; Hewling, Franklin 
C, 0-4-0-1 ; Hicks. Lloyd E., 1-1-0-0 ; Hill, Jimmie. 0-2-0-1 ; 
Hill. Martin. 2-0-S-O ; Hinkle Melvin B.. 1-2-1-0 ; Hiten. John 
W.. 8-6-1-0; Hitt, Billy D., 0-1-2-0; Hobbs, Charles V., 



STATE WINNERS IN GIRLS' TENNIS 




(Lett ti. Right) 
chaTipion; tissv Gossmai 
doubles championship team. 

11-20-2-0; Hobby. Bill, 8-14-6-1; Hodge. Fred. 1-5-0-0; Hodges. 
Hobert. 0-5-1-0; Hoferer. Louis R., 4-11-3-1; Hofstetter, 
Joe, 5-5-1-0 ; Hoh, Jack, 0-1-0-0 ; Holbrook, Arthur, 0-4-1-2 ; 
Holeman, Bill R.. 1-5-2-0 ; Holmes. Don, 1-0-0-0 ; Holmes, 
Mike, 13-9-n-O; Holmes, Robert D.. 2-1-0-0; Holt. Robert E., 
4-5-4-1 ; Holtzclaw, James R.. 1-8-4-0 ; Hook. Burnley B., 
1-21-4-1 ; Hooks. Robert. 0-2-0-0 ; Home. Frank E.. 0-0-1-0 ; 
Horton. John. 6-30-9-4 : Howard. Carl. 8-29-7-4 ; Howard. 
Henry D.. 1-0-0-0 ; Huggins, J.m, 4-16-2-3 : Hughes, Charles. 
23-7-0-1 ; Huiet. F. "Whitey" 13-13-2-0 : Hulsey. Donald R., 
2-1-0-0; Hu.-nmer. Irbv, 7-24-7-0; Hunley, Neil, P.. 12-11-1-0; 
Hurley. Robert. 0-8-0-1 ; Hurst. David E., 1-2-1-0 ; Hurst, 
Donald. 0-6-0-0 ; Hutchens. Jim, 7-1-2-0 ; Hutchinson, Jack, 
2-5-2-0 ; Huter, Jim, 37-26-0-0 ; Hyatt, Bob, 15-29-7-6 ; Hyde, 
Paul D.. 0-1-0-0; Hyland, F. D. (Dick), 0-2-0-0. 

Inman. Briscoe. 33-21-4-1 ; Irwin. Charlie. 9-28-14-2 ; Ison, 
Glennon B., 2-3-2-2. 

Jackson, Carl R., 2-0-0-0 ; Jackson, Dennis M.. 0-2-0-0 ; 
Jackson. Edward. 0-3-0-1 ; James. Edward. 0-3-2-0 ; James, 
Gene, 1-3-0-0: James, William V., 2-4-1-2; Jenkins, James 
D., 24-36-3-0 ; Jenkins, Kean, 13-23-2-1 : Jennings. Joseph 
L.. 0-1-0-0 : Johnson. Bob. 1-0-0-0 ; Johnson. James M.. 1-5-0-0 ; 
Johnson. Joe R.. l-l-J-O ; Johnson, Frank W.. 6-14-6-2 ; 
Johnson Gerry R., 0-8-0-0 : Johnson. John Luther. 1-2-0-1 ; 
Johnson. Walter. 23-8-3-2 ; Johnson. William B.. 8-14-0-0 ; 
Jones. Boyer, 24-15-4-1 : Jones. Carson G.. 1-7-0-0 : Jones, 
Charles Jr.. 0-8-3-1 : Jones, Paul : 4-1-3-1 ; Jones, 0-3-3-0 ; 
Jordan, Art, Jr., 12-15-2-4 ; Jordan, Ken, 5-26-8-2 ; Jordan, 
Larry A., 0-1-0-0 ; Joyce. Clayton. O-l-l-O ; Junker, Edwin 
G.. 0-5-1-0 ; Justice, Billy, 0-3-0-1. 

Kazee. Bill W.. 16-9-1-1 : Keeton. C. E. "Buck", 1-13-1-1 ; 
Kercher, Norman Lee. 3-8-1-1 ; Kessler. Robert H.. 1-1-1-1 ; 
Key. Calvin. (-5-2-0 ; Kidd. Roy, 9-19-:3-5 ; Kimmel, Jerry, 
25-35-6-2 ; King, Bob, 4-7-3-6 ; King, E. Lawson. 3-12-3-1 ; 
King. James A.. 22-28-3-4 ; King. John J.. Jr., 1-3-1-1 ; King, 
Russell, 2-6-0-0 ; Kinman. Joe T.. 26-26-6-2 ; Kirkwood. Patrick, 
0-9-1-2 ; Kleinschmidt. Richard. 0-2-0-0 ; Knight. Bill 22-21-4-5 ; 
Kremer. Joseph A.. 3-13-2-2 ; Kuhl. Lawrence. 2-3-1-0. 

Lamb. Paul, 0-5-1-1 ; Lambert. Irvin. 3-5-1-1 ; Lambert, 
Ken. 0-1-0-0 ; Lance. Walter. 19-34-5-1 : Landolt. Gene. 6-24-7-1 ; 
Lane. Jack. 1-2-3-0 ; Lamkert. Norman E.. G-6-2-0 ; Lash- 
brook, Harry Gene, 2-1-0-1 ; Laubheimer, Donald T.. 2-4-1-1 ; 
Lawrence. Alvin L.. 0-1-0-0 : Lawson. Leland. 6-12-0-0 : Lay, 
William B.. 1-1-1-1 ; Lazarus, Rhea P.. 19-19-3-1 : Leadingham, 
Jesse. 4-4-2-0 : Lee, Douglas, 0-1-0-0 ; Lee. Robert L., 19-17-3-1 ; 
Lee, William A.. 4-3-0-0 : Leonhardt. Donald. 0-1-0-1 ; LeQuire, 
Harold M., 14-14-1-1 ; LeVan, T. F., 0-11-7-2 : Liles, Bill, 
Sr., 3-1-0-0 : Litteral. James W.. 1-7-0-1 : Logsden. David L., 
0-1-0-1 : Long. Bill, 1-34-5-1 : Long, Marshall. 0-0-2-0 ; Long- 
genecker. David M.. 14-19-6-6 : Looney, Dick, 10-27-0-0 ; Louden, 
Hubert C. 0-2-0-0 ; Loudy, Kenneth, 5-14-3-1 ; Lowe. Eugene 
T., 18-1.5-8-0; Lucas, Willia-m S.. Jr.. 0-1-0-0; Lucas. Gene 
T. "Monk". 24-28-4-0 ; Lusby. George. 0-1-0-0 ; Lykins. Joe 
Daniel, 4-3-3-5 ; Lyons, Charles, 0-4-2-0. 

McAnelly, David ¥.. 5-12-2-1 ; McBee. William K.. 1-2-0-0 ; 
McBrayer, Donald E., 2-0-0-0 ; McBride. Donald R.. 5-19-3-1 ; 
McBride. W. Kenneth. 1^-11-11-0 ; McCargo, Frank, 9-11-2-1; 
McClellan. Leonard B.. 5-18-5-3 ; McClure. William S., 12-12-2-2 ; 
McCord, Coleman. 8-15-5-1 ; McBrowen, Connell. 12-9-3-1 : 
McCoy. Hayse. 9-13-1-3; McDonald. W. C. "Chuck". 1-2-3-3; 
McDowell. Glen D.. 5-2-2-0: McFall. Gene G.. 2-3-0-1; McGehee. 
Gordon. 0-9-6-0 : McGlasson. Galen. 0-6-2-0 ; McGlothlin. Leonard, 
0-1-0-0 ; McGuffey. Harold B., 2-1-0-0 ; McHenry, Louis P., 
6-6-0-1 : McLeod. Robert N., 2-6-3-1 : McMillin, Larry L., 
6-5-1-0: McMullan, Cecil, 2-2-0-2: McNeelv. Albert T.. 1-0-1-0; 
McPeek, Stewart R.. 1-1-0-0 ; McPike. Ray S.. 2-5-1-1 : Mack, 
Joel C. 0-1-1-0 : Macon, Alan L.. 1-5-4-0 ; Mahan. Carle "Buddy" 
28-22-6-3 ; Maines. George E.. 1-30-7-1 : Malone. Donald R., 
21-9-0-3 : Manning, Conley Lee, 2-4-1-0 ; Markert, Thomas, 
Jr.. 0-2-0-0 ; Martin, Charlie, 1-11-2-0 ; Martin, Robert E.. 
1-4-0-0 : Matthews, Lyie, Dr., 1-6-4-1 ; . Mattingly, Bernard, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



0-12-2-0 : Maxwell, James E., 0-2-1-0 ; May, E. B., Jr., 26-38-3-1 ; 
Mayes, Edward, 6-12-3-1 : Mayo. Henry L., 0-0-2-0 : Mays, 
Ralph J., 8-16-6-4 ; Meade, Foster "Sid", 36-26-4-2 : Meadows, 
Marvin, 19-20-6-2: Meek, Walter, 1-6-1-0: Meeks, Jack, 8-6-0-0: 
Meiman, William A.. 1-5-3-2 : Melmige, James, 1-1-0-0 : Meredith, 
Denny E., Jr., 0-3-1-0 : Metcalf, Earl L., 14-20-6-4 : Meyer, Bud, 
4-17-3-1 : Meyer, LeRoy C, 0-2-0-0 : Middleton, Johnny. 3-4-0-0 ; 
Milbern, Daniel Lee. 0-6-1-1 : Miles, Joseph D., 1-3-0-0 : Miles, 
Francis M., 0-8-0-2 : Miley, Robert L.. 0-1-0-0 : Miller, Bob, 
11-13-5-0 : Miller. Ferrell, 4-16-2-0 : Miller, Jack. 6-9-1-0 : 
Miller, James T.. 0-1-0-0 : Miller. Kenneth H., 4-0-0-1 : Miller, 
L. O.. Jr., 0-1-1-2 : Miller. Rex J.. 1-4-0-3 : Miller. Rov J., 
3-2-3-0: Miller. Roy L., 0-16-5-2: Minton, Eugene H., 0-2-0-0; 
Miracle, Ed., 21-10-3-2 : Moll, Francis B.. 1-5-1-0 : Monahan, 
Ed. 2-9-2-0 : Moore. Charles H., 0-1-0-0 : Moore, James E., 
0-5-2-0: Moore. Pete. 8-12-2-3: Moore. Robert W.. Jr., 2-16-6-1; 
Moore, Roy, 7-3-.6-1 : Moser, Emerson, 0-17-3-6 : Moser, Rudy 
C, 7-24-3-3 : Moss. Julian. 9-3-1-1 ; Mouser. H. D.. 6-8-2-1 ; 
Mudd. Ed. 10-26-1-6 ; Mudd. Leon, 0-0-1-0 : Mulligan, J. T., 
0-4-4-1 ; Mullins, Ben H., 0-2-1-0 ; Mullins. Bobby E.. 0-1-1-0 ; 
Murphy. J. Donald. 0-3-0-0 : Murrell, Allen L., 10-34-6-5 ; 
Musselman, Thomas, 0-1-0-0 : Mussman. Ralph, 7-15-3-0 ; Myers, 
Charles N.. 1-2-3-0 ; Myers. Edward B., 3-0-0-0. 

Nantz. Wilburn. 0-1-0-1 ; Nau. Bill. 24-5-2-6 : Neal, Gene. 
15-31-3-0 : Neal. Marion, 0-1-0-0 : Nelson. Charles L.. 2-2-0-0 ; 
Neville. Fred. 1-3-2-1 : Newman. Bill, 2-4-0-0 : Newsom, Marley, 
3-7-0-0 : Newsom, Lawrence, 2-7-4-1 ; Newton. C. M.. 19-15-1-2 ; 
Nickell. Carl Duane, 0-0-0-2 ; Nie. Allen F., 0-4-0-0 ; Nixon. 
James W.. 7-34-1-2 : Noble, Charles B., 13-7-2-0 ; Noble, Leonard. 
4-12-2-1 ; Noel, Paul W.. 17-14-4-3 ; Noel, Robert A., 0-1-1-1 : 
Nord, Ed. 9-16-2-0 ; Nunn, Wesley L., 0-0-1-1. 

Oldham. Charles. 1-0-1-1 ; Oldham. John Herman, 2-3-2-3 ; 
Omer, Billy W., 1-10-1-0: O'Nan, Harold L.. 1-1-0-0; Osborne. 
Homer L.. Dr.. 7-13-2-7 : Overton. Frank. Jr.. 0-3-1-''. 

Pack, James W., 3-Il-:3-l ; Padgett, R. K.. 5-13-3-0: Palmer, 
Carl A.. 0-2-0-0: Palumbo, Arthur O.. 0-0-0-1; Parker. Bill 
E.. 13-25-2-3 ; Parks. J. M.. 6-19-4-2 ; Parrott, Lanny 25-15-3-1 : 
Patrick, Ralph, 4-3-1-2 ; Paulin, Al. 0-1-0-0 : Payne. Gayle, 
13-16-5-2 ; Pearson, Bobby Neal, 0-20-6-7 ; Peay, Curtis. E., 
7-27-3-2 ; Peden. Harlan C. 8-9-5-1 : Peeno. Harry R., 0-3-1-0 ; 
Pence. Clyde, 2-0-0-0 ; Penrod. Joe B., 17-17-3-5 ; Penner, 
Merritt D.. Jr.. 10-.5-3-0 : Perkins. William E.. 2-8-6-0 : Perry, 
George B.. 0-6-1-0 : Perry. James E., 7-13-10-3 : Peters. Arthur, 
0-1-1-1 ; Porters. Harold Dean. 0-1-0-0 ; Phelps. Ralph "Rudy", 
14-26-2-0 : Phelps, Ray, 5-1-3-0 : Phipps, Vencil, 10-0-6-0 ; Pike, 
Robert F.. 13-17-3-2 ; Pogue, Ivan G. 6-24-8-1 ; Polly, Rex. 
6-:B-0-0 ; Polston. Billy D., 0-1-3-2 ; Powell, Logan, 10-6-6-1 ; 
Preece, Boyce C, 0-1-0-0 ; Price. Charles, 1-2-0-2 ; Price, 
James E.. 9-27-7-1 : Prichard. Glen. 0-2-1-0 ; Prior. Lowell F., 
1-7-0-1 : Pruitt. Donald Wayne, 0-1-0-0 ; Pursifull. Cleophus. 
16-11-4-0. 

Quillen, John T.. 3-10-0-0. 

Rainey. Jimmy. 8-4-0-0 ; Rains. Richard. 1-2-1-0 : Raisor. 
J. T.. 1-3-1-2 : Rail. Eugene, 3-8-4-0 ; Randolph, Don M., 
4-4-0-0 : Rapier, Burl, 0-2-0-0 ; Rapp, William. 5-3-1-0 ; Ratliff , 
Jerry R.. 0-0-3-0 : Reding. Richard K., 5-4-0-1 ; Reece. Larry 
H., 1-3-2-0; Reece. Ralph. 1-5-2-0; Reed. Gordon (Moel, 7-22-6-4; 
Reed, Charles R.. 17-16-5-3 ; Reed. William F.. 0-1-0-0 : Rein- 
hardt. Myron S.. 14-45-3-4; Renfro, John E., 0-2-1-0: Reschar, 
John v.. 6-15-5-0 ; Rexroat. Jerrv L.. 8-21-8-1 ; Rhatigan, 
Alfred J.. 7-5-0-0; Rice. William Jr.. 0-1-0-0: Richardson, 
Charles E.. 1-6-1-2: Richardson. .Joe M., 11-23-9-2; Packard, 
Bob. 1-4-0-0 ; Ricketts, Claude O., 16-30-7-4 : Rickman. Murrell 
0-6-0-0; Riffe. James R.. 1-7-0-0: Riggs. Morgan E.. 0-2-0-0,' 
Riggs. William T.. 1-7-0-1 ; Risen, Johnny B.. 1-0-0-0 ; Ritter, 
Goebel. 27-8-1-0 : Roach. Earl Wilton, 1-7-1-0 : Roberts, Donald G.. 
0-4-2-0 : Roberts. Earl C. 2-5-2-0 ; Roberts, Earl Ray. 6-5-3-1 ; 
Robinson, Don, 0-1-0-0 : Robey. Joseph L.. 19-29-14-l': Rodgers, 
David Glen, 6-7-2-1 : Roeckers, Bernard, 2-5-0-1 : Rogers Howard, 
6-3-1-0 ; Roller, Otis, 6-14-5-3 ; Rolph, Harold J., 10-6-0-0 ; 
Rose. Lee H.. 11-11-2-1; Rose, Ronald, 0-0-1-0: Rose Wally, 
5-16-2-0 : Rosenbaum, Robert L., 2-2-1-3 : Rothfuss, Dick, 0-6-1-2 ; 
Roudebush. Jack, 0-0-0-2 : Rouse. Clyde L., 6-16-9-4 ; Eubarts, 
Leland G.. 7-25-5-1 : Rudd, Thomas, 1-6-3-1 ; Runyon, Tommy 
Dean, 0-3-0-1 : Russell. Allen W.. 9-25-7-1 ; Russell, Eugene 
"Eudy". 2-6-0-0 ; Russell, Joe. 17-37-8-3. 

St. Clair. Robert L.. Jr., 8-15-6-0 ; Sallee. Charles 1-3-0-0 ; 
Salyer. Gobel. 0-7-0-0 ; Sanders. Mel. 11-25-2-3 : Sang, Robert. 
2-2-0-1 : Schad, James E., 0-5-1-0 ; Schleicher, Richard Lee, 
0-4-0-2 : Schlich. Paul E., 9-14-10-3 : Schnebelt. Carl R., 
0-1-0-0 ; Schneider. Robert. 0-0-1-0 ; Scott, Charles E., 0-2-0-1 ; 
Scott, Donald G.. 0-1-1-1 : Scott. Emmanuel H., 0-3-0-0 ; 
Seale, .John D.. 1-3-2-1 : Seelye. Arthur L.. 6-10-3-6 ; Selbee, 
William A.. 3-6-2-2: Sellman. John B., O-l-O-O : Selvy, Curt, 
27-17-2-4 ; Settle, Roy G.. 30-24-1-1 : Sexton. Steven C. 1-0-0-0 ; 
Sexton. William L.. 2-5-4-0 ; Shackleford. Roscoe. 6-13-0-2 : 
Shakleford. Roscoe. 6-13-0-2 ; Shaver, Roy, 2-2-0-0 ; Shaw, Earl, 
16-38-0-1 ; Sherrow, Winston G.. 0-3-0-0 : Showalter. John. 
6-1-0-0 : Shuck. Thomas G.. 2-19-2-1 ; Shumate, Robert. 0-1-0-0 ; 
Siler. Clarence M.. 8-10-9-1 ; Simpson, Fred C, 2-6-3-0 : 
Singleton. Vesper, 6-5-3-0; Slucher. Kenneth W.. 0-3-2-0: 
Small, Bill. 13-23-4-5 ; Smith. D. W., 12-18-3-2 ; Smith. Donald 
J.. 0-1-0-0: Smith. Edgar J., 4-18-2-2: Smith. John K., 
8-6-1-0 ; Smith. Wayne N., 11-1-2-1 ; Smith, Willard N., 
17-7-8-2 : Smithson, Richard A., 20-26-6-2 : Sosh, Larue. 
19-0-0-0 ; Sosh. Nelson. 18-0-0-0 ; Snowden, Ken, 10-4-2-0 ; 
South, William F., 1-4-1-0 ; Spahr. David L.. 0-10-1-2 : Spaulding, 
Stan, 3-4-0-0 ; Spencer, Irvin E.. 24-32-5-2 : Spiceland, S. E., 



WAGGENER'S CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF TEAM 




(Left to Right): Combs. Rick Ac 
rice. Coach Winchester. 



0-4-0-1 : Spurlock. Ralph, 12-16-1-1 ; Stacy, R;chie M.. 6-7-3-1 ; 
Stamper, Paul, 3-0-4-1 ; Stanfield. Carl, 0-1-0-0 ; Stanfill, 
Robert S.. 6-6-2-0 : Starns. Harry T., 8-8-1-0 ; Steenken, 
William R. 6-8-3-0 : Stephenson. Harry. 10-16-2-1 : Stephens, 
Kenneth H., 4-8-2-0: Stephenson. Thomas H.. 2-12-3-2; Stewart, 
Herbert T.. 1-5-2-9 : Stiff, Maur.ce. 4-4-6-0 : Stikeleather, 
Clyde L., 1-1-0-0 : StJnes, Ray A., 10-7-2-1 ; Stinson, Charles 
L., 1-5.3-1; Stone, Sidney P., 1-5-4-1; Strange, William L., 
0-10-4-2 : Straub, Charles. Jr., 5-6-4-0 ; Strong. Arnett. 26-23-3-2 ; 
Stull. Woodson. 0-1-3-1 ; Sturgill, Barkley, 2-2-1-0 : Suffill, 
Bob, 0-1-0-0 ; Sullivan, Don C, 31-12-2-0 : Sumner, Harold 
Carl. 1-6-0-0 ; Sutton. Ronnie N., 1-13-4-0 : Swope. William W., 
0-2-1-1 : Sykes, Harry N.. 0-1-0-0. 

Tackett. Hai-old, 1-2-1-1 ; Tackett, Jay, 0-1-0-0 : Tarlton, 
Thomas 0.. 0-1-0-0 : Taylor, Bob, 9-33-6-1 ; Taylor, Dennis 
H., 0-4-2-0 ; Taylor, Edwin, 8-17-10-5 ; Taylor, Hal A., 
7-16-3-1 ; Taylor. James R., 1-1-3-0 : Taylor. Rogers E., 
13-19-1-1 : Tharpe, Robert L., 1-1-0-0 ; Thoma. M. L.. 12-11-4-1 ; 
Thompson. Arthur Lee, 3-0-0-0 ; Thompson, Jack. 37-34-4-2 ; 
Thompson. Tommy D., 0-0-0-1; Tinsley, Earl L., 7-4-1-0; 
Tinsley, Marion F.. 2-6-0-1 : Tipton. Asa L. 3-8-4-0 : Todd, 
James L.. 0-4-0-0 ; Todd. Lonnie H., 0-1-1-0 : Toy, Eddie N., 
4-4-0-0: Triplett. Herby, 0-2-1-1; Troutman, Doyle C. 0-7-0-0; 
Tuck. Ochell. 14-10-6-3; Tucker, Neal R.. 1-2-0-0; Tucker, 
Roscoe. Jr., 0-2-0-0; Turner. Aaron P.. 0-2-0-0; Turner, Bruce, 
0-2-1-0; Turner, Jack. 0-1-0-0; Tyre, Donald C, 0-1-0-0. 

Urlage. Richard C. 0-6-0-0. 

Vallandingham, Dale. 0-0-1-2 : Van Arsdall, Fred, 1-4-1-1 ; 
Vance. Earl G., 6-12-5-2 ; VanMeter, Kaye Don, 0-8-3-2 : Van- 
over, Walter S.. 1-3-1-0 : VanSant. William E., 3-0-0-0 : Van- 
Winkle, Billy R., 0-15-3-1 : VanZant. Jim. 4-8-0-0 ; Varble, 
William E.. 13-20-3-0 ; Varner, Ray, 2-8-2-1 ; Vermillion, 
Charles D.. 5-7-0-0 ; Vescovi. Raymond B., 4-12-3-3 : Vinciguerra, 
Philip. 1-1-0-0 : Vinson, Ray T., 3-7-0-0 ; Vipperman. Albert 
E., 4-1-2-1. 

Waide. Harry D., 0-18-7-1 : Walker. Paul R.. 8-22-2-1 ; 
Wallen, Howard W.. 2-9-3-0 : Walls. Harrv B.. 1-4-1-2 ; 
Wanchic. Nicholas. 11-8-2-4; Ward, Jack. 1-9-2-2: Ward, 
William D.. 0-0-0-4 ; Warner, Marvin, 1-2-1-0 ; Watson, Clif- 
ford Lee, 0-3-0-0 ; Watts, Shirley R., 1-4-0-0 ; Wearren. Wade 
H., 2-21-1-0 : Weathers, Charles Jr.. 0-2-0-0 : Weaver. B. H., 
5-9-0-0 : Weaver, Ray, 2-4-0-1 ; Weber, John, 2-9-1-0 : Webster, 
Paul L.. 0-1-0-0. We:sbrodt. Paul E.. 8-23-7-1 ; Welch, John 
H.. 0-2-3-0 ; Welch, Tom. 1-1-0-0 : Wells. Milford, 25-20-1-1 ; 
Wesche. James A., 0-3-0-1 : West, Art F., 1-0-0-0 : Westerfield, 
Glenn, 3-7-5-0 ; Westhoff. Robert A.. 0-1-0-0 : Whalen. William 
Clinton, 0-3-2-1 ; Whipple, Llovd G., 4-0-0-0 ; White, David 
B., 9-37-6-2 : White, Harlie. Jr., 0-1-0-0 : White, J. L.. 0-2-3-0 ; 
White, W. Jason. 9-12-6-2; Wilcox, Edge M., 4-4-6-0; Wilcox, 
Ursal R.. 0-1-2-0 : Wilkerson. Bennie Joe. 0-2-0-0 ; Williams, 
Billy F., 0-1-0-0 : Williams, Bobbv, 3-26-2-2 ; Williams, James 
H.. 3-10-9-0 ; Williams. .Joe W., 0-0-1-1 ; Williams, Paul W., 
0-1-1-0: Williams, Roger, 11-23-4-4: Williams, Tom M., Jr.. 
7-13-4-0 ; Williams. Willie H.. 1-10-5-1 : Willis. Donald A.. 
0-3-0-0 ; Willis. Robert A.. 5-7-3-2 ; Wilson. H. G.. 0-1-3-0 ; 
Wilson. Jack R.. 20-25-5-3 : Winchester. Roy L.. 60-48-3-3 ; 
Winfrey. Shelby. 26-21-6-0 : Wingfield, F. G.. 1-13-6-2 ; Wirtz, 
Howard A., 4-6-1-0: Wise, Billy V.. 30-26-5-8: Wise, Jack, 
36-33-7-0: Withrow, Roy D.. 0-2-0-0: Wolford. Hoover. 0-0-1-0; 
Wood. James W.. 1-0-1-0 : Wood. Phillip H.. 0-3-1-0 : Woods. 
Fairce O., 5-2-0-1 ; Woods. Gene, 0-1-0-0 : Woodward, Danny 
H.. 1-6-1-2 : Woodward. Durwood. 1-8-0-1 ; Womack. William 
H.. 1-1-0-0 : Wray. Darrell. 1-1-5-0 : Wright. Billy Joe 5-17-5-1 ; 
Wright, Paul. 15-16-2-7 ; Wrigley. Joseph. 0-1-0-0. 

Yancey, William Thomas, 3-6-1-0: Yates, Howard. 0-1-1-0; 
Yeary. Bill, 2-9-1-6 ; Yessin. Humzey. 5-9-1-2. 

Zachem. Vincent, 11-6-0-0. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Eleven 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship K. H. S. A A. 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1960-1961 



Linty_ 



utny 



unty 



Adair C 

Adaiivill 

Allen Cc 

Alvaton 

Andei'sor 

Annville 

Ashland 

Attucks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy 

Auxier 

Ballard Memorial 



Barbo 



ille 



Bardstow 

Bate 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benham 

Benton 

Berea 

Betsy Layne 

Black Star 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Booker T. Washington 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Bracken County 

Breathitt County 

Breckinridge County _ 
Breckinridge Tr. 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Bryan Station 

Buckeye 

Buckhorn 

Bunche 

Burgin 



iide 



Bush 

Butler 

Butler County 

Caldwell County _ 

Calhoun 

Calloway County _ 

Camargo 

Campbell County 
Campbellsville __. 
Camp Dick Robin; 



yville 



Carlisle 

Carlisle County 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter 

Catholic Country Day 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Centertown 

Central 

Central City 

Chandlers Chapel 

Charleston 

Christian County 

Clark County 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County 

Clifty 

Clinton County 

College 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden County 

Cub Run 

Cuba 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Cynthiana 



11 I 4 I I 



3 


2 


8 


1 


1 


2 


1 











4 


7 


1 








1 





2 





1 





1 



54 


6 


SI 


15 


HI 


6 


■M 


37 


■M 


10 


ih 


13 


■M 


7 


•a 


8 


86 


10 


H7 


15 


30 


8 



TEAM 
G i F 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Dalton 



Da 



■ille 



Daviess 
Dawson 
Dayton 

Deming 
DeSales 
Dilce Co 



Heights 



(Henderson) _ 
(Lexington) _ 

(Murray) 

Lunity 



Di: 

Dorton 

Dotson 

Dougla 

Dougla: 

Douglai 

Drakesboro 

Drakes bo ro 

Dunbar (Mayfield) — 

Dunbar ( Morganfield ) 

DuBols 

Dunham 

duPont Manual 

Durham 

Durrett 

Earlington 

East Benham 

Eastern 

East Main Street 

Edmonson County 

Elizabethtown 

E'town Catholic 

E-khorn City 

Eminence 

Estill County 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Fairdale 



Fail 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fordsville 

Forkland 

Fort Knox 

Foundation 

Frankfort 

Franklin County . 
Franklin-Simpson 
Frederick Fraize . 
Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Fulton County __. 
Gallatin County _. 



aliel 



Garrett 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 
Greensburg _,. 
Greenup 



ille 



Guthr 
Halde 
Hall 

Hanson 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Hazel Green Acad. __ 

Heath 

Hellier 

Henderson 

Henderson County __. 
Henderson Settlement 

Henry Central 

Henry Clay 

Hickman County 

Highlands 



13 


3 


7 


2 


« 


1 


14 


4 


9 


1 


2 






2 


30 


1 « 


31 





43 





35 


2 


41 





45 





30 


3 


46 





47 


1 


22 





11 


2 


31 


1 


33 


2 


44 





64 


2 


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2 


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34 





28 





57 


1 


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6 


44 


1 


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41 


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2 


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26 


9 


21 


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14 


21 


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33 


4 



1 I I 30 I 20 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Thirteen 



His 



'ille 



Hitchins 

Holmes 

Holy Cross __ 
Holy Family 
Holy Name _. 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branct 
Howevalley _. 
Hughes Kirk _ 
Hustonville _. 

Inez 

Irvine 



Jessamine County 

J. M. Atherton 

Johns Creek 

Junction City 

J. W. Million 

Kingdom Come 

Knott County 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

Letcher 

Lewisburg 

Lewisport 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln (Middlesboro) 

Lincoln (Paducah) 

Lincoln ( Stanford ) 

Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Ridge) 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Livingston Central 

Lloyd 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

Lynn vale 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madison Central 

Madison-Model 

Madisonville 

Male 

Marrowbone 

Mason IIIII"III1IIIIIII1"2II 



Mason County 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Maytown 

M. C. Napier 

Meade County 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial ( Hardy villel 
Memorial I Waynesburg) 

Menifee County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middleburg 

Middlesboro 

Midway 

Millersburg 

Montgomery County 

Monticello 

Morgan County 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 
















COACH 






OFFICIALS 






CROWD 








E 1 G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


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1 




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20 


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10 


2 





42 


6 








36 


8 


3 


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5 


2 


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38 


6 








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33 


10 





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5 


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23 


12 








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2 


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1 





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8 


3 


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4 


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2 





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37 


7 


1 1 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 
Mullins 

Munfordville 

Murray 



ray College 

Nancy 

Nebo 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Marshall 

North Middletown 

North Warren 

Oil Springs 

Oldham County 

Old Kentucky Home 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida Inst. 

Owen County 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 



■ille 



Uwmgsv 
Owsley County 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Paris Western 

Park City 

Parksville 

P. L. Dunbar (Lexington) 

Pendleton County 

Perryville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

ntain 



ille 



Pie 



ille 



Poplar Creek — 
Powell County _ 
Prestonsburg — 

Prichard 

Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Rineyville 

Rii 



Rockhold 

Rosenwald (Barbourville) 

Rosenwald I Harlan I 

Rosenwald (Lebanon) 

Rosenwald (Madisonville) 

Rosenwald (Providence) 

Rosenwald Dunbar (Nicholasville) 

Rowan County 

Russell County 

Russell 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha 

St. Agnes 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 

St. Benedict 



St. Camillus 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Joseph (Bowling Green) __. 
St. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown) 
St. Mary's Acad. (Paducah) _. 

St. Mary (Alexandria) 

St. Patrick 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent 

St. Xavier 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Scott County 

Scottsville 

Sebree _ 

Sedalia 

Seneca 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee 



12 


1 


X 


1 


K 


2 


5 





15 


X 


in 


5 


« 


•>. 


n 






OTHER SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 

E 1 G i F I P 



an 


13 


85 


11 


4(1 


8 


;i7 


13 


■^4 


17 


2H 


10 


:«i 


14 


32 


16 



E 


G 


34 


11 1 


37 


14 


36 


16 


31 


7 


33 


13 


17 


6 


12 


6 


51 


12 


28 


18 1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Page Fifteen 



th 



Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville, _ 

Shopville 

Silver Grove ._ 

Simmons 

Simon Kenton 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Hopkins 
South Marshall 

Springfield 

Southern 

South Portsmot 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Symsonia 

Taylor County __ 

Taylorsville 

Temole Hill ___. 
Todd County __. 
Todd County Tr 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville - 
Trigg County _. 
Trimble County 

Trinity 

Tyner 

Un'versity 

Valley 

Vanceburg- Lewis 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Walton-Verona 

Warfield 

Warren County 

Wayland 

Wayne County 

Western ( Owensboro) 

Western (Sinai) 

West Main 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

William Grant (Covington I 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wolfe Coun~ty"~-~_~.'.~_~_~_~_"_"_~r_VJ 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 



unty 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 
















COACH 




[ OFFICIALS 






CROWD 






TEAM 


E 1 G 


F 


P 


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F 


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Football Classes and Regions Tilghman, Warren County. 



The football classes and regions for 
1961 and 1962, as determined reeentlv by 
the K. H. S. A. A. Board of Control, are as 
follows : 

Class AAA 

Region I — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xaxier, 
Shawnee, Trinity. 

Region II — District 1 : Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Southern, Fairdale, Valley; District 
2; Butler, Pleasure Ridge Park, Durrett, 
Seneca, Waggener. 

Class AA 

Region I — Bowling Green, Caldwell 
County, Crittenden County, Daviess County, 
Franklin Simpson, Henderson, Henderson 
County, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Mayfield, 
Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Paducah 



Region H — Bryan Station, Clark, 
County, Danville, Dunbar (Lexington), Eliz- 
abeththown, Fort Knox, Franklin County, 
Henry Clay, Kentucky Military Institute, 
Lafayette, LaRue County, Lincoln Institute, 
Madison, Oldham County, St. Joseph, Shelby 
County, Somerset. 

Region III — Ashland, Boone County, 
Campbell County, Dixie Heights, Hig'hlands, 
Holmes, Louisa, McKell, Newport, Newport 
Catholic, Russell, Wurtland. 

Region IV — District 1: Bell County, 
Corbin, Cumberland, Evarts, Hall, Hazel 
Green, Knox Central, Middlesboro; District 
2: Belfry, Fleming-Neon, Hazard. Jenkins, 
Leslie County, M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, 
Wheelwright, Whitesburg. 

Class A 
Region I — Attucks, Douglass (Hender- 
son), Douglass (Murray), Fulton, High 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1961 



Again Offering Coverage 
For K.H.S.A.A. Sports Officials 



PROVIDES ACCIDENTAL DEATH, DISMEMBERMENT AND ACCI- 
DENT MEDICAL EXPENSE BENEFITS DUE TO INJURIES SUSTAIN- 
ED WHILE OFFICIATING A HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE FOOTBALL 
GAME OR WHILE TRAVELING TO OR FROM SUCH GAME. 



KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



7<4e KUUfdeit Go-inpxi4Uf 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 

Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



Stree, Lincoln (Franklin), Lincoln (Pa- 
ducah), Morganfield, Murray, Providence, 
Russellville, Sturgis, Trigg County, Western 
(O'wensboro). 

Region II — Anderson, Bardstown, 
Bate, Campbellsville, Catholic Country Day, 
Frankfort, Georgetown, Glasgow, Harrods- 
burg, Jessamine County, Lancaster, Leban- 
on, Lincoln (Stanford), Louisville Country 
Day, Mercer County, Metcalfe County, Old 
Kentucky Home, Shelbyville, Shepherdsville, 
Springfield, Stanford, Tompkinsville, Ver- 
sailles. 

Region III — Beechwood, Bellevue, 
Bourbon County, Carlisle, Carrollton, Cat- 
lettsburg, Cynthiana, Dayton, DuBois, Elk- 
horn City, Harrison County, Irvine, Lloyd, 
Ludlow, Millersburg Military Institute, Mt. 
Sterling, Paintsville, Paris, Raceland, West- 
ern (Paris), Pikeville. 

Region IV — Barbourville, Black Star, 
Buckhorn, Dike Combs, East Main, Harlan, 
Lily, London, Loyall, Lynn Camp, Pineville, 
Rosenwald (Harlan), Wallins, West Main, 
Williamsburg. 



P. 0. Department Needs Help! 

An important new policy statement on the Post Office 
Department's program in the field of law enforcement against 
mail obscenity — emphasizing enforcement without fanfare — 
has been issued by Postmaster General J. Edward Day. 

The statement, which applies to the whole anti-obscenity 
ilrogram. was issued specifically in connection with the 
sentencing on January 27, 1961 in Federal Court in Washington, 
D. C. of Herman L. Womack of Washington and Alfred J. 
Heinecke of Lakewood, N. J., on charges of conspiring to use 
the mails in the transmittal of obscene material. 

Here is the text of Mr. Day's statement : 

"We in the Post Office Department are gratified at the 
sentences given today to these serious offenders who have been 
convicted of using the mails to transmit smut material. 

"We have underway plans for the toughest crack-down ever 
conducted for such violators of the laws against mailing 
pornographic material. Hereafter our approach will be that 
used by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other highly 
successful law enforcement agencies, in that our drive will be 
conducted without fanfare. We will concentrate our available 
manpower and funds on apprehending violators. 

"Our public statements on the pornography program will 
largely be confined to comments on actual results achieved and 
convictions obtained. 

"Needless to say, we seek the assistance of the public in 
general in reporting receipts of illegally maied materiaJ. We 
are confident that the general public realizes there are stern 
laws against this tyi^e of corrupting activity and that other 
law enforcement agencies throughout the country will co- 
operate with us in bringing to our attention cases that reQuire 
investigation or action. We will focus on the most urgent 
situations and will refuse to be diverted by fringe cases. 

"The inspection service of the Post Office Department is 
the oldest and without doubt one of the finest law enforce- 
ment agencies in the United States, an we count on them to 
hit hard in getting this job done." 



SUTCUffE IS KEAPy 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic equipment for the fall season 




Now we can give you immediate delivery. No Delay ! No Waiting ! 
Stock merchandise can be shipped on the very day your order is 
received. 



QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nationally- 
advertised preferred quality brands. 



"•CS^ \ 



SUTCLIFFE'S SERVICE 

For on-the-spot service, the Sutcliffe School representative wOl 
contact you, as usual, during the year. Bill Shannon, 122 Yancey 
Drive, So. Ft. Mitchell, will cover eastern Kentucky; Charles 
"Chuck" Shuster, Horse Cave, will travel western Kentucky; and 
Al Lecomte, 2502 Cottonwood Drive, Louisville, will cover the 
Louisville area. 

Write us about your needs. Remember we give one-day service. 



SUTCLIFFE CATALOGUE— If you have not received your copy of 
our 1961 Fall Catalog by September 10, please drop us a card and we 
shall send you one promptly. You will be quick to appreciate the top- 
flight athletic items from which you may select your Fall equipment. 




THE Sutcliffe CO. 

INCORPORATED 

225 SO. FOURTH ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



^JtS5Ss3Ss5?5\5?5S;35S5s5s5s?/9 



-^f gysToj i^ 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



U. OF K. COACHING CLINIC 

We hope you visited our display at the Coliseum during the University of 
Kentucky Coaching Clinic in Lexington on August 9-12, 1961. 

If you failed to place your order at that time we are still able to take care 
of any football orders in the most satisfactory manner, as our stock of 
football equipment is larger and more complete than ever. 

On special-made merchandise we feel confident that we can have the mer- 
chandise in your possession in plenty of time for any requirement. 

Any shipment made during the months of August or September will carry 
October 1, 1961 dating. 

On any of your incidental supplies check upon the following : 

Football tees, table pumps, electric inflators, shoulder pad laces, 
pant laces, shoe laces, plastic face guards, rubber teeth guards 
or protectors, helmet paint for leather or plastic helmets, all types 
of chin straps, aluminum cleats, rubber cleats, dry stag line white 
for marking football fields, blocking dummies, line markers, lines- 
men's chains, goal line markers, sideline markers, football goal 
posts, sideline capes. Fair Play football scoreboards. Fair Play 
basketball scoreboards, portable bleachers, dry or wet line 
markers, Whirlpool Baths, Vibra Whirl Baths by Cramer, football 
posters, first-aid kits, Cramer's first-aid supplies, a complete 
line of practice jerseys, sweat socks, athletic supporters, surgical 
scissors, etc. 



We will be looking forward to seeing you at various 
year. Look for our salesmen to call. 



«9 





High School Athlete 



K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 





On August 11-12 Edgar McNabb. Kentucky's voting delegate on the National 
Federation Football Committee, conducted a school for football officials in Lex- 
ington. The officials who attended the school will return to their respective areas 
and conduct similar meetings and clinics throup,hout the forthcoming football 
season. Area renresentatives, pictured above, are: (Left to Right) Front Row — 
Bill Gammon, Ashland; Kean Jenkins. Elizabethtown; J. W. Thurman, Manches- 
ter; Jack Faust, Louisville; Bernard Johnson, Lexington. Second Row — Joe Rus- 
sell, Russellville ; School Director Edgar McNabb, South Fort Mitchell; Edgar 
Smith, Louisville; Gene Neal, Batavia; Gene Cathey, Murray; Bill Womack. Hen- 
derson. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

SEPTEMBER - 13B1 ^ 




NATIONAL 
ALLIANCE 



FOOTBALL OFFICIALS' SIGNALS 



J Foul Signals 1 to 1 6X. 




7^26 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXIV— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1961 



fl.OO Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: The.se rulings do not set 
rule. They are interpretations on som 
tuations which have been presented. 



Installment I 

1. Play: 4th and 10 on K's 20. K's punt is first 
touched by K2 on his 30. It rebounds behind the line, 
where K3 recovers and advances to the 50. During 
the advance (a) R; or (b) K holds on K's 40. 

Ruling: If, in either (a) or (b), the penalty for 
the foul is accepted, the rio'ht of R to take the ball 
at the spot of first touchi.ng is canceled. In (a), if K 
accepts the penalty, it will b3 measured from the 50 
and it will be 1st and 10 for K on R's 35. If K refuses 
the penalty, R may take the ball at the spot of first 
touching (K's 30). In (b), R will usually refuse the 
penalty and take the ball at the spot of first touching. 
If R were to accept the penalty, it would be measured 
from K's 40 (spot of foul) a.nd the succeeding down 
would be 4th and 5 on K's 25. 

2. Play: Linebacker of Team B has hand on back 
of lineman Bl, who is in front of him. Linebacker adds 
momentum to charge of Bl by pushi.ng him into 
opponent. 

Ruling: This is not illegal. 

3. Play: 3rd and 25 on the 50 yardline. Ineligible 
A6 advances at snap and is about to catch pass on B's 
30 yardline when Bl pushes him in attempting to 
reach ball. The pass falls incomplete. 

Ruling: Legal use of hands by Bl. There is no 
forward pass interference with an ineligible. 

4. Play: For their starting signals, Team A uses 
an audible count during which all players count in 
unison. One or more players drop or nod their heads 
on the count. 

Ruing: If the dropping or nodding of the heads 
simulates action at the snap, or if, in the official's 
opinion, the action is clearly intended to cause B to 
foul, A is guilty of committing a false start. 

5. Play: Al wears contact lenses. During play a 
lens gets out of position causing discomfort. 'The 
ready-for-play signal is delayed or clock is stopped for 
Al and assistance from bench is necessary to properly 
readjust the lens. 

Ruling: Time-out is charged to Team A. If, in 
the Referee's opinion, the wrongly placed lens is in- 
juring Al or might injure him if not properly in- 
serted and adjusted, the referee is authorized to re- 
quire that Al be replaced for 1 down. 

6. Play: Rl makes valid fair catch signal but 
misjudges K's kick and has to move forward rapidly 
to catch it. Immediately after catching K's kick, he 
momentarily juggles ball covering perhaps two steps 
before completing catch. 

Ruling: Rl has made a fair catch. He cannot ad- 
vance nor can he be tackled. After fair catch signal 
and kick has been muffed bv Rl, K may use hands to 
get at ball (6-4-5). After R's touching of the ball, the 
provisions of the fair catch rule do not apply. How- 
ever, K may not tackle nor hold in any other way. 

7. Play: Substitute S12 replaces Al during dead 



ball. Before ball becomes alive, Al enters for S12. Has 
S12 been a player? 

Ruling: Foul. After administration of penalty, 
Al may remain in game. By rule, S12 has become a 
player "when he legally entered the field and indi- 
cated to" Al that Al was replaced. However, whether 
or not S12 has participated will depend on the spon- 
soring organizations interpretation of the word. Most 
organizations do not consider a player to have par- 
ticipated until he has been in the game for at least 
one live ball play or interval. 

8. Play: Legal forward pass by Al is deflected 
beyond line by Bl. Eligible A5 catches pass and throws 
a backward pass to Al, who still is behind line of 
scrimmage. Al throws a second forward pass which 
is from behind line. Are all A players eligible for 
second forward pass? 

Ruling: No. Only those A players who were on 
end of the line of scrimmage or who were legally be- 
hind the scrimmage line are eli,gible for second for- 
ward pass. All ineligibles have to be on the line of 
scrimmage or no farther beyond the neutral zone 
than their charge carries them in driving an opponent 
back. 

9. Play: Is "first touching" an appeal play where 
R must request the right of exercising his option? 

Ruling: No. Referee should call attention of the 
Captain of Team R to this matter and explain the 
options to him. 

10. Play: K's kick from scrimmage strikes Rl on 
chest while Rl is behind his scrimmage line. Ball re- 
bounds into air toward R2. As R2 is about to catch 
ball he is blocked to ground by K2. K3 recovers ball. 

Ruling: K's ball at spot of recovery. There has 
been no infraction. 

11. Play: During try for: (a) field-goal, or (b) 
point after touchdown, B2 stands on shoulders of Bl 
in attempt to block A's place-kick. 

Ruling: Unsportsmanlike conduct. 

12. Play: 3rd period ends with ball on A's 43 
yardline, 3rd and 8. Ball is erroneously put in play 
from A's 48 yardline and the first play in the 4th 
quarter is run. Error is discovered during first down 
or at its end. 

Ruling: Start the quarter over from A's 43 yard- 
line. If discovery is after the start of the 2nd down 
during the 4th quarter, no adjustment may be made. 

13. Play: Bl grasps edge of head protector which 
extends over forehead of runner Al in attempting to 
stop him. 

Ruling: If Bl twists or unnecessarily jerks head 
protector, it is a personal foul for unnecessary rough- 
ness. However, it is not a foul to grasp the head pro- 
tector (other than the face protector) unless there is 
unnecessary roughness involved. In play situation 415A 
on page 71 of the Football Case book, the phrase 
"but it is never permissible for him to hook his finger 
in it," refers to the face protector and not to the 
head protector. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



SEPTEMBER, 1961 



VOL. XXIV— N0.2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 
Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 

BOARD OF CONTROL 
President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62). Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville: Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63). Browder: Preston Holland (1961-65). Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings 11961-65), Danville: Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64), Paintsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan. 

Subscription Rates .$1.00 Per Year 

Jtiom the Commissioners Cjjffice 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Kenlake Hotel, 
Kentucky Lake State Park, on Saturday morning, 
July 22, 1961. The meeting was called to order by 
retiring President Louis Litchfield at 9:00, with all 
Board members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and 
Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton, that the reading of the minutes of the April 22nd 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Mr. Litchfield and Vice-President W. B. Jones, 
each of whom had ended eig'h-year Board terms on 
June 30, 1961, expressed to other members of the 
Board present their pleasure at having had an official 
connection with the K. H. S. A. A. and at having been 
associated with other members of the Board in serving 
the Association. Other members of the Board answered 
with appropriate remarks. , 

Mr. Litclifield stated that the next order of busi- 
ness was the election of the president and vice-presi- 
dent of the Board of Control. Oran C. Teater nomin- 
ated W. H. Crowdus for the presidency of the Board 
of Control. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the nominations cease and that Mr. 
Crowdus be elected by acclamation. All voted "Aye" 
but Mr. Crowdus who did not vote. 

Cecil A. Thornton nominated K. G. Gillaspie for 
the vice-presidency, and Robert P. Forsythe nomin- 
ated Jack Dawson. Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded 
by Oran C. Teater that the candidates retire. The 
motion was carried. Ballots were passed, and a 
tabulation of ballots by Messrs. Si^nford and Crowdus 
indicated that Mr. Gillaspie had been elected. 

President Crowdus welcomed to the Board 
Principal Don R. Rawlings of Danville High School 
and Athletic Director Preston Holland of Murray 
High School, newly elected directors. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board 
on the receipts and disbursements of the K.H.S.A.A. 
for the year 1960-61. He presented copies of the 
audit, recently prepared by the Johnson-Fowler Com- 
pany of Louisville. Total funds on hand June 30, 
1961, were reported as being $100,755.67. He stated 
that a complete breakdown on receipts and expenses 
would appear in a forthcoming issue of the magazine. 
He then presented a revised K.H.S.A.A. budget for 
the 1961-62 school year, with estimated receipts of 
$117,900.00 and estimated disbursements of $116,130.- 



00. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
that the i-eport of the Commissioner be accepted and 
approved; and that the 1961-62 revised K.H.S.A.A. 
budget be adopted as presented. The motion was 
can-ied unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie suggested the need of a conjmittee 
to make a study of certain Board of Control and 
Association policies, not presently covered under 
Association regulations. He moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that the President appoint a Policy 
Committee. The motion was carried unanimously. 

K. G. Gillaspie gave a very complete report on 
the recent National Federation Annual Meeting, held 
at French Link, Indiana. 

September 30 was set as the date of the fall 
meeting of the Board of Control. 

There was a discussion of the forthcoming 1961 
football playoffs. Attention was called to the fact 
that the Board of Control, in a meeting lield on 
December 22, 1960, had established an alternating 
plan for semi-final sites, beginning in 1961 and being 
determined by lot. Drawings were made by the Board 
members, and it was determined that the home sites 
in 1961 for Class AA schools would be Regions 1 and 
3, with Regions 2 and 4 being the home sites for 
Class A schools. The numbers will reverse in 1962. 

The Commissioner recommended that the football 
classifications for 1961-62 be based on 1960-61 en- 
rollments. Robert P. Forsythe moved, seconded by 
Cecil A. Thornton, that the recommendation be ac- 
cepted. The motion was carried unanimously, 

Messrs. Joseph N. Hullett and Dave Burnett of 
the Louisville Lions Club appeared before the Board 
to explain the management of the Kentucky-Indiana 
All-Star games, and answered questions concerning 
the disposition of the game profits. The Commissioner 
gave in detail the history of certain all-star game 
problems in Kentucky during past years, and ex- 
plained to the visitors the present position of the 
Board of Control relative to the sanctioning of post- 
season and all-star contests. He also explained the 
K.H.S.A.A. regulations which were involved in past 
Board decisions. There was no request for any action 
to be taken by the Board at this meeting. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Preston 
Holland, that all bills of the Association for the 
period beginning April 22, 1961, and ending July 
19, 1961, be allowed. The motion was cairied 
unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



Use of Registered Officials 

A list of registered football officials appears in 
this issue of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches 
should study the current list to determine whether or 
not all officials with whom contracts have been signed 
have registered this fall. Supplementary lists of 
officials will appear in subsequent issues of the 
magazine. By-Law 22 provides that member schools 
shall use registered officials in all footbsdl and 
basketball games, and that failure to comply with 
this regulation makes the home school liable for 
suspension. If there is any question about registration, 
the official should be asked to present his card. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Page Three 



K. H. S. A. A Leaders 







W. H. Crowdns Kenneth G. Gillaspie 

President Vice-President 

Prin. W. H. "Johnie" Crowdus of the Franklin 
Junior High School, Board of Control membei' repre- 
senting Section 3, was elected President of the Board 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association at 
the summer meeting of the Board of Control, held 
on July 22. Supt. Kenneth G. Gillaspie of the George- 
town City Schools was elected Vice-President of the 
Association. He represents Section 5. 

The new President, a native of Franklin, attended 
Western State College where he received his B.S. 
and M.A. degrees. He has the degree of Rec. Dir, 
from Indiana University, and has completed his 
course for his Re. D. 

From 1935 to 1942 Mr. Crowdus worked at 
Western as trainer and assistant in the Physical 
Education Department. He served in the U. S. Navy 
during the 1942-45 period. In Franklin Junior High 
School he started teaching in the field of Health and 
Physical Education. He has been an assistant coach 
in varsity football and basketball. In January of 
1953 he became principal of the junior high school. 

In 1943 Mr. Crowdus married Miss Ina Bledsoe 
of Hiseville. He is church lay leader of the Fianklin 
Methodist Church and a past chairman of the Official 
Board. He is a member of the Board of Directors of 
the Franklin Rotary Club. Last May he received from 
Radio Station W.K.A.Y. at Glasgow a plaque for 
being the Southern Kentuckian who had done the 
most for sports in 1960-61. He is a member of 
numerous professional organizations. 

Mr. Gillaspie is a graduate of Mt. Sterling High 
School. He received his A.B. degree from Georgetown 
College, and his M.A. degree from Columbia Uni- 
versity. He has done additional post-graduate work 
at Western Kentucky State College, Georgetov*Ti 
Peabody College, and the University of Kentucky. 

Mr. Gillaspie played basketball and football at 
Georgetown College. He was assistant coach at the 
Morganfield High School for four years. During his 
eleven-year tenure at Morganfield, he was principal 
for three years and superintendent for the last eight. 
He went to the Garth High School, Georgetown, in 
1939 as principal, and has been superintendent at 
Georgetown since 1952. 

In 1928 Mr. Gillaspie married Miss Martha 
Jane Thompson, who died in 1936. In 1940 he married 
Mrs. Mary Willoughly Scott of Georgetown. He has 
two step-daughters and four step-grandchildren. 

At the present time Mr. Gillaspie is secretary 
of the Georgetown Rotary Club and a past-president 
of the Central Kentucky Conference, the Central 



Kentucky Education Association, the Kentucky As- 
sociation of Secondary School Principals, the Western 
Kentucky Athletic Conference, the Georgetown College 
Alumni Association, the Moi-ganfield Kiwanis Club 
and the Georgetown Rotary Club. He was formerly 
Chairman of the Deacons of the Georgetown Baptist 
Church. He holds membership in numerous fraternal 
organizations. 



Basketball Clinics 

The 1961-62 rules meetings for registered basket- 
ball officials and coaches will be conducted by Charlie 
Vettiner, who has served the Kentucky High School 
Association as clinic director for many years. The 
dates and sites of the meetings are as follows: 

October 8, Newport High School, 1:30 P. M. 

October 8, University H. S., Lexington, 8:00 P.M. 

October 9, Morehead State College, 1:30 P. M. 

October 9, Ashland, Y.M.C.A., 8:00 P.M. 

October 10, Pikeville High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 10, Hazard Hig<h School, 8:00 P.M. 

October 11, Bell High School, Pineville, 1:30 P.M. 

October 11, Somerset High School, 7:00 P. M. 

October 12, Louisville, 7:00 P. M. 

October 15, Elizabethtown High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 15, Bowling Green, W.K.S.C, 7:00 P. M. 

October 16, Hopkinsville High School, 1:30 P. M. 

October 16, Mayfield High School, 7:00 P. M. 

Octoper 17, Henderson High School, 1:30 P. M. 

October 17, Beaver Dam, 7:00 P. M. 



New Basketball Film 

The premier shovring of the new film, OFFICIAL 
BASKETBALL, was held during the 42nd Annual 
Meeting of the National Federation, held at French 
Lick, Indiana, in July 1961. Four color prints of the 
film have been rented by the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association and placed on loan with the 
film library of the University of Kentucky. 

OFFICIAL BASKETBALL was produced under 
the sanction of the National Federation in cooperation 
with the National Basketball Committee of the 
United States and Canada and Allied Groups. 
Wheaties Sports Federation and Wilson Sporting 
Goods Company are again serving as co-sponsors of 
the film as they have for the nineteen rules films. 

The scences of OFFICIAL BASKETBALL was 
filmed in the Ames High School gymnasium, Ames, 
Iowa. The host state association was the Iowa 
H.S.A.A. 

The theme, "Why The Official Blows His 
Whistle," will provide both understanding of the rules 
and entertainment. Demonstrations involve official 
rules interpretations covering screening, traveling, 
jump ball, front and back court, throw-ins, free throws,, 
personal and technical fouls, rebounding, unusual and 
often misunderstood play situations, and the important 
part played by the rules in keeping the three S's in 
the game of basketball, namely, speed, science and 
skill. 

OFFICIAL BASKETBALL is recommended for 
use by officials, coaches, players and fans for a better 
understanding and enjoyment of the game of basket- 
ball. 



Paga Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

For some time the Dutchman has been holding 
questions sent to him from every noot; and cranny 
over Kentucky. That is why this month's column is a 
new departure from the others. For September, we 
are serving you a menu of questions topped off with 
answers for dessert. 

1. If I recommend an individual for a Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award, will he automatically get one? 

ANSWER: Ordinarily, only one Corn Cob Pipe 
of Honor Award is given each month. Your rec- 
ommendation will be honored but it may be that 
several months will elapse first. 

2. How do I become a football or basketball official 
i.T Kentucky? 

ANSWER: Simply write Commissioner Ted San- 
ford, Box 1173, Lexington, Kentucky, and say, "Please 
tell me how 1 may become a registered official with 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Association." Ted 
will take it from there. 

3. How many High School basketball games are 
played each week in the Nation? 

ANSWER: About 50,000, which would necessitate 
the training of at least 50,000 officials. 

4. Whom do you consider the greatest football 
coach of the 20th Century, 

ANSWER: The Dutchman is a youngster and 
has not lived all of the 20th Century. For the few, 
short years which he has sojourned in this "realm of 
tears" he definitely puts his finger on Knute Rockne 
of Notre Dame. 

5. Name the High School football, basketball, and 
baseball officials whom you would consider the best 
you have see.n. 

ANSWER: Bill Doak, who loamed gridirons in 
the early thirties, gets the nod for football; Edgar 
McNabb for the "Granddaddy" of all basketball of- 
ficials; while Dee Wells will be the Dutchman's choice 
in baseball. 

6. How many nominations are there yearly for 
the Flying Dutchman Awards? 

ANSWER: Around twenty for the Com Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award, about one dozen for the Game 
Guy .A.ward, and, strangely enough, less than one-half 
dozen for the Abou Ben Adhem Award. 

8. How many years have you conducted the Basket- 
ball Clinics Program and the School for Basketball 
Officials for the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association? 

ANSWER: The October clinics will mark my 
twentieth consecutive year, while I have just finished 
my thirteenth consecutive School For Basketball 
Officials. 

9. How many High School basketball officials are 
registered in the United States? 

ANSWER: Approximately 50,000 and this ex- 
cludes college, professional, industrial, and recrea- 
tion competition. 

10. How many will attend your Basketball Clinic 
Program in October? 

ANSWER: Preparations have been made to ac- 
commodate 2,200 in the fifteen clinics scattered over 
Kentucky. 

11. Is it true that coaches and players will be 
allowed to coach openly from the side lines during 
the 1961-62 basketball season? 





THE DUTCHMAN 

ANSWER: Brether.i and Sisters, as a preacher 
of the basketball gospel, this will be one of my ser- 
mons. It is certainly true. 

12. If I want to attend ths Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association's School for Basketball Officials 
which is held in Lexington in August, am I welcome? 

ANSWER: You certainly are: Many stay away 
because they think that th? school is exclusive for the 
sixteen representatives invited to represent their 
regions. Everybody is welcome as spectators. 

13. What would you say is the most important 
character trait of a sports officials? 

ANSWER: A good sanse of humor. 

14. How do I get a rule interpretation in football 
and basketball when I need one? 

ANSWER: For football, call Edgar McNabb at 
Fort Mitche!!; for basketball, telephone the Flying 
Dutchman at JU 3-2S18, Louisville. 

15. :n which clinics do you find the most out-of- 
state basketball officials in attendance? 

ANSWER: In Ne-,vpoit they come from Ohio. In 
Ashland we gat a lot of officials from both Ohio and 
West Virginia. In Howling Green the Tennessaans are 
prominent in atteniancs. At Mayfield the boys from 
Southern Illinois cross the big river to be at the 
clinics. Louisville gets the Southern Indiana officials. 

16. If I have a stoiy for the Flying Dutchman, 
how do I get it in the Athlete? 

ANSWER : Put it in an envelope, making sure 
to put a stamp on the outside, and address it to "The 
Flying Dutchman," Armory Building, Louisville 2, 
Kentucky. 

17. Who is the winner of the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor Award for the month of September? 

ANSWER: The little thoroughbred with the 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor adorning his neck is already 
in the mail on its way to Curt Davis, Superintendent 
of Elliott County Schools, Sandy Hook, Kentucky. 
Very quietly this gentleman has gone far beyond the 
call of duty to be helpful to his students after they 
have graduated from his school. His unselfish acts, 
which have caused a number of young people to get 
advanced education, have only recently been called 
to the Dutchman's attention; so it has to be Curt 
Davis for the month of September. This gentleman is 
truly one of Nature's Noblemen. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Page Five 



Registered Football Officials 
of the K. H. S. A. A.^1961 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Abele. George F., 125 Louisana, I^xington, 6-5671, 2-9965 
Adkins, Wendell L., Box 57, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3544, 

M04-3444 
Allen, Charles E., 4236 Lynnbrook Drive, Louisville 20, 

451-0463 
Almon, James H., 187 1st St., Lynch, 848-5942 
Alston, Rev. E. Deedom, 473 South 11th St., Louisville, 

SP 2-1092. JU 7-6129 
Anders, Ealeigh, Virginia Ave., Pineville, ED 7-2754 
Anderson, E. W., Jr., 504 Highland, Mayfield, CH 7-1794, 

CH 7-1537 
Asbury, Frank, 702 Eversole, Hazard, GE 6-2578. GE 6-2500 
Atkinson. Charlie, 26 E. 19th St., Paris, 172, 38 
Attick, William E., 8504 Shirley Lane, Pleasure Ridge Park, 

WA 1-3421, Ft. Kno.x 4-3165 
Baker, Charles, J.. 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 443-3043, 444-6311 
Ballard. Robert A, R.R. 3. Shelbyville, ME 3-1238, ME 3-1864 
Barbour, Morris H.. 440 Wilberforce Ct., Louisville 3 
Barlow, Bill B., 3050 Lynnwood Dr.. Paris, 63 J, Lexington 

2-2220 Ext. 2263 
Barlow. Bob. Lynnwood Dr., Paris. 1979 
Bartels, John, 423 Third. Dayton, JU 1-4250, HE 1-9088 
Bauer, Richard E., 721 Kent, New Albany, Indiana, WH 4-1102, 

ME 4-1581 
Baughn, E. L., 1403 Johnson Blvd.. Murray, PL 3-5799, 395-4186 
Beach, Harold. 3007 4th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Beck, C. Norman, 2588 Filson Ave., Louisville, ME 4-1737, 

.lU 2-3511, Ext. 352-363 
Beheler, Donald Stuart, 136 Taylor Ave., Paris, 1317. Le.xington 

5-0080 
Bell. Clarence T.. 1228 So. 41st St., Louisville 11. SP 8-7792, 

JU 4-1361 Ext. 7124 
Bennett. Howard "Pete", Route 6, Mayfield. CH 7-3309, 

CH 7-3510 
Blanton, Homer, 138 New Hampshire Dr., Ashland, 324-1730, 

324-3730 
Blosser, Kermit, 80 Maplewood Dr., Athens. Ohio. LY 2-2792, 

LY 3-1011 
Bocook Earl. 1102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Bocook. George Allen, 1906 Walnut St., Kenova. W. Va. 
Boeh. William, 3804 McNichoIas, Deer Park, Ohio, SY 1-8880, 

PO 1-1876 
Boeing, Charles F., 3959 Delmar, Cincinnati 11. Ohio, MO 1-7032 
Boemker. Bob. 69 Thompson Ave., So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-1708, 

PA 1-2700 Ext. 350 
Bonner. John C, 5335 Buckner Ave., Louisville, EM 8-2222, 

EM 3-9902 
Bordy, Philip, 3308 Stratford Ave.. Louisville 18, GL 8-7005, 

JU 4-0459 
Bowman. Earl G. "Dick". 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

6-8111, 2-3343 
Boyles, Jerry F., 2700 Algonquin, Ashland. 324-6995. 324-1111 
Brandenburg, Donald E., 714 Exeter Ave., Middlesboro. 1139 
Brichler. Joe A.. 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, KI 1-6049, 

PA 1-1984 
Briscoe, Edward D.. Jr.. 3721 Taylorsville Rd.. Louisville, 

GL 1-9898, JU 3-6671, Ext. 422 
Brizendine. Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville. GL 4-6843, 

JU 7-9111 
Brown. Bill, 1725 Quarry Hill Rd.. Louisville, GL 8-4857, 

JU 4-1890 
Brotzge, Maurice J.. 3800 W. Broadway. Louisville. TW 3-7206, 

SP 6-2506 
Bullock. Teddy. 148 Arcadia. Lexington, 4-4200 
Bunn, Gary, 2718 1st Street, Huntington, W. Va. 
Burke, Daniel F.. 1115 Maureen Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

GR 1-9631, MA 1-7411 
Burton, John, 1302 Central Ave., Ashland, 324-5964, 324-1111 

Ext. 349 
Burton, James. Ed.. 401 Barbour St.. Providence. MO 7-2296 
Cain, Paul D.. 3196 Lookout Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 1- 

7246, AV 1-9740 
Caldwell, Charles M., 2790 Latulla Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Caiman. E. C, Jr., 1124 Washington. Sturgis, 2100, 5545 
Campbell. John J., 1400 Hillcrest, Fulton, 1773, 130 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218, 

JU 7-8862 
Carlson, David A.. 2916 Washington, Paducah, 444-7943. 444. 

6311 Ext. 769 
Carroll, James L.. Lincoln Ave.. Paintsville. 789-3601. 789-4066 
Carroll, Thomas J.. 1725 Devondale Dr.. Louisville. TW 5-8478, 

EM 7-6111 
Carswell, Rev. Ernest L.. Jr., P. O. Box 301. Boston, Lebanon 

Junction TE 3-4848 
Gathers, Bob, P. O. Box 158, Corbin, 1338, 465 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, PL 3-5367, PL 3-3245 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Ft. Thomas. HI 1-8427, 

DU 1-1480 
Chattin, Ernie, 2147 Central, Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 



Louisville 14. EM 



Chesher, Paul E.. 6583 Brue< 

JU 4-1898 
Cisco, Robert Dale. 1270 Scoville Rd., Lexington. 6-5343, 2-2626 
Clark, Bill W., 3839 Court Ave., Paducah. 442-2205, 444-6311 
Clinard, Fred L., 1102 Snow Ave., Madison, Tennessee, 

TW 5-2437, AL 6-7235 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr., 2554 Southview Dr., Lexington, 

7-3672, 2-8205 
Corea, Frank, Box 462, Williamson, W. Va. 
Corrao, Philip J. 2321 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Indiana, 

WH 4-9990, WH 4-3912 
Coudret, Raymond J., Jr.. 3704 Conlin, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4259, HA 5-3339 
Cowan, Robert L., 628 So. 43rd, Louisville, SP 8-3360, SP 6- 

1436 
Cox, William J., 148 Holly, Pineville, ED 7-3209, Harlan 721 
Craft, Albert B.. 345 Glendale Ave.. Lexington, 4-5365, 5-0960 
Craft, Bill, 638 Longview, Lexington, 7-4843, 4-9223 
Crager. Bobby F., Prestonsburg 
Creasey, Fred, P. O. Box 11, Sebree 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., 1236 76th Street, North, St. Peters- 
burg. Fla.. 344-6361. 5-2151 
Crouch. Jack J., 463 Villa Dr., Evansville, Indiana, GR 6-4892 
Crum, Edward E., 2136 East Lane. Louisville 16, EM 8-8197. 

ME 7-7621 Ext. 203 
Cubbon. George C, 3900 Venable Ave., Charleston, W. Va. 
Gulp, Willard E., Hqts., 326th Eng. Bn.. Ft. Campbell, 4622, 

4048 
Curnutte, James R., 201 E. 8th Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Current, Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Dr., Lexington. 7-1049. 

6-4660 
Dahlander. Ward M.. 507 Indian Ridge Rd.. Louisville 7, 

TW 5-6273. JU 5-2366 
Dallniann. James W., 12 Center St.. Jeffersonville. Indiana, 

BU 3-7255 
Daniel, Ernest H., 810 23rd St.. Ashland. 324-2783. 324-1155 

Ext. 527 
Daum. Charles A.. 216 Christ Rd., Evansville 10, Indiana, 

HA 4-0217, HA 2-8805 
Davenport, Sam C Jr., P. O. Box 7. Jellico, Tennessee, 434- 

6400. 424-6555 
Davidson, Norman L., 7617 E. Manslick Rd., Louisville. Cedar 

9-7811. ME 4-1681 Ext. 42G 
Davis, Clyde E., 2631 E. Euclid. Ashland, 324-7804, 325-7151. 

324-7145 
Davis. Ralph C. 604 N. 4th St.. Ironton. Ohio. VE 2-8606. 

VE 2-8143 
Davis. William P.. 1003 Sth St.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Deaton. Dan. Matewan. W. Va. 
DeMuth. Paul E., 7510 Westdale Rd.. Louisville, 893-2655, 

SP 8-4421 Ext. 348 
Denton. Charles. 1427 Clay. Henderson. VA 6-4020. VA 6-3195 
Deutsch. T. E.. Jr.. 1144 Paxton, Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 1-4339, 

UN 1-4000. PL 1-6161 
Dial, Charles R., 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf. William H., Jr., 1487-B Werner Park. Fort Campbell, 

6144, 3210 
DiMuzio, Robert, 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati 39, Ohio. 

KI 1-2220, MA 1-9256 
Dizney, H. A., 206 4th, Corbin 

Downey, Robert F., 327 26th St., Dunbar. W. Va. 
Drake, Richard R,. 61 Edwards Court, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-4235 
Durkin, Jack H.. 291 Burke Road. Lexington. 4-4396, 4-1717 
Eastham, Everett, Jr., Route 1. Kenova, W. Va. 
Edelen, Ben R., 3202 Klondike Lane. l,ouisville, GL 4-3518. 

GL 2-2611 
Elliott, Carroll L.. 214 Sunset Rd.. Elizabethtown. RO 5-4007, 

RO 5-6118 
Ellspermann, George A.. 3924 Joan Ave.. Evansville. Indiana. 

GR 6-5693 HA 4-7741 
Elovitz. Carl. 1920 Spring Grove. Lexington. 7-3994, TR 3-4901 
Engle. Orville, 128 Oak St.. Pineville, 7-2916 
Ensslin, Thomas F., 160 Cochran Rd.. Lexington. 6-2955 
Ernst, Edward R.. Box 68, Hebron, 689-7181. 921-8336 
Falls. Wm. M., Sr., 122 Liberty Street, Hopkinsville, TU 6-2436, 

TU 5-8278 
Fandrich. William. Route 4. Murray. PL 3-3193, PL 3-3193 
Farley. Ken. 333 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 3-2514 
Faust, Jack, 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville. ME 7-2043 (Bus.) 
Feix, Darl W.. Miller Court, Cynthiana, 1756-J. 179 
Fletcher, John L.. 5723 B Brown. Ft. Knox. 4-2079. 4-2052 
Florence. Robert H., 2722 Trimble St.. Paducah. 444-7489,. 

444-6311 
Forbes. J. W., Jr., 208 Granvil Dr., Louisville. GL 4-6025, 

SP 8-2731 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckinridge Lane. Louisville, GL 

8-1079. JU 2-3511 Ext. 472 
Foster, Berryman E., 927 Waverly Dr.. Lexington. 3-1827, 

2-7847 
Foster, J. W., 821 Carneal Rd.. Lexington, 4-8058. 3-3335 
Fraley, Bill, 407 Monterrey. Owensboro. MU 4-4663. MU 3-1656 
Franklin, James A.. 3229 Holt St.. Ashland, 325-3934, 324-1111 

Ext. 481 
Franklin. Robert, Marion, 5-4650, 5-4226 
Freese. Ollie, 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Fruit, William, 2015 N. Elm. Henderson, VA 7-3540 
Fryrear, Bill P. 1564 Baldwin. Bowling Green. VI 2-0088. 

VI 2-4411 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Fugate, E. Hugh. Price. FR 7-2911, Frestonsburg TU 6-6261 
Funkhouser, Roy A., P. O. Box 16, Herndon, Hopkinsville 

886-1923, Ft. Campbell 2422 
Gammon. William H.. 802 Clara, Ashland, 324-6619, 324-1111 

Ext. 575 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 2-5494 
Gibson, Fred W.. 738 1st Street, Henderson, VA 6-9416, VA 

6-9416 
Gilligan. Jack. 1146 Tassie Lane. Cincinnati, Ohio. JA 2-2042 
Gluszek, Henry, Lynch, 2598 

Golden, Billy Joe, 568 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512. 848-2512 
Gour, Robert A., 233 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 3-9582, 

VI 2-0341 Ext. 241 
Gourley. Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6191, HA 3-4016 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St.. Pineville, ED 7-3,331, ED 7-2392 
Grady. Clarence O., 420 N. Main, Marion, 705-3131 
Graham. James. 2601 Elm. Ashland, 4-8169, 4-1155 Ext. 376 
Greene, Omar Paul. 2244V. Harris, Norvrood, Ohio. 531-8996, 

351-5142 
Greene. Paul "Dutch", 1336 Grandview Dr., Ashland, 324-9216, 

324-5161 
Griggs, John M.. 615 Freeman Dr., Lexington, 2-7989, 2-7989 
Gruneisen, Sam J., 1101 Samuel St., Louisville, ME 4-9964, 

ME 5-6391 
Hadden. Newell P.. Jr.. 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington. 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagan, Joe. 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, GL 8-1325, 

Seneca Hi 
Hagerman. Bart. 2942 Hampton St.. Ashland, 325-4227, 324-1111 

Ext. 661 
Hagy. Harold J.. 715 Grant St.. Charleston. W. Va. 
Hale, Don C. 146 Loraine Ct.. Berea, 986-4372 
Hanes, Edward C. 1508 Ridgecrest, Bowling Green, VI 3-3432, 

VI 2-0089 
Harris, John C. Plainview Dr., Madisonville, TA 1-2462, 

TA 1-2462 
Harris. Russell. 368 Boiling Spring. Lexington, 4-6525 
Harrod, Robert. 129 Camden Ave., Versailles, TR 3-3797, 

TR 3-3691 
Hatfield, Dennis. 1610 May St.. Covington, HE 1-4234 
Hatfield, Gene E.. Country Club Courts, Fulton, 1274, Paducah 

442-1649 
Hawkins, Robert W., 610 Echo Lane, Madisonville, TA 1-6918, 

TA 1-2990 
Heinold. Jack. 5739 Wielert Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, LI 2-1431, 

MA 1-1901 
Heinze. Frank, 204 Maple Ave., Frestonsburg. TU 6-2436 
Heinze. John G. 39 Highland Ave., Frestonsburg, TU 6-2195, 

TR 4-2119 
Hellard, George D., Jr.. 572 Longview Drive, Lexington, 7-2643, 

3-0484 
Hertzberger, Robert, 2736 Marion, Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 4-1681. HA 5-6211 
Hoferer, Louis R.. 4833 Corinth Ave., Cincinnati 17, Ohio, 

RE 1-8430. WA 1-9841 
Holeman. D. Fletcher. 329 . Poplar St., Dawson Springs, 

SW 7-2302. SW 7-4241 
Heinold. F. Thomas. 6916 Terrylynn, Cincinnati 39. Ohio, 

LI 2-1125. ME 1-5750 
Hill. Earl F., Route 1. Box 49-A, London, 4-2621 
Hofstetter, Joe. Box 2173, Willamson, W. Va. 
Holbrook. William. 2421. Forest Ave., Ashland, 324-5850, 

324-2144 
Holman. S. T.. 207 2nd St., Corbin. 2762, 283 
Huber, Carl, W.. 125 N. 37th Street. Louisville 12, SP 4-3387 
Hsber. Jerry, 2873 W. McMicken. Cincinnati, Ohio, MU 1-0897 

HE 1-6346 
Hughes. Robert E.. 400 Briggs St.. Russellville. 6-6334. 6-6336 
Huiet. F. "Whitey", 7327 Osceola Dr., Maderia 43. Ohio. 

LO 1-9239. CH 1-4768 
Hulsey. Donald. 1222 E. Delaware, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

5-3677, WO 3-3124 
Hunter. Charles. Evarts, 542. 77 

Hyland. John L.. 7 Fryer Dr.. Henderson, VA 7-3318, VA 6-9421 
Hynson. Fred R., 441 Kingsway Dr.. Lexington, 6-4285 
Idol. Billy Joe. 124 Leafwood Rd.. Middlesboro, 397 
.Jackson, Dennis M.. 121 Spruce, Murray. PL 3-5116. PL 3-5016 
James. Gene. 315 Park Ave.. Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-6976, JE 2-7724 
Jarrell. Frank, Box 46, Ceredo. W. Va. 
Jenkins. Kean. 210 Morningside. Elizabethtown, RO 5-4887, 

RO 6-6247 
Johnson, Frank W., 224 S. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, RO 6-6021, 

RO 5-4606 
Johnson. Harry A., Jr.. 348 Friedman Ave., Paducah, 443-1767, 

444-6311 Ext. 361 
Jones. J. Carl. 2638 Southview Dr., Lexington. 7-1941. 2-8080 
Jones, Paul, 314 Park Lane. Elizabethtown, RO 5-4502 
Jones. William A.. 242 Farwood Dr., Paducah, 443-7464, 443- 

4508 
Kathman, Bemie, 3060 Elmwood Dr., So. Ft. Mitchell. DI 1-7369, 

MA 1-7541 
Kauffman. Victor C. 3635 W. 8th St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

WA 1-9230. MO 1-8800 
Kemper. Russ. 6732 Lauderdale, Cincinnati, Ohio, WE 1-6222, 

MA 1-4380 
Kerr, Kenneth, 10806 Grafton Hall Rd., Valley Station, WE 

7-3008, JU .6-4000 
Kessel, Harry R., 407 Elmwood Place, Athens, Ohio, LY 3-4283 



Kimble, Frank, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 

King, Allen, 223 Barker Rd., Henderson, VA 6-9647, VA 6-33Z1 

Kraesig. Charles F., Route 1, Marengo, Indiana, Milltown ME 

3-4842, Louisville. EM 6-0326 
Kyle, Leslie G.. Jr.. 25 Chalfonte PI.. Fort Thomas. HI 1-8601, 

KI 1-2622 
Lally, James J.. 4799 Guerley Rd.. Cincinnati. Ohio, GR 1-7282 
Lamb. Billy J.. Box 232. Junction City, Danville 1420 (Bus.) 
Lambert, Irvin G., 6110 Rural, Louisville, WO 9-4718, GL 8-1948 
Lambert, Kenneth L., 2221 Bayard Pk. Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6146. HA 6-5252 
Lancaster. Morris B., 204 Barberry Lane, Lexington 
Lawson, Leland, 949 Deporres, Lexington. 4-1009, 2-3044 
Lenahan, Thomas F., 3107 Doreen Way, Louisville. GL 8-4490, 

JU 2-8696 
Lewis, Horace N.. 1907 Hall Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Lewis. Jesse O. D.. Box 202, Proctorville. Ohio, 6-6890, HA 

9-1381 Ext. 258 
Lewis, Richard Q.. 409 W. 1st, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4032 
Liber, James, 39 Glen Este PI., Cincinnati 17, Ohio. AV 1-3686, 

WE 1-8900 
Lloyd. Julius C. 6820 Apt. A. Fort Carson, Colo. 
Longenecker. David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville. TW 6-9071, 

TW 5-3401 Ext. 301-302 
Looney, Clifton, 1602 Walnut St., Kenova. W. Va. 
Lowe. Eugene T- Route 1, Box 12. London. VO 4-5724, VO 

4-2207 
Lowe Stan. Box 337, Russellville, PA 6-6647, Nashville, Tenn. 

CY 7-6521 
Lucas, Gene T.. 100 Lemons Mill Rd.. Georgetown. 1371 
Lucas. Thomas L., Jr.. 2128 Clinton PI. E., Owensboro, MU 

4-6466, MU 3-2401 Ext. 480 
McClure. James B.. Route 1. South Point. Ohio, DR 7-4282 
McDade, C. F.. 918 6th Ave.. St. Albans, W. Va. 
McHenry. Louis P.. 408iA Main St., Hopkinsville, TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-2813 
McGehee, Gordon, 4529 Carroll. Covington. CO 1-6880 
McGlasson, Eugene M., 1800 Brentmoor Lane, Anchorage, 

CH 6-8554 (Bus.) 
McKinney, Adelle F., 6370 G Fisher Ave.. Fort Knox. 4-6169, 

4-4836 
McLemore, Jack T.. 4531 Riverview Ave., Louisville 11, SP 

4-5206 (Bus.) 
McMullan, Cecil E.. Route 2. Golden Pond, WA 4-5604 
Makepeace. William H.. 1010 Catawba Valley. Cincinnati 26, 

Ohio. EA 1-4042. EA 1-4949 
Malone. Donald R.. 2530 So. 13th. Ironton. Ohio. 532-4086, 

632-6224 
Marsili. Lee A.. 1045 Gao Branch. Lynch. 848-6673. 848-6673 
Martin. Bill, 307 Clav, Erlanger. DI 1-8472. MA 1-0130 
Matarazzo. S. M.. 320 N. Mulberry. Elizabethtown. RO 5-5689, 

Fort Knox 4-7019 
Mathis : Curtis W.. 109 Third St.. Harlan. 702, 1206 
Mautz. Richard M., 1622 Md. Prkwy.. Ashland. 324-8964 
May, E. B., Jr.. Box 185, Frestonsburg. TU 6-2314. TU 6-8661 
May, Robert M.. Student Det., USA-Armor Scb. (2168), Fort 

Knox 
Mayes, Sidnev C. 2717 Richard St.. Hopkinsville, 886-7692, 

TU .5-8226 
Mavhugh. Robert Lee. 612 Cherrywood Dr., Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-2898. RO 5-6187 
Mavhew. William M.. Pawnee Dr. Route 3, Elizabethtown, RO 

5-2706. RO 5-6570 
Mayo. Henry L.. 581 College St.. Paintsville, 789-4465, 789-4001 
Meeks. Jack F.. 407 5th Street, Corbin, 415. 20 
Melmige. Jim Box 74, Matewan, W. Va.. HA 6-4632. HA 6-4401 
Mercke. Frank R.. 417 Lotis Way. Louisville 7. TW 6-8460, 

ME 4-9491 
Meyer, Bud. 5319 Lilibet Ct.. Cincinnati 38. Ohio, BL 1-3459, 

PA 1-4334 
Mitchell, Emmett D.. 120 Hamilton Pk.. Lexington, 5-3511, 

4-0032 
Mitchell, Vyron W.. 901 Walnut. Fulton. 1648. 30 
Millerhaus. Bill. 923 Harris. Cincinnati 5, Ohio, GR 1-7904, 

WA 1-9722 
Minton, Eugene H., 901 S. Green. Henderson, VA 7-3193 
Moore. Charles H.. 218 E. Crest Dr.. Cincinnati 15. Ohio. PO 

1-0290. VA 1-3889 
Moore. Pete. Union College. Barbourville, 6-3649 
Mordica. William. 800 Edgewood. Ashland, 324-7741 
Morris. Gene. 302 Wilson Ct.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Morrissey. Rockne. 4824 Harlow Dr.. Dayton. Ohio. CL 4-4395 
Moss. Howard A. Box 1042. Paducah. 898-3168. 442-4474 
Moss. James W.. 609 Henry Clay Blvd., Lexington, 6-0772, 

6-0772 
Mouser. H. D.. Princeton Road, Madisonville. TA 1-4864. TA 

1-2644 
Mullins. B. E.. Paintsville. 789-4610. 789-4650 
Muntan. Peter J.. 126 Woodmore Ave.. Louisville 14. EM 8-8236, 

ME 7-7621 
Murray. Thomas. 611 Edgecliff. Covington. HE 1-1929 
Mussman, Ralph. Jr.. 502 Monroe. Newport. JU 1-4562. CO 

1-1300 
Mvers. Lee E.. P. O .Box 46. Big Stone Gap. Va. 
Nau. Bill. Clark St.. Barbourville, 6-4112, 6-3057 
Neal, Gene. Davis Pike. Route 1. Batavia. Ohio, AV 1-4630, 

SK 3-6908 
Noland, Douglas, 305 Herndon, Stanford, 365-2609, 365-2G19 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Page Seven 



Nord. Bertrand J., 4205 Naomi Dr., Louisville, 969-3369, ME 

4-0561 
Nord, Ed, 1734 So. 23rd, Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401 

Ext. 202 
Nord, Gilbert, 6315 Krause, Louisville, WA 1-5363 
Okruch. Nicholas. 401 Parkland, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-3740, HA 4-3331 
Omer, Billy W., 225 Reed Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-2833 
O'Nan, Norman, Elmwood, Henderson, 7-3968, 7-3456 
O'Neal, Bud. 3628 Kelly Way, Louisville 20. GL 8-7904, TW 

5-6765 
Osborne, Ted. Bo.n 806, Lexington, 6-8390, 6-8390 
Overby, H. E., 1913 Uth Avenue N., Nashville, Tennessee 
Owens, Charles. 2660 R. Guyan Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Palmer, Carl A., 2506 So. 7th Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6244 
Parkhurst, Capt. David S.. 5855 B Demoret, Fort Knox, 4-1465 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route 2, Providence, MO 7-2524, Madisonville 

TA 1-9004 
Pate, Lloyd W., 1011 Joyce Lane, Nashville 6, Tennessee. CO 

2-2916. TW 6-5472 
Peeno, Harry R., 30 Butler. Ludlow. JU 1-7335 
Perry. A. L., USAARMC Trans. Office, Fort Knox, 4-2149 

(Bus.) 
Piper, James K., B 212 Shawneetown, Lexington, 2-9341 
Poore, William E., 729 Eversole St.. Hazard, GE 6-2484, GE 

6-4623 
Powers, Thomas J., 1920 Knollridge Lane, Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 

JA 1-0196 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-0700, EL 3-6129 
Raisor, J. T.. 990 Fredericksburg Rd., Lexington, 7-1043, 4-0304 
Rapp, Bill, 216 Heplar, Ironton, Ohio, 532-1983, 632-7242 
P.app, Lowell, 444 Richland Ave., Athens, Ohio, LY 2-1441, 

LY 3-1821 
Ray, Shirley G.. 3035 San Juan, Owensboro, MU 3-7663 
Reddington, James T., 3824 Glenside PI., Louisville 13, GL 

2-9689, SP 8-4421 
Reece, Fred, 149 Elm, Versailles, TR 3-3623, Lexington, 

7-3977 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, HI 1-4946, 

KI 1-4607-LI 2-4507 
Reinhart, Gene, 4813 Sweetser Ave., Evansville, Indiana, OR 

7-3919 
Renfro. John E., Box 298. Williamsburg. 6488 or 6808, 2721 
Rhatigan, Alfred J., 10663 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-2479, EL 1-6400 Ext. 7 
Rieman. Bob. 2004 Dallas, Cincinnati, Ohio. JA 2-3694 
Riggins, Jason, Box 2691, Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs, William T., 103 W. McElroy, Morganfield 170, Hen- 
derson VA 7-9891 
Robinson, Don, 1906i/„ Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Rogers, J. B., 832 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th. Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-4036, JE 

2-3231 
Russell, C. B., Jr., 61 Main St.. Lynch, 848-2301 
Russell, Gary E., 1024 Book St., Henderson 
Russell, Joe. Box 213. Russellville, PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
Sabato. Al, 7621 View PI. Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio. VA 1-3646, 

CA 1-6800 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 2-6036, 2-2220 

Ext. 3217 
St. Clair, James, 326 11th Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset Ave., Paducah, 442-3650 
Sapp. Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke, Louisville 20, GL 8-8989, GL 

4-7611 Ext. 2924 
Sauter, Harold S., 8608 Jenny Lind Dr., Louisville, WO 9-5381, 

EM 8-3381 Ext. 231-269 
Saylor, Deward. Box 407, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3694, 1427 
Saylor, Emanuel, Green Street, Loyall, 1140, 2620 
Schad, James, 10717 Chelmsford, Cincinnati, Ohio, PR 1-6495 
Scharfenberger, Irv T., 7267 Jethve Lane, Cincinnati 43, Ohio, 

LO 1-6378, LO 1-6378 
Schiering, Jack H., 6948 Terrylynn Lane. Cincinnati 39. Ohio, 

MU 1-6516, WA 1-8766 
Schmitt. K. F., 710 E. Walnut, Louisville 
Schwetschenau, Paul J. 7013 Clovernoll Dr., Cincinnati 31, 

Ohio. WE 1-3548. PO 1-4100 Line 1286 
Scott. Luther. 211 Spruce St.. Murray, PL 3-4649 
Scott. W. L., 1816 McDonald. Lexington, 2-3316, 2-3595 
Seale. Frank E.. 1001 Tales Creek Rd., Lexington, 6-8545 
Scale, William E., 1001 Tales Creek Rd., Lexington, 6-8545 
Sellier, Edward F., Jr.. 136 Hamilton Park. Lexington, 3-3148 
Sellman, John B., 4031 Gilman Ave.. Louisville. TW 7-2767, 

JU 5-3393 
Shanks, Thomas E., 3210 Ainslie Way, Louisville, GL 2-9613, 

JU 4-1361 Ext. 473 
Shaw, John H., 219 E. Lee, Mayfield, CH 7-1907 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th Street, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

GR 1-1100, MU 1-3510 
Sherman, Jerry, 502 Prichard St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Showalter, John, 116 Military, Georgetown. 662, 1240 
Sinclair, George H., 7807 Joyce Drive, Louisville. WO 9-7925, 

ME 7-7621 Ext. 267 
Sizemore, Dewey, 2800 Adams, Ashland, 5-3902, 4-2144 
Sloan, Earl D., 108 Diane Ct., Madison, Tennessee. TW 5-6316 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Rd.. Louisville, TW 5-1126, TW 

7-2554 



■e., Louisville 18, GL 8-1286, 

Smith, Richard T., 2136 Clay St., Paducah, 444-6112, 444-6311 

Ext. 448 
Smith. Walter K., 1722 Melvin Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 1-9774, 

MU 1-3100 
Snyder, Gus, 2420 Adams, Ashland, 324-7927, 324-1111 Ext. 404 
Spencer, Edward H., 1149 9th Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Staples, Jerry, 1125 Loeb St., Henderson 
Steele, Charles, 544 Main Street, Lynch, 848-5972 
Stephens, Herbert D., 133 1st St. W., Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry S.. 2210 Circle Drive, Lexington, 4-9620. 

4-2431 
Stevens, William D., 1033 Claiborne, Lexington, 6-2578, 2-2220 

Ext. 3209 
Stewart, Herbert T., 330 Maple St., Hazard, 6-2438 
Strimer, Albert. 2610 Broad St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Strong, Arnett, Kentucky Blvd., Hazard. GE 6-3938, GE 6-2141 
Stump, Bennett, 2601 Grand Ave.. Parkersburg. W. Va. 
Sturgill, Barkley J., Box 366, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2477, 

TU 6-2145 
Sullivan, Don C. 3020 Dartmouth Dr., Lexington, 7-6953 

Frankfort CA 3-8221 Ext. 61 
Swinford, John M., 440 Pike St., Cynthiana, 206, 1887 
Tackett, Jay. Route 3. Georgetown, 832-6663, Stamping Ground 
Talbot, William G., Ill, Route 1, Paris, 1762 
Tarter, Edward Everett, 271 Eldorado, Louisville, 458-3606 
Taylor, D. C, Box 176, Benham, 848-5406, 848-2284 
Taylor, Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes. Murray. PL 3-4825, PL 3-5125 
Thomas, Charles, 410 E. Drive, Fulton. 1948, 665 
Thomas, Frank M.. 520 So. 10th St., Louisville 3, 583-6354, 

JU 4-9178 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga, Louisville, GL 2-9256 
Thompson. Jack, Jr., 1310 Rammers Avenue, Louisville, ME 

4-3617, JU 4-6311 
Thompson, Ralph N., 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati, 38, Ohio, BL 

1-3394 CH 1-2925 
Thurman, J. W. "Spider", 214 Bridge, Manchester, LY 8-3462, 

LY 8-2811 
Timmering, George E., 28 Welby Road, Louisville, WA 1-2148, 

ME 6-1362 
Tirey, Lt. Col. James H., U. S. Army Maint. Board, Fort Knox, 

4-3562, 4-8369 
Trautwein, J. R., 4313 Martha, Louisville. 458-7438, 454-3449 
Treas. Joe W., 609 Green St.. Fulton. 1066. 309 
Troutman. Bill. P. O. Box 265, Kenvir, 170N 
Trunzo. Nick, 1015 Elaine Dr., Louisville, WO 9-7735, GL 4-7511 

Ext. 3012 
Vallandingham, Dale, 1807 Holman, Covington, AX 1-5188 
VanGilder, Bill. 8925 Old South Park Rd., Louisville, 969-5759 
VanHoose, Jack D., Short, Paintsville, 789-4896, 789-3581 
Vankirk, Alvia S., 107 So. Poplar, Corbin 

Varner. Rav G., P. O. Box 427 12370 Roberts. Boron, California 
Vennari, Paul, Box 13, Beckley, W. Va. 
Vennell. Robert, 250 Donald Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Vinciguerra. Philip. Matewan, W. Va. 
Waide, Harry D., 503 S. Madison, Madisonville, TA 1-1998, 

TA 1-3870 
Walker, Paul R., Reservoir Hill Park. Bowling Green. VI 3-8893, 

VI 3-8326 
Wanchic, Nicholas. Route 6, Berea Rd., Lexington. 5-1233, 

Watson, Ronald L., 313 Eastwood Dr., Bedford, Indiana, BR 

9-1876, BR 9-1505 
Watts, Shirley, 802 Carneal Rd., Lexington, 5-2743. 2-5494 
Weaver, Ray, 55 Thompson, So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-3761 
Weber, David. 3707 St. Germaine, Louisville, TW 6-4298, TW 

Webb, Clayton E., 301 Sherwood Rd., Hurricane, W. Va. 
Welch, Bill. 1324 Beech, Cincinnati 5, Ohio. GR 1-8090. PA 

1-9859 
Welch, J. D., 3201 Hampton St., Ashland, 324-3337, 324-1155, 

Ext. 496 
Welch, Tom, 3932, Vine Vista PI, Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 1-8094, 

GA 1-5700 Ext. 691 
Werkowitz. Jack. 9614 Miller Rd.. Cincinnati 42, Ohio, SY 

1-6382 
Wigginton, Al, Sr.. 1037 Cecil Ave.. Louisville, SP 6-7881 
Williams, Jim, 2428 Adams. Ashland. 325-2733, 324-8282 
Willis, Barrett, Jr., 2208 W. Chestnut, Louisville, SP 8-7626 
Willis, Donald A., Allen, TR 4-2485, BU 6-3407 
Wilson, John Pope, 812 E. Main St., Louisville 6, JU 5-4691, 

TW 6-0211 
Winfrey. Shelby, 108 Holly, Berea, 986-3084, 986-3084 
Wilkerson, Benjamin P., 1509 Southfield Rd.. Evansville 15, 
William, Bert O., 988 Deparres Ave., Lexington, 4-0939. 2-2626 

Indiana, GR 6-4560, UL 3-3381 
Williams. Roy E., 304 Deepwood Dr.. Elizabethtown, RO 5-4831, 

RO 6-4191 
Wise, Jack. 408 Fountain Ave.. Georgetown, 2052, 120 
Wood, Paul, 460 Boone Trail, Danville, 236-4586, 236-4585 
Wurtz, Emil. 18 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, DU 1-1232, GR 

1-0526 
Wyatt, William J.. 209 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 2-4668, 3-2234 
Yost, Richard C. 2617 Argonne Rd.. Portsmouth. Ohio, EL 

3-6689, EL 3-6151 
Zimmer, Tom, 3530 Cherry Tree Lane, Erianger, DI 1-4566, 

HE 1-4272 



Page Eia-ht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



IN MEMORIAM 




Ralph Kimmel 

Ralph Kimmel, English instructor and 
baseball coach at the duPont Manual High 
School, Louisville, died at Mayo Clinic, 
Rochester, Minnesota, on August 5, 1961, 
after an illness of several months. 

Mr. Kimmel came to Manual as a teacher 
in the 1920's and had coached baseball there 
since 1932. His 1947, 1952, 1955, 1957, and 
1959 teams won State Championships, this 
being the best record of any high school 
baseball coach in Kentucky. He was also a 
professional baseball scout, with the Balti- 
more Orioles, the Philadelphia Phillies, and 
the Boston Red Sox. He sent scores of boys 
into professional baseball, many of them off 
the consistently fine teams he produced at 
Manual. 

The classroom of Mr. Kimmel at Manual 
was a kind of scrapbook, according to a 
friend, with pictures of Kimmel's former stu- 
dents, both baseball players and non-athletes, 
adorning the walls. Before going to the Mayo 
Clinic, Mr. Kimmel instructed the janitors at 
the school not to disturb any of the clippings 
and pictures hanging on his classroom wall. 

Mr. Kimmel was described by a rival 
coach as, "very gentlemanly, and a very 
pleasant chap both on and off the field. He 
was quiet, he didn't have m.any arguments, 
but he certainly knew how to get the most 
out of his boys." Another colleague described 
him as meticulous "in his appearance and 
meticulous in his demands in the classroom. 
But the kids loved it." 

Mr. Kimmel was graduated from Wabash, 
College, and did graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Louisville, the University of Ken- 
tucky and Georgetown College. He was a 



Shriner and a member of the Scottish Rite. 
He also was a member of Fourth Avenue 
Baptist Church. Mr. Kimmel is survived by 
two brothers. Fountain Kimmel, Jefferson- 
ville, and Lee Kimmel, Rock Island, 111. ; two 
sisters, Mrs. Mae Casper and Mrs. Lula 
Ostrich, both of Anna, 111., and several nieces 
and nephews. 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the LIniversity of Kentucky Department of Exten- 
sion. The Code letters "e, j, s. c, a," refer to element- 
ary, junior hi?h, senior high, college and adult 
audiences who may enjoy the particular film listed. 
The rental prices shown do not apply to schoolr, which 
use one of the special subscription service plans, 
offered by the Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Football 
BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, 
$1..50. 

Fundamentals of ball handling are stressed; 
stance, grip, "feel" of tlie ball, finger-tip control, 
adjustment before throwing or kicking, receiving 
passes from center or from a back, catching passes 
and punts, ways of carrying ball, and changing from 
one hand to another. Game shorts are presented, using 
slow motion and stop action techniques, and superim- 
posed animation to illustrate principles. 
BETTER FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, .3 vs-els, .$.7.5 

This film, made by the Official Sports Film Ser- 
vice and recommended by the National Federation, 
includes game situations and their relation to the 
rules. Movie and T. V. actor Bill Frawley is the 
coach of a team which learns "the hard way" why 
knowledge of the rules is important. The film is 
instructional for coaches, officials and players, and 
has enough entertaining value for school assemblies 
and service clubs. 
BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fundamentals of good blocking are taught in this 
film: position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, 
and body control. Describes shoulder and body blocks, 
demonstrating several varieties of these. Importance 
of good physical conditions, practice, and experience 
are emphc.sized. Special photography used to illustrate 
different points. 

FOOTBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$.75 

In the film an extrovert "Old Grad" chooses 
football Rules as quiz show category. His experience 
with official interpretations proves interesting, 
humorous and embarrasing. At the end, he realizes 
his knowledge is very meager on such things as — 
officials and their duties — what constitutes pass 
interference — rights on muffed punt — etc., and 
his wife had to take over for him. 
FOOTBALL GAMES OF UK, j-s-c-a, 3 reels each, 
$.75 

Several old football films showing University of 
Kentucky in such games as Cotton Bowl, Sugar Bowl, 
etc., have been placed in the library for those who 
wish to use them. 
GAME OF GAMES, j-s-c-a, IV2 reels, $2.50 

The highlights of the 1946 Army-Navy football 
game are presented in slow motion. It is filmed by 
"official" photographer of the Athletic Association 
of the U. S. Naval Academy. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Page Nine 



OFFICIAL FOOTBALL, ,i-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This film portrays the play situations covering 
the basic rules of football as played under the 
National Alliance Code. The theme is centered around 
the official interpretations of the rules as they apply 
to the three teams always present on the field, the 
home team, the visiting team and that all important 
third team, the officials. 
TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Tackling properly is shown as the result of 
application of certain fundamentals: good physical 
condition, speed, body placement, drive, sure grip, 
timing, and body control. Shoulder and cross body 
tackles are demonstrated in various ways, with 
special instructions for safety and means of a re- 
ducing shock. 



New Publications 

SPECTATOR SPORTSMANSHIP — American 
Association for Health, Physical Education, and Rec- 
reation, 1201 Sixteenth St., N. W., Washington 6, 
D. C; 80p., $1.50. 

The increased growth of sports with wide specta- 
tor appeal has created a serious problem for educators. 
In fact, spectator behavior at our secondary school 
athletic events across the Nation has placed many 
sport programs in jeopardy. This problem, according to 
Spectator Sportsmanship, a nev.' 80-page booklet 
from the American Association for Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation, is forcing some of our 
schools to find new ways of controlling spectator con- 
duct, even through the poor sportsmanship often 
stems from members of the non-school community. 

In addition to defining the Nation's sportsman- 
ship deficiencies is plainer terms than most of us 
would like to accept. Spectator Sportsmanship offers 
both sound and practical solutions to the problem. It 
offers help to all of those involved in interscholastic 
athletics, with special suggestions for the school ad- 
ministrator, athletic director, coach, players, officials, 
student council, cheerleaders, and the sports editor. 
A final section of the booklet is devoted to sports- 
manship codes, ratings, tests, and the role of the 
state athletic association. 

TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF ATH- 
LETIC INJURIES, 1961 EDITION — Dr. Joseph 
P. Dolan, Interstate Printers and Publishers, Inc., 
Danville, Illinois; 472p., $5.50. 

Almost everyone in the field of physical education 
is undoubtedly familiar with the First Edition of Dr. 
Dolan's book, for it has long been a standard in this 
field. Probably every coach, every trainer, and every 
physical educator has his own personal copy, much 
used and well worn by now. Many colleges from 
coast to coast have adopted TREATMENT AND 
PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES as a class 
text for coaching and physical education majors. This 
new Second Edition of TREATMENT AND PRE- 
VENTION OR ATHLETIC INJURIES is completely 
up-to-date, 90 pages bigger, with many new illustra- 
tions, plus a new chapter on MENTAL HYGIENE IN 



ATHLETICS AND TRAINING. A most useful 
glossary has also been added. The book is packed 
with all of the latest information and techniques that 
coaches, trainers, and physical educators generally 
must know to keep abreast of this critical responsi- 
bility. 

The Chapter titles show the complete coverage 
of this book. They are as follows: Mental Hygiene in 
Athletics and Training; Massage in Athletics; Massage 
for Specific Athletic Injuries; The Foot and Ankle; 
The Shin, Knee, and Thigh; The Shoulder, Arm, and 
Hand; The Chest and Abdomen; The Back; The Skin 
and Athletic Considerations; The Head and Pace; 
Drugs, Dressings, and Physical Therapy Agents in 
Athletics; Nutrition for Athletics; Psychology and 
the Trainer; Guidance in Training. 

Athletic injuries to our students are becoming 
increasingly important; not only do we wish to pro- 
tect the young participants from injury for their own 
sake, but serious injuries are more and more begin- 
ning to carry a threat of personal-liability suits 
against the coaches and the schools by parents who 
charge contributory negligence as a cause of their 
son's injuries. The best insurance is to prevent injuries 
from happening in the first place, and the next best 
is knowing what to do when unavoidable injuries do 
occur. Dr. Dolan is an authority in this field; he is 
kept busy traveling about the nation to speak not 
only before groups of coaches and physical educators, 
but of medical groups as well. In fact, many phsieians 
have purchased copies of this book. 

U. K. Coaching School 



The Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation contributed to the 1961 University 
of Kentucky Coaching School, held in Lex- 
ington on August 9-12. The Association was 
in charge of the baseball and track clinics, 
and cooperated with the Kentucky State 
Medical Association, the Kentucky Advisory 
School Health Council, and the University of 
Kentucky At'^letic Association in presenting 
the Athletic Injury Prevention Conference. 

Baseball Conch Harry Lancaster of the 
University of Kentucky headed a panel 
which included Coach Briscoe Inman of 
Centre College, Supt. Ralph Dorsey of the 
Caverna Independent School District, Jack 
Hicks of the Owensboro High School, and 
Coach Bill Harrell of the Shelby County 
Higlh School. 

The track clinic was conducted by Ath. 
Dir. John Heber of the Henry Clay High 
School. He was assisted by Coach Bernie 
Sadosky of the Highlands High School, 
Coach Tom Ecker of the Elizabethtown High 
School and Dave Franta, former U. K. track 
star. 

Dr. Carroll L. Witten, of Louisville, 
headed the Athletic Injury Prevention Con- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



ference. He was assisted by Dr. John L. Wil- 
ford and Dr. James E. Skaggs, of Louisville 
and by Dr. Owen B. Murphy and Dr. George 
M. Gumbert, Jr., of Lexington. 



Football Mouth Protectors 

The 1961 National Alliance Football Rules 
strongly recommend tliat, for maximum protection, 
each player should wear a "fitted-flexible mouth and 
tooth protector." The rules provide that, in 1962, it 
will be mandatory for each player to wear such a 
protector. 

To determine what types of mouth and tooth 
protectors meet the rule specifications, a Sub-Com- 
mittee was appointed and, on July 1 and 2, 1961, met 
at French Lick, Indiana to formulate a statement. 
Two representatives of the dental profession were in- 
vited and attended the meetings of the Sub-Committee 
as resource persons. 

The Sub-Committee adopted the following state- 
ment: "Each player shall wear an intra-oral fitted- 
flexible mouth and tooth protector containing an 
impression of the individual's upper or lower teeth or 
a combination of the upper and lower teeth. This 
mouth piece shall be: (1) constructed and fitted to 
the individual by impressing his teeth into the mouth 
and tooth protector itself; or (2) constructed from a 
model made from an impression of the individual's 
teeth; or (3) a dental guard approved by a component 
dental society for use in its area of jurisdiction." A 
component society is a local or district society such 
as a county organization. 

Dentists all over Kentucky have been alerted 
concerning the 1962 rule relative to mouth protectors, 
and are offering their services to high school admin- 
istrators and coaches in an effort to solve the problem 
involved. A part of the I'ecent Athletic Injury Con- 
ference held in Lexington was devoted to the sub- 
ject, "Keep that Grin." Many Kentucky squads are 
now being equipped with dental protectors for the 
forthcoming 1961 football season. In a recent meeting, 
the dentists of Shelbyville offered a mouth protective 
program to the coaches of Shelbyville High School and 
Shelby County Hig'h School. The dentists agreed to 
donate their office time and cost in order that city 
and county athletes could obtain the mouth protector 
recommended by the American Dental Association. 
This program was the first of its kind in the state 
on a community basis reported to the K.H.S.A.A. 
The Shelbyville dentists called attention to the con- 
clusions of a report which had been made in 1960 by 
the Joint Committee on Moutli Protectors of the 
A.A.H.P.E.R. and the A.D.A. The conclusions of the 
report of a comparative evaluation of all of the 
available mouth pz'otectors were as follows: 

1. Injuries to the mouth and teeth continue to 
occur dming football games and practice even though 
some protection is afforded through the use of face 
guards. 

2. Although many schools are providing mouth 
pi'otectors for football players still many athletes are 
without this protection. 

.3. Properly fitted mouth protectors, worn by the 
players during practice and games, will prevent nearly 
all injui'ies to the teeth and mouth. 

4. Several types of mouth protectors are currently 
available. Each will afford a significant amount of 
protection if used. 

5. Player acceptance of mouth protectors depends 



on several factors: fit, personal comfort, retention, 
effect on speech, and breathing are the most important. 

6. Custom-made, individually fabricated mouth 
guards have been found to be most effective and to 
have greatest player acceptance. 

The dentists of Shelbyville expect to fabricate 
approximately one hundred mouth protectors for both 
the city and county squads combined. The coaches 
were pleased that the dentists are volunteering their 
services to equip the teams v/ith protectors this season, 
one year before the mouth protectors would become a 
part of football equipment. The dentists are hoping 
that dentists in other communities will provide such 
a program to their athletes throughout the state. 

FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

14. Play: Bl charges into neutral zone causing 
Al to break .3-point stance. No contact is made. Bl 
gets back onside and sets for one second before snap. 

Ruling: If, in the Official's judgment, action of 
Bl deceived Al or hindered him. Bl may be penalized 
for encroachment. The action by Bl may have upset 
the timing of A and probably did change the time of 
snap. Whether there is encroachment in this play is a 
judgment decision. It is not intended to mean that B 
can make a false start. B can only encroach, which is 
what may happen if B's act throws A off balance. If 
the charge of Bl causes Al to move in order to pro- 
tect himself or causes him to move in a reactionary 
motion, B's action can be considered encroachment. 

15. Play: Field Judge, Umpire and Head Lines- 
man concur that Bl intercepted forward pass. Referee, 
who was 35 yards from the particular action, con- 
tends ball was caught on 1st bounce (trapped). 

Rulling: "If there is a difference of opinion, 
testimony or interpretation, the Referee shall make 
the final decision." This statement is included in the 
responsibility and procedures of officials and, there- 
fore, would give Referee the authority to overrule 
the other officials. However, in the case cited, if the 
Field Judge, Umpire and Head Linesman were in 
good positions to see the play, the Referee, it seems, 
would be using better judgment if he accepted their 
combined decisions. 

16. Play: Rl attempts to catch scrimmage-kick 
beyond the line and muffs ball. Kl, who makes no 
attempt to reach or recover ball, blocks R2 following 
the muff so as to prevert R2 from catching or re- 
covering the muff. 

Ruling: Legal block. After Rl has muffed ball, 
it is permissible for Kl to block R2. As provided in 
last sentence of Rule 9-1-1, any player on either 
Offense or Defense may block, provided it is not 
forward pass interference, fair catch interference 
nor a personal foul. If Kl had blocked R2 prior to 
touching of ball by Rl, it would be ruled fair catch 
interference. 

17. Play: Rl signals for fair catch. He muffs 
ball and while it is in the air after the muff, K2 
blocks Rl. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. K may 
legally block R after kick has been touched by R. 
Prohibition of not touching R is removed after the 
kick is touched by R. The fair catch signal pi-ovides 
protection only if ball is caught prior to touching 
by K. No protection is given R if he attempts a 
catch and then muffs the ball because, in this case, 
R has had an opportunity to make a catch but failed 
to do so. However, if he has sigTialed and then does 
muff and catch the ball, he has made a fair catch if 
K has not touched the ball. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



Page Eleven 



18. Play: Rl, in his end zone, makes a valid 
fair catch signal and then catches K's punt while the 
ball is (a) behind R's goal line; or (b) in the field of 
play. 

Ruling: Touchback in (a). Fair catch in (b). 

19. Play: Rl, in the end zone or in the field of 
play, signals for a fair catch and: (a) catches; or 
(b) R2 catches K's punt between the goal lines. 

Ruling: In (a), it is a fair catch but in (b), it 
is not a fair catch but the ball is dead. However, 
clock is not stopped. If K had the opportunity to 
see the signal in either (a) or (b), the catcher of 
the kick may not be tackled. 

20. Play: Bl, in his end zone, intercepts a for- 
ward pass by Al. Bl attempts a return-kick from 
just inside his end line. The kick is short and A2, who 
is also in B's end zone, signals for a fair catch. A2: 
(a) catches the kick; or (b) blocked by B2; or (c) 
is pushed or held by B3; or (d) muffs the kick 
which rolls to B's 10 yardline, where B4 recovers it. 

Ruling: Touchdown in (a). Blocking by B2 is 
legal in (b). In (c), if A accepts the penalty for the 
illegal use of hands or holding by B, it is a safety. 
In (d), it is B's ball at the spot of decovei-y, 1st 
and 10. 

21. Play: 2nd and 5 on A's 10. Al advances ball 
and, during the run, B2 goes out-of-bounds on the 20 
yardline, returns to the field and then tackles Al on 
A's 40. 

Ruling: Illegal participation by B2. 15-yard pen- 
alty is measured from end of run. A's ball, 1st and 10, 
on B's 45 yardline. 

THE CAVANA AWARD 

Late in May an announcement concerning the first 
M. J. Cavana Memorial Swimming Achievement Award 
was sent to some one hundred principals of K. H. S. A. 
A. member schools who, from information received in 
the State Office, might be interested in entering their 
schools in competition for the award. 

Swimming achievement will be measured during 
the period beginning June 1, 1961, and ending January 
15, 1962. Schools will receive points for non-swimmers 
learning to swim, pupils acquiring proficiency in styles 
of swimming, pupils holding ,n;rrent certificates in 
life saving, having a school s^vir■^ming team, and en- 
tering a team in the State High School Swimming- 
Meet. Points will be given for each of the items men- 
tioned, based on the percentage of the student body 
achievement in most of the items. Tabulations and 
checks will be made by members of the school staff, 
and the principal will certify to the accuracy of the 
statistics which will be presented to the State Office 
in the event the school is entered m the competition. 

Twelve principals to date have indicated that they 
will enter their schools in the competition, and it is 
hoped that many others will advise the Commissioner 
that they want their schools to be considered when 
the ratings are being determined. It is the considered 
opinion of the State Swimming Committee and of 
the members of the Board of Control that competition 
for the Cavana Memorial Award will create more 
interest in high school swimming. The award will be 
a trophy, and will be given each year. After the first 
year the period of measuring the achievement will 
begin on January 15 and end one year later. 



MEMORIAL SERVICE 

Executive Secretary Albert Willis of the Illinois 
High School Association conducted a memorial service 
during the recent National Federation Annual Meeting 
for athletic association friends and co-workers who 
have passed away since the last annual meeting. They 
are: 

J. F. (Jim) Jiacoletti, Executive Secretary of the 
Wyoming High School Activities Association, who 
died suddenly on August 15, 1960, while attending the 
annual football rules meeting in Chicago. 

Prior Evans, a member of the National Alliance 
Football Rules Committee and outstanding official in 
Arkansas, who died on March 13, 1961, while officiat- 
ing a game in the N. A. I. A. basketball tournament, 
Kansas, City. 

Frank P. Maguire, a member of the National 
Alliance Football Rules Committee and Commissioner 
of Officials of the Pennsylvania Association, who 
died on April 25, 1961, following an illness of about a 
week resulting from a virus infection. 

Robert S. Hinshaw, Assistant Commissioner of the 
Indiana Association, who died from a heart attack at 
his home on June 3, 1961. 

Harold A. Swaffield, Executive Consultant of the 
Connecticut Interscholastic Conference, who died on 
June 19, 1961, following a prolonged illness. 
School for Basketball Officials 

The thirteenth annual School for Basketball Offic- 
ials was held at the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on 
August 13-14. The school was directed by State 
Basketball Clinic Director Charlie Vettiner. 

The services of the regional representatives who 
attended the School will be available to Association 
member schools throughout the forthcoming season. 
The men will conduct additional clinics for officials, 
coaches, and players, and will assist beginning officials 
in registration. 

The aim of the School is uniformity in officiating. 
Topics which were discussed during the three sessions 
were: rules changes and interpretation; general study 
of the rules; signal drill to secure uniform signaling of 
violations, fouls, etc.; floor technique on jump balls, 
fouls, and field goals; how to determine primary re- 
sponsibility in charging and blocking situations, for 
contact on stationary screens, and for contact on mov- 
ing screens; guarding the dribbler, and the player with 
the ball; switching, post play, rebounding, receiving a 
pass-out on a fast break, and screen play; and tips to 
officials. 

Clinic for Cheerleaders! 

The Kentucky Association of Pep Organization 
Sponsors (KAPOS) and Transylvania College will 
sponsor a clinic on Saturday, Septeniber 23, for cheer- 
leaders and their sponsors. Director of the clinic will 
be Miss Pauline Hess owner and director of Camp 
All-American, who is Cheerleader Coach at Michigan 
Staite and Executive Secretary of the United States 
Cheerleader Association. Miss Hess is bringing four 
of her precision cheerleaders with her. 

All sponsors will be guests of the Transylvania 
Athletic Association for lunch. There wiU be a style 
show for the cheerleaders, and a chance to visit on 
the College campus. 

Each principal of a K. H. S. A. A. member school 
has received a leitter, giving the details of the clinic. 

The Date September 23 

The Time 8:30-4:00 

Registration Fee $2.00 per person 

McAllister Auditorium Transylvania College 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1961 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



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School Representative 
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Phone Triangle 3-3623 

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Football Examinstion 

Part II of the National Federation Football Ex- 
amination for Officials will be o^iven in Kentucky on 
Monday, September 25.- An official who has been 
registered for at least one year prior to the current 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rating. Officials who hold the "approved" 
rating in football are required to make a minimum 
percentage grade of 80 in order to maintain this rating 
from year to year. Officials who hold the "certified" 
rating keep this rating by attending one or more 
clinics each year. Eligible officials who wish to take 
the test should write the State Off'ce. 
1961-62 Insurance Subsidy 

As reported in the May issue of the ATHLETE, 
the Board of Control voted that the insurance subsidy 
for each K. H. S. A. A. member school be the same 
for 1961-62 as that for 1960-61, namely, a basic amount 
of $30.00 with an additional subsidy of $30.00 for 
schools maintaining football. School administrators 
wishing to take advantage of the subsidy may write 
to the State Office for reimbursement forms. Some of 
the companies with which Kentucky schools place 
their insurance business give the schools credit for 
the amounts due and bill the Association for these 
amounts. The reimbursement plan f\nd the credit plan 
are both satisfactory. 

Football Districts 

The Board of Control has established two districts 
in Football Region 4, Class AA, and two in Football 
Region 2, Class AAA, for 1961. The two district win- 
ners will play for the regional championship on the 
weekend before the Class AA semi-final games and 



the Class AAA final game, which will be played on 
November 17 or 18. The Dickinson Rating System will 
be used to determine the district winners. Each team's 
rating will be based on all games played against 
teams in its own class and region rather than against 
teams in its own district only. A team must compete 
against at least four teams within its region in order 
to be eligible for a district charnpicnship. 

A Football Toast 

Oh, the full-back bows to the cheering crowd, 

And the halves, and the guartcr, too. 
And the praise ascends to the plucky ends 

Who fight for the red or blue; 
To none so great do I dedicate 

This poor little verse of mine — 
But here's to those in the fighting rows, 

To the men who hold the line! 

Yes, the full-back has his mead of thanks. 

And the quarter "did it all," 
And the halves are praised, and a voice is raised 

For the ends who took the ball; 
Now take your cup and fill it up 

To the brim with the dancing wine; 
A toast to those in the fighting rows 

To the men who hold the line! 

— W. F. Barton in T. S. A. A. News 



Our Thanks 

TO THE COUNTY AND 

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

AND 

THE COLLEGES 

AND 

INDIVIDUAL SCHOOLS 

WHICH HAVE CHOSEN US 

TO HANDLE 

THEIR STUDENT AND ATHLETIC 

ACCIDENT PROGRAMS FOR 1961-62 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 

*Z4« KUufden, GamfUiH4f, general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Msrr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

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Hiqh School Athlete 



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The Player . . . 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting-, he loses without excuses, and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 



The Coach . . . 



1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 



The Oiiicial . . . 



1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator . . . 




1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

CCTDBER-iaBI 




National Federation Annual Meeting 

The 42nd annual meeting- of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations was 
held at the French Lick-Sheraton Hotel, French Lick, 
Indiana, on July 2-5, 196L Forty-eight Associations 
including Alaska and Hawaii, in addition to the 
affiliate Association of Saskatchewan, Canada, were 
represented. Sixty-two State Executive Officers or 
Assistant Executive Officers, 63 State Association 
Board of Control officers and 70 additional Board 
members attended. Several National Associations, in- 
cluding the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, the 
American Medical Association, the American Dental 
Society, the United States Olympic Committee, the 
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Ameri- 
can Junior Bowling Congress, the American Associa- 
tion for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, 
the National Association of Secondary-School Princi- 
pals, the North Central Association of Colleges and 
Secondary-Schools, the Chicago Area Teachers' 
Science Association, the National Forensic League, 
the National University Extension Association, the 
Division for Girls and Women's Sports and the Iowa 
Girls' High School Athletic Union were also repre- 
sented. The total individual attendance was 475. 

The K. H. S. A. A. was represented by President 
Louis Litchfield; Directors Jack Dawson, Robert For- 
sythe, K. G. Gillaspie, Oran C. Teater, and Cecil A. 
Thornton; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield. Kentuckians also 
in attendance at the meeting were Charles Vettiner 
of Louisville, Paul W. Trimble of Paintsville and 
Russell Williamson of Inez. 

GENERAL SESSIONS were held on Sunday and 
Monday evenings. Combined sessions met on Monday 
and Wednesday mornings. On Monday afternoon, the 
Board of Control members and the Executive Officers 
met in separate sessions. Tuesday morning the Non- 
Athletic group met, as did those particularly interest- 
ed in Athletic Committee and Rules Reports. Wednes- 
day afternoon five workshop sessions, grouped on 
the basis of interest, met simultaneously. Tuesday 
evening was devoted to a banquet at which the 
Basketball Hall of Fame honored H. V. PORTER, A. 
A. SCHABINGER and ARTHUR L. TRESTER for 
their outstanding contributions to the game. During 
the banquet, award certificates were presented, hon- 
oring each of these men for his outstanding contribu- 
tion to the game of Basketball by the representatives 
of the Hall of Fame Honors Committee, WILLIAM 
FOX, JR., J. C. HARPER, and LYLE T. QUINN. Mr. 
Schabinger received his award personally, the award 
made for Mr. Trester was received by his wife and 
the award presented to Mr. Porter was accepted on 
his behalf by Clifford B. Fagan. The overflow crowd 
expressed its gratitude to the honored gentlemen for 
their many years of outstanding service to the game 



of basketball. Places of honor were also provided for 
recipients of National Federation citation certificates, 
which were presented on behalf of five most deserv- 
ing recipients, with Executive Committeeman JOHN 
J. F. RUDDY making the presentations and the listed 
Committee giving assistance. Three of the recipients 
were in places of honor during the banquet. These 
were LEON BRIGHAM (Washington), JAMES CAVE 
(California) and HERMAN F. KELLER (Indiana). 
Certificates were presented in absentia to PHILLIP 
J. HAMMES (New York) and NORMAN J. MANS- 
FIELD (New Jersey). During the banquet, ALBERT 
WILLIS (Illinois) presented a most appropriate and 
dignified memorial for PRIOR EVANS, ROBERT S. 
HINSHAW, JAMES JIACOLETTI, FRANK P. 
MAGUIRE, and HAROLD A. SWAFFIELD, each of 
whom passed away during the past year. 

The principal address at the opening General 
Session was given by Phil N. Eskew, a member of the 
Indiana H. S. A. A. Council. Mr. Eskew's topic, "The 
Good Old Days," was presented in a humorous vein, 
which attracted the undivided attention of each mem- 
ber of the audience. He related that every place he 
went people were mentioning or contending that it 
would be good for the country to get back to the 
"Good Old Days." He asked, "When were the good 
old days?" and indicated that, to some people, it was 
ten years ago and to others fifty. Still others con- 
sider the "good old days" two or three centuries ago. 
Humorously, he directed the group's attention to the 
fact that the good old days meant the old-fashioned 
fireplaces, the cookstoves and open wells, muddy 
and dusty roads, rather unreliable automobiles and 
medicines that were not palatable and, therefore, 
difficult to take. After describing many of the condi- 
tions in the "Good Old Days," and having fun about 
what people used to do, Mr. Eskew forcefully called 
attention to three attitudes people had in the good 
old days which seemingly are sorely needed today. He 
contended it is necessary that we in America have 
more faith in our country, that we develop more 
courage to do what is right, and that we gain more 
faith in God. The speaker held that life that survives, 
communities that progress, and organizations that go 
forward look upon the good old days with satisfac- 
tion, meet today with a thrill and anticipate tomorrow 
with fearless expectation. His challenging address was 
most enthusiastically accepted by those present at ahe 
opening session. 

Director K. G. Gillaspie of Kentucky, in the Mon- 
day morning Board of Control Session, gave a report 
on the K. H. S. A. A. Football Playoffs. The general. 
Board of Control and Executive Officers' sessions held 
duiing the three day meeting included the following 
topics: Administrators Have a Responsibility in 
Athletics, The Fellowship of Christian Athletes, 
Recommendations for Scheduling Games, A Sport for 
Every Boy, A Developmental Program for Olympic 
(Continued on Page Six) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV— NO. -.i 



OCTOBER, 1961 



.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify 
any rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

22. Play: During- a night football game, while 
a down is in progress, there is a complete power 
failure. Power is restored in a very short time (30 
seconds or so) and the lights then function properly 
immediately. Does the down count? Where is the ball 
next put in play? 

Ruling: If a temporary power failure occurs 
while a down is in progress, the down will be can- 
celed and replayed, except if: (a) a player is pos- 
session of the ball is completely clear and it is per- 
fectly evident he is about to score; or (b) the forward 
progress of a player in possession of the ball has 
been virtually stopped and the ball is about to be- 
come dead immediately. In (a), a touchdown is 
awai-ded. In (b), the ball is declared dead at the spot 
where the forward progress of the player has been 
stopped. 

23. Play: 3rd and 5 on B's 20. Al is offside. A2 
advances ball across B's goal line. After ball is dead, 
Bl commits personal foul. 

Ruling: Penalty for offside by Al is automatically 
accepted. Penalty is measured from B's 20, which 
places the ball on B's 25. Then the penalty for the 
foul by Bl is administered from B's 25 and it places 
the ball on B's 12% yardline. 

24. Play: Ball is snapped with 10 team B players 
on the field. Al forward passes and Bll, during the 
live ball, comes onto the field from the bench into 
defensive territory, intercepts the pass and advances 
for a touchdown. 

Ruling: Illegal substitution because Bll came 
on the field during a live ball (after the snap). 

Comment: By the authority provided the Official 
in Rule 7-3, this could be an unsportsmanlike act in 
certain unusual situations, but it would be exceptional 
to rule the above play as unsportsmanlike. 

25. Play: What signals should Officials use to 
designate the foul when a lineman pulls out of the 
line too soon ? 

Ruling: Signal No. 2. The use of signal No. 3 
is incorrect to designate this foul and the use of 
signal No. 3 serves to confuse both the players and 
spectators. 

26. Play: Following a fair catch on B's 20 
yardline, team A elects to free kick. During the 
attempt, which goes between the goal post above 
the crossbar, Al holds. 

Ruling: If team B accepts the penalty, it is en- 
forced from B's 20 yardline and will be put in play 
for the succeeding down on B's 35 yardline. Team A 
must again free kick, as provided in 5-2-4. 

27. Play: Do the rules permit identifying play- 
ers by the use of such designations as El, E2, Tl, T2 



etc.? 

Ruling: The rules require that players' jerseys 
be numbered rather than lettered. Rule 1-5-1 refers 
specifically to the jersey numbars on front and back 
and does not indicate the use of letters. 

28. Play: Team B coach suddenly realizes his 
team has only ten men on the field and he sends Tl 
onto the field just after the ball has been stopped by 
team A. 

Ruling: Illegal substitution. 5-yard penalty. This 
is a case of entry while the ball is alive and it is 
covered in the first sentence of Rule 3-7-1. Player SI 
did not legally enter the game and, therefore, violated 
the substitution provision. The substitution is as simple 
as any rule can be made. The only possible infi'actions 
are: entry and withdrawal (or vice versa) during the 
same dead ball period; or failure to have replaced 
player off field before ball becomes alive; or entry 
while ball is alive. Using a substitution or pretended 
substitution to deceive opponents is covered under 
Rule 7-2-4. Rule 9-4-1 does not apply in this situation. 
It is applicable only when a player goes out-of-bounds 
and then returns inbounds to participate, however, 
this does not include being blocked or pushed out-of- 
bounds. 

29. Play: 4th and 10 on K's 45. Punt strikes 
ground on R's 15 yardline, bounces and hits Rl on R's 
12. Kl and R2 appead to simultaneously recover ball 
on R's 10 yardline. 

Ruling: Competent officials will see the play as 
either Kl or R2 gaining possession of the ball first. 
It would be almost impossible for opponents to sim- 
ultaneously gain possession of ball in this situation. 

30. Play: K punts and, during the kick, time for 
the 4th quarter expires. Kl commits fair catch in- 
terference and Rl is prevented from catching the kick. 

Ruling: Game is over. 

31. Play: During try-for-point after touchdown, 
ineligible A3 and A4 advance beyond the neutral zone 
before ball leaves hand of forward passer Al. The 
pass is completed to A2. 

Ruling: No point is scored and there is no re- 
play. 

32. Play: What is the penalty against the home 
team if lime or any other caustic or toxic material is 
used to mark the football field? 

Ruling: It was not intended to include in the 
rules book a penalty for failure to mark a football 
field with acceptable material. This matter is in the 
same category as the color of the ball or a field 
which has been marked incorrectly. It is assumed the 
sponsoring organization will discipline or penalize 
any school which violates the rule. 

33. Play: 4th and 10 on K's 20. Punt by Kl is 

(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



OCTOBER. 1961 VOL. XXIV— NO. 3 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1968-62), Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Directors— Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63), Browder ; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-66), Danville; Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64), Paintsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

.mliom the Commissionei s Office 

The Cross Country Run 

The K.H.S.A.A. will attempt to set up eight 
regional cross country meets, scheduled to be held on 
Saturday, October 28, 1961. The sites are Paducah, 
Bowling Green, Clarkson, Bardstown, Louisville, Bell- 
evue, Lexington and Paintsville. Entry blanks will be 
sent to the principals of all member schools who have 
indicated that they plan to sponsor cross country 
teams this year. The state cross country run is 
scheduled to be held in Lexington on November 11. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Each registered official should file 
at once with his bureau head and/ or the nearest bui'eau 
head his schedule of games and a list of dates on which 
the official will be available to call games. The names 
of the bureau heads, with their residence and business 
phone numbers, are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State College, 
Murray, Res. No. PI 3-3579, Bus. PI 3-2310, Ext. 236 

Region 2. Charles Irwin, Route 4, Hopkinsville, 
Res. No. TU 6-4820, Bus. TU 6-4820 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1413 Mary's, Owensboro, 
Res. No. MU 3-2136, Bus. MU 3-3574 

Region 4. Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, Res. No. 
GR 6-2656, Bus. GR 6-2276 

Region 5. Turner Elrod, W.K.S.C, Bowling Green, 
Res. No. VI 2-5110, Bus. VI 3-43.34. 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, McCvdlum Ave., Eliza- 
bethtown, Res. No. RO 5-6273, Bus. Ft. Knox 4-7129 

Region 7. Claude Ricketts, 10217 Starlight Way, 
Valley Station, Res. No. WE 7-8610, Bus. ME 4-1551, 
Ext. 220 

Dave Longenecker, 3910 Olympic, Louisville 7, 
Res. No. TW 6-9071, Bus. TW 5-3401 

Region 8. Elmo Head, 113 Alton Road, Shelby- 
ville. Res. No. ME 3-4220, Bus. ME 3-1750 

Region 9. John Schaar, Bellevue High School, 
Bellevue, Res. No. CO 1-5069, Bus. CO 1-2980 

Region 10. Jack Wise, 408 Fountain Ave., George- 
town, Res. No. 2052, Bus. 2072 Sadieville 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 2210 Circle Drive, 
Lexington, Res. No. 4-9620, Bus. 4-2431 

Region 12. Briscoe Inman, Centre College, Dan- 
ville, Res. No. 3075, Bus. 1900, Ext. 26 

Region 13. Bill Nau, Clark St., Barbourville, Res. 
No. 6-4112, Bus. 6-3057 

Region 14. Paul Wright, 349 Broadway, Hazard, 
Res. No. GE 6-4277 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Riverview Drive, Pike- 
ville, Res. No. GE 7-6410, Bus. GE 7-6410 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, Y.M.C.A., Ashland, Res. 
No. 324-2665, Bus. 324-6191 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Aspy, David, Cardwell Way, Louisville, AN 7-1827, TW 5-0567 

Autore, Daniel, Box 172, Wheelwright, 2362 

Barlow, Bill B.. 3050 Lynnwood Dr., Paris 63-J, Lexington 

2-2220 Ext. 2263 
Blacketor, Dr. Paul E., Union College, Barbourville 
Book, Donald, 118 Elam Park, Lexington, 7-1265, 5-3880 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 West 12th St., Bowling Green, VI 

3-3319 
Boyle, Dennie M., 5470-A Kelly St.. Fort Knox, 4-4008 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 2-0954, 2-3212 & 

2-0232 
Bunch, William D., 1153 N. 14th St., Paducah, 3-2916 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 N. Timberlane Drive, Maderia, Ohio, LO 

1-8745, JE 1-2281 
Chinn, Ralph, 3205 Hampton St., Ashland, 324-0683 
Clark, Owen B., 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 2047, Lexington 

2-8717 
Clarke, Lt. Edward F., 5485-F Jamison St., Van Voorhis-Fort 

Knox 
Clusky, Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 

Conn. Kenneth, Washington Ave., Berea, 986-3906, 986-4781 
CuIIen, Charles E., 3301 Utah Ave., Louisville, EM 6-0434, 

JU 2-8285 
Davis, Curtis, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4969 
Davis, David Allen, 5629 Stewart, Portsmouth, Ohio, PR 

6-7206 
Dotson, W. S., 432 E. 6th St., Lexington, 2-6131, 4-0350 
Duke, J. W., 606 Wataga. Louisville, 893-2956, BU 2-6681 
Evans, William E., 93 High St., Ceredo, W. Va. 
Ellis, Harry, USAARMC, Special Service, Fort Knox 4-7400, 

4-1255 
Fallon. Robert, 101 Cleveland Ave., Hazard, 6-2161, 6-4628 
Haffey, Stan, 1243 Garden Circle, Cincinnati 15, Ohio, MU 

1-2420 (Bus.) 
Hall, John R., 919 Highland Ave., Ashland, 324-2016, 324-1111 
Horton, Aldrich, 821 Clark St.. Paducah, 443-5938 
Howerton, Jack, Jr., Route I. Box 436, Anchorage, CH 5-8456, 

JU 5-5031 
Jarboe, Clem. 321 Concord Blvd., Evansville, Indiana, HA 

4-1961, HA 5-1391 
Johnson, Bernard M., 322 Blueberry Lane, Lexington, 7-2883, 

2-2200 ext. 2324 
Johnson, Stanley W., Jr., 2156 Ottawa, Owensboro, 684-2167, 

General Electric Ex. 236 
Kimball, Philip Clyde. 5513 Westhall, Louisville. EM 8-2030, 

EM 3-2628 
Lange, William E.. Jr.. 1420 Arcade. Louisville, EM 8-9712 
Lawson, Carl E., Ivy Hill, Harlan, 1327, 136 
Lee, Charles J.. 316 Scott St., Lexington. 2-3003, 3-4721 
McCollum, Robert G.. 406 Holiday Road, Lexington, 3-6513, 

2-2220 ext. 4251 
McConachie, Byron E., 5608 Halstead. Louisville, WO 9-9676 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 251, Corbin, 2361 
McQuilling, Gerald, 2011 S. Lombard, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6941, HA 5-3311 
Madon, Robert Lee. Virginia Ave., Pineville, ED 7-2436 
Marks, Edward W., Sports Branch. Special Services, Ft., 

Knox, 4-5633, 4-1255 
Masters, Lester, Big Stone Gap, Va. 
Maxwell, Ray, 310 Stocking Ave., Sistersville, W. Va. 
Miller, Kenneth H., Sgt., 4469-B Gaffey Hts., Fort Knox 
Mudd. Ed., 3512 Mildred Dr., Louisville, SP 6-6888 
Myers, James R., 5353 Charloe St., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Parker, Billy E., P. O. Box 731, Pineville. 7-3293 
Pettit, Milton H., USATCA-Special Services, Fort Knox, 4-1252, 

4-2955 
Phelps. Don "Dopey", 142 Alta Ave., Danville. 236-2852 
Pinson. Eugene, 3208 Hackworth St., Ashland, 324-6548, 324- 

3101 
Powell, Logan, 817 Delia St., Lexington, 5-1663, 2-3266 
Raitt, William C, 2631 Bremont Ave., (Cincinnati, Ohio. RE 

1-6378, CH 1-6700 
Rentz, Thomas W., 161 Chenault Road, Lexington, 6-8242. 

3-2880 
Roettger, W. H., 2856 Hikes Lane, Louisville 18, GL 1-9177, 

Ft. Knox 4-1122 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 5600 Jeanine Dr., Louisville, 969-3013, ME 

5-7441 
Sallee, Alan L., 1737 Deer Park Ave., Louisville, GL 1-6478 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 VanDorn St.. Corbin, 2187, 2187 
Schlich. Paul E.. 3315 Dean Dr., Louisville, GL 8-6766, TW 

6-0211 
Schmitt, Paul E., 602 South 40th St., Louisville, SP 8-5365 
Schutz, John J., Jr., 3221 Hickory Grove, New Albany, Indiana, 

WH 4-9457, HE 7-S726 
Selvy, Curt, 108 17th St., Corbin, 2422, 2270-W 
Sheets, William, Route 6, Parkersburg, W. Va., HU 5-6871, 

HU 5-6761 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Page Three 



Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville, Tenn., 

MI 7-4112, Ft. Campbell ext. 3320 
Shumate, Roy V., 201 Island, Harlan, 189 
Simms, Wavelan J., Jr., 177 Howell St., Providence, Rhode 

Island EL 1-6711 (Bus.) 
Skinner, Earnest, 206 Pine, Murray, PL 3-3893 
Smith, Thomas E., 11 Polster Dr., Evansville, Indiana, GR 

7-3302, HA 2-9174 
Staples, Jerry, 1125 Loeb St., Henderson 
Staten, Joseph B., 128 Mills Dr., Louisville, 447-4924 
Stevens, Alex. 616 Highfield, Danville, 236-4730, 236-5211 
Stone, Clifton, 2930 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Indiana, GR 

6-3918, HA 5-3311 
Strain, Richard P., USAARMC, Special Services, Ft. Knox 
Straight. Roy, West Junior High School, Huntington, W. Va. 
Tharpe, Robert, 212 Spruce, PL 3-4671 
Thomas, Raymond E., Sturgis, 2151, VA 7-9891 
Tucker, William R., 27 Lisle Lane, Winchester 
Van Meter, David G., 3148 Talisman Road, Louisville 20, GL 

4-4030 
Washer, Robert Stanley, 1625 Catalpa St., Louisville 11, SP 

8-7622 
Warren. Kenneth A., 45 Meadowview Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6001, 

ME 4-1551 ext. 258 
Weisbrodt, Paul E., 837 Sherwood, Lexington. 7-3924, 7-3457 
Wise, Billy V., 2112 St. Teresa Dr., Lexington, 6-7449, 2-5494 & 

2-0410 
Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb, Henderson, VA 6-4526 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met in the K.H.S.A.A. 
building, Lexington, on Saturday afternoon, Sept- 
ember 30, 1961. The meeting was called to order by 
President W. H. Crowdus, at 1:30, with Board mem- 
bers K. G. Gillaspie, Jack Dawson, Preston Holland, 
Don R. Rawlings, Oran C. Teater, and Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the reading of the minutes of the July 22nd 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported on a questionnaire 
which had been sent out recently to K.H.S.A.A. 
principals concerning the possible elimination of the 
consolation game in the State Basketball Tournament. 
He reported that most of the questionnaires had 
been returned, and that the ratio of voting against 
the consolation game was approximately 3-2. K. G. 
Gillaspie moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, that 
the consolation game be eliminated from the State 
Basketball Tournament. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

The Commissioner also reoorted that the ques- 
tionnaire indicated an interest in rifle marksman- 
ship, girls' swimming, and girls' golf, on the part 
of some fifteen or twenty principals in each category. 
He stated that it was his belief that this number 
would increase if the Association made an effort to 
sponsor tournaments in these spoHs. Don R. Rawlings 
moved, seconded by Preston Holland, that the Comm- 
issioner and the Assistant Commissioner make every 
effort to set up regional and state eliminations in 
rifle marksmanship, girls' swimming, and girls' golf. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Chairman K. G. Gillaspie of the Policy Com- 
mittee made several suggestions to the Board con- 
cerning desirable policies in the filing of expense 
accounts, issuance of State Tournament passes, sup- 
plementary audits, and publicity for the football play- 
offs. After a general discussion of the Committee 
recommendations, Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded 
by Preston Holland, that the report of the Policy 
Committee be accepted, and that the recommended 
policy be adopted. The motion v.is carried unanimously. 
The Commissioner read a letter from Secretary- 



Treasurer Joe Ohr of the Kentucky Coaches Associa- 
tion requesting that the Board give its sanction to 
the Association All-Star games for 1962 and 1963. 
Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Preston Holland, 
that the request of Mr. Ohr on behalf of the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association be granted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner also read a letter from Joseph 
N. HuUett, All-Star game director of the Kentucky- 
Indiana basketball games, requesting that the Board 
consider approving a joint sponsorship of the Ken- 
tucky-Indiana games between the Kenutcky Coaches 
Association and the Lions Club Eye Foundation. The 
Board took no action on this ''cquest, except to re- 
affirm the original position taken in its meeting 
April 22, 1961, establishing a policy of not sanction- 
ing any future all-star or post-season games, with 
the possible exception of the K.H.S.C.A. game. 

Upon recommendation of the Commissioner, 
Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that the eligibility of a Middlesboro pupil, Philip 
Hafer, be restored under authority given the Board in 
Article IV, Section 3-d-7 of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitu- 
tion. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner brought to the attention of 
the Board a request which he had received from 
school officials of the East Main Street (Lynch) 
High School for a forfeit of the East Main Street- 
Hall football game to Lynch. The game was scheduled 
to have been played on September 22, 1961, and was 
not played because of non-agreement on officials. 
The Commissioner stated that the home school. Hall 
High School, had not complied with the provisions of 
K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 23, relative to securing agreement 
on officials at least ten days before the contest; and 
that the State Office and several of the regional 
offices, with only a day or two to work on the pro- 
blem, had been unable to secure officials for the game. 
The Commissioner further stated that Supt. Sam 
Potter of Lynch, who had asked that the forfeit be 
declared, had stated to him that the East Main Street 
High School would not expect the payment of the 
two hundred dollar forfeit mentioned in the contract. 
The Commissioner stated that, in his opinion, there 
was some merit to the various arguments presented 
by the parties to the altercation, that he had the 
opportunity of going into the case in detail with the 
school officials involved during a recent trip to Harlan 
County, but that it was his considered opinion that, 
in interpreting K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 24, Section 2, he 
had no alternative but that to declare the game in 
question forfeited to the East Main Street High 
School. All members of the Board, with the exception 
of Cecil A. Thornton who did not express his senti- 
ments concerning the case, concurred in the interpre- 
tation of the By-Law involved. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater, that the 'Trophy Committee that was scheduled 
to meet immediately following the Board meeting, 
be given the authority to make the selection of trophies 
for the various 1961-62 tournaments and meets. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

December 23, 1961, was set for the next meet- 
ing of the Board of Control, scheduled to be held in 
Lexington. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Don R. Rawl- 
ings, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning July 20, 1961, and ending September 29, 
1961, be allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

A vei-y wise man once told me, "The best gift that 
we can give our children is memories — good memories." 
The truth of this statement becomes increasingly evi- 
dent as The Dutchman travels rhe 1961 Basketball 
Clinic Trail. 

This year's 1800 mile trip is a sentimental journey 
for a number of reasons chief among which are: 

(1) This marks my twentieth consecutive journey 
teaching rules and interpretations. 

(2) A fifth of a century is bound to embody mem- 
ories — good memories. So let's lelive some of those 
years and go back even farther in a trip down 
"Memory Lane"! 

The year is 1929. A green, college kid from Western 
is hired for three bucks to referee a basketball game 
in which College High plays a team from Hadley 
coached by a youngster everybody liked and respect- 
ed as a "Diamond In The Rough" — H. L. Perkins. 

In September of 1961, Hardin County stood at at- 
tention at a testimonial dinner honoring this gentle- 
man who left Hadley to write basketball history as 
coach of Rinejrville's great state tournament teams. 

Thirty-two years after that College High-Hadley 
game H. L. Perkins received the Flying Dutchman's 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award at this dinner for a 
life time of service to young people. The Dutchman 
could not attend "Perk's" honor dinner but his 
thoughts wandered down Memory Lane from far away 
in Indianapolis to be with his friend who encouraged 
(him to keep calling them the way he saw them and 
who gave him continuing support and encouragement 
through the years. They should have made more like 
Principal and Coach H. L. Perkins before they threw 
the stamp away. 

It was a year later that Bowling Green's immortal 
Doug Smitty crossed our athletic scene. Highly-re- 
spected and adored by all who knew him, Doug dedi- 
cated his life to Christian service until his fatal acci- 
dent which occurred while returning home after 
watching a football game at the University of Ken- 
tucky. You can't walk across Ogden College Campus 
in Bowling Green without remembering Doug. 

Memories, good memories, are always with the 
Dutchman as he recalls little courtesies and kind- 
nesses extended by so many over the past twenty 
years. A few of these men high on the list of "Nature 
Noblemen" include Rineyville's H. L. Perkins, "Ty" 
Holland of Murray; Roy Eversole, Hazard; Ernie 
Chattin, Ashland; Bill Hunt, Mayfield; Barcus Gray, 
Woodburn; Raymond Ridley, Glasgow; Ted Sanford, 
Carrollton; Oakley Brown, Hopkinsville ; Dick Van- 
Hoose, Anchorage; Bob Laughlin, Morehead; Earle 
Jones, Maysville; Herb Ward, Scottsville; Bill 
Shattles, Glasgow; Leo Ashby, Rich Pond; Otis Din- 
ning, Paducah; Sam Pollock, Madisonville; Buford 
Clark and Herb Tye, Barbourville, and the "Sage of 
Kentucky's Mountains," the indefatigable Russell 
Williamson of Inez. 




LITTLE JIM 

Are you old enough to take a sentimental journey 
far back to the depression years ? Do you remember 
those crack teams that Russ Williamson used to bring 
to Alumni Gym in Lexington to fight for the "Big 
Championship" — But more important, do you remem- 
ber Little Jim, the Inez Indian Mascot who was the 
talk of the country ? Remember the little two-year old 
Jimmie Williamson who won friends by the thousands 
with his dribbling performances at the State Tourna- 
ments ? 

Many have asked, "What became of Little Jim?" 
The answer is that he is Big Jim now. Twenty-eight 
years of age, he is now the Dr. Jim Williamson who 
last spring was honored with a plaque for being the 
most outstanding resident physician at the Univer- 
sity of Louisville. 

Russ, who has seen many snows fall on his beloved 
mountains since Little Jim became a mascot, then an 
Inez regular in 1947-1950 and valedictorian of his 
class in 1950, has this to say of Dr. Jim Williamson: 
"If you do not have a boy like Dr. Jim, don't worry 
too much because there are just not enough of them to 
go around." Remember Lavonne Heath of Hazard? 
She married "Little Jim" and they have two daughters. 

Time flies backward on this sentimental journey 
dmvn Memory Lane. It's good to look back and re- 
live memories and it's time to be thankful that the 
"Man Upstairs" made them all possible. 

But "Time Mai'ches On" and we are back in the 
Year of 1961 riding the old fnmihar clinic trail. It 
looks much the same as it did tv/enty years ago but 
every now and then the Dutchman sees the footprints 
left in Kentucky's "Sands of Time" by some of the 
fellows and he also sees new footprints being made. 

The Jefferson County Board of Education made a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Page Five 





BIG JIM 

lasting "foot print" by the promotion of a County-Wide 
Sportsmanship Committee. So that organization re- 
ceived the Abou Ben Adhsm av/ard for September. 
Superintendent Richard VanHoose and K. H. S. A. A. 
Board of Control member, Jacli Dawson, get the 
Dutchman's salute. 

Wood Gardner, Principal of Park City High School, 
will add another footprint to our "Sands of Time" in 
November with this year's first nomination for Game 
Guy of 1961-62. Watch for next month's story of 
David Wood. 

The Dutchman's closing thought is a lesson: The 
people who try to get along On Pull turn out to be 
jerks. 



K.A.H.P.E.R. Conference 

The fall conference is announced for the Kentucky 
Association for Health, Physical Education and Re- 
creation, and for the Kentucky Ittnreation and Parks 
Society. The chief speaker and consultant for the con- 
ference will be Dr. Jay Bender of Southern Illinois 
University. Dr. Bender is a professor of physical 
education. 

The main theme of the confe]'ence will be "Where 
Are We In Kentucky And Where Are We Going In 
HPER." The conference is to be held October 27, 28, 
and 29 at the Kentucky Dam Village, beginning with a 
special barbecue dinner on Friday night. During the 
conference, divisional meetings will be held for those 
interested in health, men's athletics, physical educa- 
tion, and recreation. Reports wil! be heard from the 
Southern Districts and the National HPER. 

Time has been alloted for special interest group 
meeting such as student sections, college staffs, or 
announced special interest groups. 

All persons interested in any phase of health, 
physical education, and recreation are cordially in- 
vited to attend this fall conference. For further in- 
formation, please write Mrs. Howard Harkins, Presi- 
dent of the KAHPER, 207 Walnut Street, Greenville, 
Kentucky. 



K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 

(Names of head football coaches are listed. As- 
terisks indicate that the school maintains 8-man foot- 
ball.) 

Anderson (Lawi'enceburg), Henry Frazier; Ash- 
land, Rex J. Miller, Atherton (Louisville), Jack Kleier; 
Attucks (Hopkinsville), James W. Armstrong; Austin- 
Tracy* (Lucas), Carroll Holmes; 

Barbourville, Ray Blair Canady; Bardstown, Garnis 
Martin; Bate (Danville), Emmett W. Broadus, Sr.; 
Beechwood (So. Ft. Mitchell), Gene Terry; Belfry, 
Albert Vipperman; Bell County (Pineville), Cleo 
Pursifull; Bellevue, Jim Jenkins; Berea,* Howard 
Foley; Bishop David Memorial (Louisville), Wally 
English; Boone County (Florence), John Dorman; 
Bourbon County (Paris), Eugene Correll; Bowling 
Green, Jim Pickens; Bryan St^ition (Lexington), 
Robert Cocanougher; Buckhorn, Harry Burton; 
Burgin,* Robert J. Elder; Butler (Louisville), Milan 
Perpich; 

Caldwell County (Princeton), Fred R. Clayton; 
Campbell County (Alexandria), Claude Wilson; Camp- 
bellsville, Lawrence Gilbert; Camp Dick Robinson* 
(Lancaster), Earl Shaw; Carlisle, William Ed. Leedy; 
Carrollton, John Buckner; Catholic Country Day 
(Louisville), Bill Kleier; Catlettsbiirg, Eugene Foster; 
Cavema* (Horse Cave), James Robinson; Central 
(Louisville), James D. White; Clark County (Winches- 
ter), Charles Adams; Christian County (Hopkinsville), 
Charles Russell; Corbin, Carl Oakley; Crittenden 
County (Marion), Bill Huff; Cumberland, Needham 
Saylor; Cynthiana, Guy Patterson; 

Danville, Ray Callahan; Daviess County (Owens- 
boro), George Claiborne; Dayton, Tom Daley; DeSales 
(Louisville), Gilbert Sturtzel; Dilce Combs Memorial 
(Jeff), Frank Asbury; DLxie Heights (So. Ft. 
Mitchell), Dale Waite; Douglass (Henderson), George 
K. McGill; Douglass (Murray), John Prewitt; DuBois 
(Mt. Sterling), Arthur R. Hawkins; duPont Manual 
(Louisville), Tom Harper; DuiTctt (Louisville), Rex 
Slechter; 

Eastern (Middletown), Charles Hord; East Main 
Street (Lynch), Edward Miracle; Elizabethtown, Bill 
Hogg; Elkhorn City, Gobel Salyers; Eminence*, 
Charles Quertermous; Evarts, Charles Hunter; 

Fairdale, Robert E. Simpson; Fem Creek, Earl 
Browning; Flaget (Louisville), Paul Miller; Fleming- 
Neon (Fleming), Jack R. Hall: Fort Knox, John 
Hackett; Frankfort, 0. C. Leathers; Franklin County 
(Frankfort), Bob Bennett; Franklin-Simpson (Frank- 
lin), Robert E. Brown; Fultcn, Chester Caddas; 
Georgetown, Duke Owens; Glasgow, Jimmy Poynter; 
Gamaliel,* Jerry Smalling. 

Hall Robert C. Goforth; Harlan, Tom Ward; Harri- 
son County (Cynthiana), Billy McKee; Harrodsburg, 
Charles Kolasa; Hazard, Paul Wright; Hazel Green, 
(East Bernstadt), Hughes Bennett; Henderson, Wil- 
liam Dawson; Henderson County (Henderson), Mojo 
Hollowell; Henry Clay (Lexington), Andy Hopkins; 
Highlands (Fort Thomas), Hom.er Rice; High Street 
(Bowling Green), J. S. Owmby; Hiseville*, Robert 
Thum; Holmes (Covington), Tom Ellis; Hopkinsville, 
James W Bravard; 

Irvine, Woodrow Creech; 

Jenkins, John Morgan; Jessamine County (Nich- 
olasville), Elmer Stephenson; 

Kentucky Military Institute (Lyndon), J. E. Pace; 
Knox Central (Barbourville), Charles Black; 

Lafayette (Lexington), Roy Walton; Lancaster, 
Waddell Murphy; LaRue County (Hodgenville), 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Clarence Caple; Lebanon, Sam Sears; Leslie County 
(Hyden), Bascom Fawbush; Lily, Joe Lankford; Lin- 
coln (Franklin), William Griffitli; Lincoln (Paducah), 
John C. McVoy; Lincoln Institute (Lincoln Ridge), 
Alvin C. Hanley; Lloyd (Erlanger), Jerry Abney; Lon- 
don, David Fryrear; Louisa Wallace Ishain; Louis- 
ville Country Day, Olen W. Fishback; Loyall, Charles 
Davis, Ludlow, Dan L. Sullivan; Lynn Camp (Corbin), 
James Messer; 

McKell (South Shore), Chester Bruce; 

Madison (Richmond), Roy Kidd; Madisonville, Bill 
Welborn; Male (Louisville), Charles W. Kuhn; May- 
field, Virgil Rains; M. C. Napier (Hazard), John 
Neverstitch; Mercer County (Harrodsburg), Amos 
Black; Metcalfe County (Edmonton), Howard B. Keel; 
Middlesborough, Dave Hurst; Millersburg Military 
Institute, Lt. Col. G. W. Betts; Morgan County (West 
Liberty), Hearl Lockhart; Morganfield, Bob Martin; 
Mt. Sterling, Phil Owen; Mt. Vernon*, Lawrence 
Travis; Murray, Preston Holland; 

Newport, P. L. Hamlett, Jr.; Newport Catholic, 
Charles Frederick; 

Oldham County (LaGrange), William Mitchell; Old 
Kentucky Home (Bardstown), Milton Graham; Owens- 
boro, Ralph Genito; Owensboro Catholic, L. E. Van- 
Meter; 

Paducah Tilghman, Ralph McRight; Paint Lick*, 
Homer L. Profitt; Paintsville, Walter J. Brugh; Paris, 
Ben Pumphrey; Park City*, Larry Nutter; Perryville*, 
Jim Farley; Pikeville, Eugene David; Pineville, Wil- 
liam Adams; P. L. Dimbar (Lexington), Norman L. 
Passmore; Pleasure Ridge Park, James Gatewood; 
Prestonsburg, Hade Durbin, Jr.; Providence, Joseph 
Austin Jake; 

Raceland, James Conley; Rosenwald (Harlan), T. 
J. Walker; Russell, Brown Feix; Russellville, Way- 
mond Morris; 

St. Joseph (Bardstown), Dick Blocker; St. Xavier 
(Louisville), John Meihaus; Seneca (Louisville), Hal 
Taylor; Shawnee (Louisville), George Sauer; Shelby 
County (Shelbyville), Vincent Hancock; Shelbyville, 
Richard Greenwell; ShepherdsviUe, Dan Moore; Somer- 
set, Jim Williams; Southern (Louisville), George 
Bertram; Springfield, Roland Kimberlin; Stanford, 
Glenn Polly; Sturgis, Ralph Horning; 

Temple Hill* (Glasgow), Bob Pardue; Tompkins- 
ville, Clifton Carter; Trigg County (Cadiz), Raymond 
Heffington; Trinity (Louisville), Charles Quire; 

Valley (Valley Station), Dallas Arnold; Versailles, 
John Snowden; 

Waggener (Louisville), Martin Deim; Wallins 
(Wallins Creek), James L. Howard; Warren County 
(Bowling Green), Estill Branham; Western (Owens- 
boro), Joe Kendall; Western (Paris), William B. 
Reed; West Main (Lynch), Eugenie Traylor; Wheel- 
wright, Ray Brackett, Whitesburg, Gardner Bates; 
Williamsburg, Archie Powers; Wurtland, James 
Fletcher. 

NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Competition, School Board Representation on Boards 
of Control, Eliminating the Violations, Contracts for 
Games & Officials, State Association Insurance Pro- 
grams, State Association Owned Cars, Coaching 
Camps & Clinics for Students, A Look at Junior 
Bowling, The Babe Ruth League, 1960 Official 
Olympic Film, A State Superintendent Looks at In- 
terscholastic Athletics, Some Reflections on Sports as 



an Element of the Culture, All-Star Contests & Con- 
tinuing Eligibility, N. C. A. A. All-Star Resolution, 
Committee Reports, Athletics and Life, Association 
Finances-Sources and Uses, Junior High School Inter- 
scholastic Athletic Programs, State Association Spon- 
sored Clinics, and Tournament Series Administration. 
W. M. Runyon, Director, Official Sports Film Service, 
was in charge of a preview showing of the new film, 
OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, during the Opening Gen- 
eral Session. 

Approved and Certified Football Officials 

Certified Officals — Howard Bennett, George W. 
Brown, E. C. Caiman, Jr., Jack H. Durkin, Carl 
Elovitz, Robert H. Florence, Robert L. Fortney, W. 
H. Gammon, James Graham, Newell Hadden, Bart 
Hagei-man, Frank Heinze, John G. Heinze, Fletcher 
Holeman, Bernard Johnson, Carl Lawson, Bob Mc- 
CoUum, Edgar McNabb, E. B. May, Jr., Wm. M. 
Mayhew, William A. Mordica, Bill Nau, Doug Noland, 
William T. Riggs, K. F. Schmitt. John H. Shaw, Harry 
Stephenson, Clifton Stone, Don C. Sullivan. 

Approved Officials — Clarence T. Bell, Jack 
C. Bond, Homer Blanton, Jerry E. Boyles, John Burton, 
John Canter, Ellis Ray Current, Clyde E. Davis, 
Curtis Davis, J. W. Forbes, Jr., Paul Greene, Robert 
Han-od, George D. Hellard, William Holbrook, Clem 
Jarboe, Kenneth Kerr, H. L. Mayo, Jr., B. E. Mullins, 
Gresham Sacra, Stanley E. Shaw, Dewey Sizemore, 
Frank M. Thomas, W. S. Van Gilder, David G. Van- 
Meter, John P. Wilson, Paul Wood. 

LIST OF CORRECTIONS 

1961 Football Rules Publications 

CASE BOOK: 

1. Page 5, No. 4: In (c), K2 interfered and Rl 
advanced after the dead ball so it is a double foul. 
The do\vn shall be replayed. 

2. Page 57, No. 27 lA: It should not be assumed 
that all interference restrictions end when the ball 
leaves the passer's hand. All restrictions, except that 
ineligibles may go downfield when the ball leaves the 
Passer's hand, remain in effect until the pass is 
touched. 

FOOTBALL MEETING FOLDER: 

1. Page 1, Question 3, item (d): Correct answer 
is "no" because the foul by R2 was during the kick 
(loose ball play) and, therefore, the penalty is from 
the previous spot. 
FOOTBALL PLAYER HANDBOOK: 

1. Page 7, Question 9: Ball is forced into end 

zone. 

FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

first touched by K2 on his 40 and it bounds behind K's 

line where K3 recovers and attempts to advance but 

is downed. 

Ruling: R will undoubtedly take the play which 
would give them the ball because K failed to make a 
1st down. However, if R chooses, it could have the 
ball at the spot of first touching. 

34. Play: Interior linemen of team A come up 
to the line of scrimmage and take four-point stances, 
then simultaneously kick back with both feet and 
lift one hand, taking three-point stances. Is this a 
false start? 

Ruling: Yes. 

35. Play: Kl free kicks from his 40 yardline 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Page Seven 



and ball strikes on R's 20 yardline, after which it is 
simultaneously touched by K2 and Rl and goes out- 
of-bounds on R's 12 yardline. 

Ruling:: Ball put in play on R on its 40 yardline. 
The rule provides that ball is put in play at the in- 
bound spot when R is the last to touch the kick before 
it goes out-of-bounds. R is not the last to touch when 
K and R touch the ball simultaneously. 

36. Play: Bl is offside. Al advances for a 
touchdown. After Al crosses the goal line, A3 strikes 
B4. 

Ruling: Penalty for the offside by Bl is auto- 
matically declined. Touchdown counts. Penalty for 
foul by A3 is measured at succeeding spot (kickoff). 
If team A Captain tells Referee he wants to accept 
the penalty for offside by Bl, the situation will re- 
sult in a double foul. 

37. Play: During advance by Al for touchdown, 
A2 holds B2 in B's end zone. After Al crosses the 
goal line, B3 strikes A3. 

Ruling: Penalty for foul by A2 is automatically 
accepted and is meaesured from the goal line. Then 
the penalty for the foul by B3 is administered. It is 
measured from the 15 yardline, half the distance to 
the goal or to the 7^2 yardline. If penalty for the foul 
by A2 is declined by Captain of B, the situation is a 
double foul and the down will be replayed. 

38. Play: 4th and 10. Team A is m punt forma- 
tion and the snap is from the 5 yardline of A. Bl is 
offside. Snap is high and Al steps out of end zone to 
catch ball and then steps back in and punts. 

Ruling: If A accepts the offside penalty, the 
down is replayed. Should A decline the penalty, a safe- 
ty by A would result. 

39. Play: 4th and 10 on K's 10 yardline. Scrim- 
mage-kick by K is first touched by K on his 25 yard- 
line, after which it is touched by R while still beyond 
the line. The kick then rebounds behind the line and 
is recovered by K who is downed on his 5 yardline. 

Ruling: R was not first to touch kick beyond the 
line, so it is not automatically 1st down for K (the 
team in possession at the end of the down). Since it 
was 4th down when kick was made and K was in 
possession behind the line-to-gain at the end of the 
down, R can take ball at this spot and have 1st down 
on K's 5 yardline. 

40. Play: Free-kick by K from his 40 is touched 
by Rl on R's 35, then by Kl on R's 30 and the kick 
then goes out-of-bounds on R's 25. 

Ruhng: R's ball on his 40 yardline. 1st and 10. 

41. Play: Free-kick by K from his 20 is touch- 
ed by Kl on his 35 after it has touched the ground 
and then by Rl on the 50, after which it goes out-of- 
bounds on R's 30. 

Ruling: R's ball on his 30 yardline, 1st and 10. 

42. Play: Eligible receiver Al, downfield to 
catch pass, stumbles and falls on his back. While in 
this situation, he catches pass thrown by A2. 

Ruling: Legal completion, however, ball becom- 
es dead simultaneously with catch. 

43. Play: Team A throws pass from B's 30 into 
B's end zone where it is intercepted by Bl, who re- 
turn kicks ball. Ball goes straight up and comes 
down in B's end zone, where it is fallen upon by: (a) 
B2; or (b) Al. 

Ruling: Touchback in (a) and touchdown in (b). 

44. Play: Al throws forward pass which strik- 
es Official in flight, caroms into air and then is 
caught by: (a) eligible A2; or (b) Bl. 



Ruling: Legal in both cases and ball may be 
advanced. 

45. Play: A on B's 30, 4th and 8. Legal forward 
pass is thrown to B's 10 yardline, where B2 touches 
ball and it bounds high into the air. Legal receiver 
A3 pushes B2 to get at ball. A3 then catches the ball 
and crosses B's goal line. 

Ruling: This is not forward pass interfei'ence 
because B has touched ball. However, it is illegal use 
of hands by Offense (A3). Penalty automatically is 
accepted and it will be 4th and 23 for A on B's 45. 

Registered Basketball Officials 
oftheK.H.S.A.A.— 1961 

(List CompileJ Octobei- 1) 

If one telephone number i.s given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Abell. James A., 506 Oaklawn Dr., Padueah, 442-3916 
Abernathy, George R., 324 North Elm St., Henderson, VA 

7-1322, JE 3-6421 
Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Road, Louisville 7, TW .5-6367, 

TW 5-0667 
Adams, William M„ Letcher, 7787 
Adkins, Raymond C. 622 Amanda Furnace Drive, Ashland, 

324-7229 
Adkins, Wendell L., Box 57, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3544, MO 

4-3444 
Akins, Charlie, Route 2, Cecilia. TO 2-1911, RO 5-5453 
Akridce, Dean, Fredonia, 4801, 4432 
Albright, Gerald F„ Irvington, 547-3011, 547-2051 
Alexander, Donald, Box 583, Warsaw, JO 7-6071, JO 7-4081 
Alexander, Rex, 1320 Well's Blvd., Murray, PL 3-3579, PL 

3-2310 ext. 186 
Alford, William C, Poplar Ridge Road. Alexandria, MY 7-2462, 

MY 7-8221 
Allen, Lowry R.. Route 1, Bowling Green, 3-9346, 2-1632 
Allen, Nelson Robert, 317 Riverside Dr., Russell, 836-3687, 

324-1456 
Alley, Joe, Route 2, Prichard, W. Va. 
Almon. James H., 187 1st St., Lynch, 848-5942 
Almond, Alvin, College High, Bowling Green 
Alwes, Donald R„ Sr., Valley Station, WE 7-8481, WE 7-2300 
Anders, Raleigh A„ Virginia Ave.. Pineville, ED 7-2754 
Arnold, Kenneth, 9606 Seatonville Rd.. Fern Creek, CE 9-5445, 

CE 9-3267 
Bagby, Rod W.. 1703 Brentmoor, Anchorage, 245-0083 
Baird. Bill, Box 493, Harlan, 678, 53 
Baker, Joe R., Box 1905 APSC, Clarksville, Tenn., Gracey, Ky. 

A05-5095 
Baker. Robert M., Jr., 411 Jean, Danville, 236-2092, 236-3591 
Ball, Delbert, Burgin, 748-5395, 748-5221 
Ballaban, Thomas. 1103 Archland Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 

2-3024, PO 1-7600 
Ballard, Jack H„ 128 Pine St., Barbourville. LI 6-4482, LI 6-4131 
Ballinger, Richard L.. 333 E. St. Catherine St., Louisville 3, 

JU 4-2756 (Bus.) 
Bankemper. Thomas, 317 East 7th St., Newport, JU 1-5047 
Barker, Walter D„ Route 5, Portsmouth, Ohio, UL 8-2770, EL 

3-1840 
Barlow, Bill B., 3050 Lynnwood Dr., Paris, 63 J, Lexington 

2-2220 ext. 2263 
Barlow, Bill R., 347 Linden Walk, Lexington, 2-3277 
Bari-y. Harold L., 1618 East Cumberland Ave.. Middlesboro, 

2731 
Barton, Walter, Route 2, Box 303, Corbin, 1922, 9144 
Bates, Gardner, Jr., Whitesburg, 2405 
Baughn, E. L. "Tuggle", 1403 Johnson Blvd., Murray, PL 

3-5799, 395-4186 
Beaslev, Bobby, Hazel Green 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 South 41st St., Louisville 11, SP 8-7792, 

JU 4-1361 ext. 7124 
Bell. Jimmy D., 805 Sunnylane, Murray, PL 3-2206, PL 3-9031 
Benedict, Johnny, Box 263, Virgie, 639-4400 
Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Drive, Covington, JU 1-2121, HE 

16157 
Bennett, Gene, Wheelersburg. Ohio, PR 6-2655, GL 6-4191 
Bentley, James. Shelby Gap 

Beringer. William F., 907 Maple Ave., Dayton, CO 1-7152 
Bero, James J.. Box 968, Williamson, W. Va. 
Bibb, William C. 2416V. St. Ann St., Owensboro, MU 3-8973, 

MU 4-5261 
Black, Amos, 325 Moreland, Harrodsburg, 734-4775 
Black, Robert N., Route 3, Clinton, OL 3-6201, OL 3-3861 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blackburn. Viley O., 210 College, Somerset, 678-8986, 678- 

8171 
Blanton, Leonard, 2117 Washington, Flatwoods, 836-5597, 836- 

5623 ) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville. AM 5-2164 (Bus.) 
Bocook, Earl. 1102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Bocook, George Allen, 1906 Walnut St.. Kenova, W. Va. 
Boehm, Robert "Ted", 1812 Virgin St., Ashland, 324-6892, 

324-6641 
Bohan, James J., 5943 Oak Apple Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, MO 

1-1001, ME 1-0010 
Borden, W. B. "Jack", Cave City, PR 3-3364, PR 3-3671 
Bowling-, Boy. Route 1, Box 6, London, VO 4-4784, VO 4-4784 
Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

6-8111. 2-3343 
Boyd, Jerry A.. 215 West Blair, Richmond, 623-3734 
Bradshaw, Bill. Shakertown Road. Burgin, 748-5265, 748-5180 
Bradshaw, Frank, 2166 East Gum, Evansville, Indiana, OR 

6-6995, HA 5-6211 
Braughler, David L., 5659 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati 30, 

Ohio. BE 1-6364, JE 1-6214 
Brewer. Randell, P. O. Box 73, London, VO 4-5608, VO 4-2107 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, KI 1-6049, 

PA 1-1984 
Bridges, Bennie E., North Middletown, NM 4403, NM 4535 
Briscoe, Hubert, Route 3, Shelbyville. ME 3-4669, ME 3-2543 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6843, JU 

7-9111 
Brooks, Jerry M.. 1809 Williamsburg Rd., Lexington, 7-2590, 

2-0644 
Brown, Donald W.. Cavce, 2431 

Brown, Eddie W.. 162 Roberta Ave., Florence, 282,2427 
Brown, E. C, Whipp Ave., Liberty, 787-4421, 787-4101 
Brown. J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara, Danville, 236-3474, 236-6515 
Brown. James A., 500 Blane Dr., Hopkinsville, TU 6-6308 
Brown. Leonard C. 575 West Short St., Lexington, 2-2183, 2-2183 
Brown, Paul, 86 Boyd, Paintsville. 789-5323. 785-3410 
Brown, Thomas, 3598 Kenoak Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, EL 

1-6532, AV 1-7462 
Browning, Earl. 8716 Blossom Lane. Louisville 7. TW 2-2937 
Browning, William H.. Route 2, Box 113, Lebanon, 692-3396 
Brueck, Joe C, Jr., 2012 Wyandotte, Owensboro 
Brugh. Walter J., South Mayo Trail, Paintsville, 789-3698, 789- 

4511 
Brummett, Joseph W., P. O. Box 175, 519 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 

236-2158 
Bruner. Jack C, P. O. Box 458, London, VO 4-4322, VO 4-5189 
Bryan, William B., Route 4, Paris, No. Middletown 4228, 4264 
Buchanan. David K.. 24 Public Square, Elizabethtown, TO 

2-3321, RO 5-7303 
Buis. Nathaniel, Liberty, 787-3471. 787-2852 
Bunn, Harold, Route 1. Huntington, W. Va. 

Bunting, John L., Box 845, College Station, Murray, PL 3-1950 
Burkhart, James G.. Wallins. MO 5-3597 

Bunnell, Kenneth L., Munfordville, JA 4-2361, JA 4-2321 
Burchett, Lanier S., 1007 Appen Ave., Columbia, 384-2277, 

384-2411 
Burrows. Walter H. 

5376 

Butcher, Granville "Bo", Williamsport, 789-3521 (Bus.) 
Butler, Jack, 2039 7th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Butner, Billy M.. Route 2, Lancaster, 792-2604. 792-2459 
Butts. Delbert L., 107 Sterling Ave.. Mt. Sterling, 1313, 864R 
Byars, Michael Kirk, 1105 Slashes Rd., Lexington. 6-3269 
Byers, Laymon, Welchs Creek, Louisville 969-8263 (Bus.) 
Byrd. Harry G., 7331 Timberlane Drive, Maderia, Ohio. LO 

1-8745. JE 1-2281 
Cain, Paul D.. 3196 Lookout Cr., Cincinnati, Ohio, EA 1-7246, 

AV 1-9740 
Cain, Ronnie, 1312 Old Mill Rd., Lyndon, TW 3-2894, TW 

5-0567 
Caldwell, James, 14 Chesapeake, Newport, HI 1-1626, 397-2485 
Campbell, French, Allen, TU 4-2266 

Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd, Louisville. GL 1-8218, JU 7-8862 
Cantrell, Hubert, Campton, North 8-5312, North 8-5312 
Carnes. Richard, 110 Plenty, New Richmond, Ohio, RI 2-4172 
Carr, Martin L., Route 3, Cynthiana, 781-J, 680 
Carroll, Capt, George E., 5829A Brett, Ft. Knox, 4-1301, 

4-7740 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 9-4544 (Bus.) 
Cash, Randall E., 4504 Janice Way, Louisville, EM 7-8714, SP 

6-1281 
Cassady, Richard, Rockfield, 2-3544 

Cassell, Curtis. 1400 Carter Ave., Ashland, 324-5933, 324-3165 
Casteel, Ralph M., East Bernstadt, VI 3-2732, VI 3-2730 
Castle. Quentin, Nippa, CY 7-3756 
Gathers, Bob P. O. Box 158, Corbin, 1338, 465 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, PL 3-5367, PL 3-3245 
Catlett. David L., 4801 Fielding Way, Louisville, 447-3043, 

SP 6-2451 
Chafin, David L. Wheelwright, 437-7779, 3361 
Chambers, William Virgil, 1404 Raleigh Road Lexington, 4-8692 
Chattin, Ernie, 2147 Central, Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 
Clusky, Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
Cobb, Mike, Route 2, Central City, 1427-J 
Coleman, Daniel L., 415 West 21st St., Covington. AX 1-7070, 

MU 1-3262 
Coleman, James E., Phelps, GL 6-3407 (Bus.) 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr.. 2654 Southview Dr., Lexington, 

7-3672. 28205 
Colgan, Donald L., 424 Mt. Carmel, Flemingsburg, VI 5-3671, 

VI 5-6511 



Lee Road, Paducah, 442-3812, 443- 



Collins, Bob. Route 1, Elkton, 265-2844 (Bus.) 

Collins, Johnnie Hubert, Nippa, 789-5304 (Bus.) 

Collins, Larrv, 3148 Beech Ave., Covington, AX 1-8616, ME 

1-0010 
Combs, W. Eugene, Route 2. Box 239, Hazard 
Combs, Franklin Delano, Jeff. GE 6-4280 
Combs, Keith A., 1304 Mac Arthur Drive, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-2869, HA 5-2215 PM, & HA 4-0028 AM 
Combs, Roy Donald, c/o Engle Funeral Home, Hazard, GE 

6-2820, GE 6-2135 
Combs, William E., 1300 McArthur Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4277, HA 3-4435 
Conley, George D., 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, 324-6042 
Connell. Jerry L.. 406 9th St., Williamsburg. 6265 
Conway, James M., 113 Phillips, Frankfort, CA 7-4268, CA 

7-2206 
Cooksey, Adrian, 5203 Rural Way, Louisville, SP 2-9544 
Cooper. Hewlett, Hazel Road. Murray, PL 3-3336, PL 3-3381 
Cooper, John F., Route 2. Foster. PL 6-4608 
Cooper, John Wellington. P. O. Box 1, Danville, 236-2136, 

236-9825 
Cooper, Warren, 120 Barber Court, Morehead, ST 4-4595, 

ST 4-4390 
Corley. William H.. Box 37, Simpsonville, 722-8868. 722-8995 
Cornett, Billy J., 784th ACWron, P. O. Box 7902, Ft. Knox, 

4-4040 (Bus.) 
Cornett, John M., Box 185, Hindman, St 5-5327, ST 5-4871 
Corrao, Phillip J.. 2321 Coyle Dr., New Albany, Indiana, WH 

4-9990. WH 4-3912 
Coryell, Francis W., 616 West Southern Heights, Louisville, 

363-9774 
Coudret, Raymond J., Jr., 3704 Conlin, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4259, HA 5-3339 
Courtney, Walt, 1809 Beacon Hill, Lexington. 2-8879 
Covington, Ralph, 122 Royal Spring, Georgetown, 108 
Cox, Ralph, Box 555, Benham, Cumberland 589-4792 
Cox, Rufus A., 347 Branch, Madisonville, TA 1-2420, DU 3-3301 
Cox, William J., 148 Holly, Pineville, ED 7-3209, Harlan 721 
Crabtree. Charles Edward, Box 97, Simpsonville, PA 2-5133, 

PA 2-6202 
Craft, Bill, 638 Longview, Lexington, 7-4843, 4-9223 
Crager, Bobby F., Prestonsburg 
Crawford, Tom, 2146 Algonquin Parkway, Louisville, SP 

2-7504. JU 4-3211 
Creech, Harvey J.. Leatherwood, OR 5-3061 (Bus.) 
Creekmore, Ken. Route 1, Box 667, Bristol, SO 4-6241 (Bus.) 
Crocetti, Dom, 8002 Cedar Way, Louisville 19, 969-1895, WE 

7-2300 
Cropper, William Clay, Route 2, May's Lick, 503-2601, 603- 

2601 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr.. 1236 76th St. North, St. Petersburg, 

Fla.. 344-6361, 5-2151 
Crutcher, James W., 3210 Cawein Way, Louisville, GL 8-6830, 

EM 6-5688 
Gulp, Willard E., Hqts, 326 Eng. Bn., Ft. Campbell, 4622, 4048 
Cummins, Albert, P. O. Box 305, Cvnthiana, 815, 7002 
Cunningham, Julian, Mt. Sterling, 1055J3, 1600 
Curnutte. James R., 201 East 8th Ave., Huntington, W, Va. 
Dalton, Ray H., 4707 Dohn Rd., Louisville 16, 447-3449, EM 

6-6612 
Dame, L. J., 604 Ridgewood, Owensboro, MU 4-5681, MU 

3-2401 ext. 300 
Damico, Ernie, 1758 East McMilan, Cincinnati, Ohio, WO 

1-5755, DU 1-2200 ext. 370 
Daniels. Robert A., Van Lear. 789-5014 
Daum, Charles A., 216 Christ Rd., Evansville 10, Indiana, HA 

4-0217, HA 2-8805 
Davis, Bunny, 694 W. Lexington, Danville, 236-2606, 236- 

2200 e.xt. 250 
Davis, David Allen, 5629 Stewart, Portsmouth, Ohio, PR 6-7206 
Davis, Harold T., Bowling Green, VI 3-9103 
Davenport. Sam C, Jr., P. O. Box 7, Jellico, Tenn., 434-6400, 

424-6555 
Davis, Ralph E.. 1007 Front, Vanceburg, SW 6-4501, SW 6-2521 
Davis, William P., 1003 6th St.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Day, Bill E., Hazel Green, MO 2-2487. NO 8-3831 
Demunbrun, Murphy M., 536 W. Main, Richmond, 623-5511, 

623-3670 
Dennedy, T. Robert, 352 VanVorst, Bellevue, CO 1-9777, PO 

1-7600 
Denney, Murrell C, Eubank, 379-3602. 379-4440 
Denton. Charles, 1427 Clay. Henderson, VA 6-4020, VA 6-3196 
DeVary, Bill, Box 404, Middlesboro, 1587 
Dierolf, Maj. William H., Jr., 1487-B Werner Park, Fort 

Campbell, 5144, 3210 
DiMuzio, Robert D., 6422 (Solfway Dr.. Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

KI 1-2220, MA 1-9256 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine St., Cincinnati 19, Ohio, AV 1-0136, 

AV 1-9264 
Distler, Marvin, 8036 Sheed Rd., Cincinnati 39, Ohio, JA 1-3110, 

JA 1-3110 
Divine, James Ralph, Route 1, Bremen, Central City 988-M2 
Dixon, Charles T.. Box 309. Burkesville, 3302, 39 
Dixon, Kenneth. 268 Turner Ave., Irvine. 723-2366 
Dobson, Kenneth, Route 3, Paducah. 442-0778, 443-4534 
Dodge, Bruce B.. Jr., 6606 Miles Ave., Louisville, 361-2027, 

JU 3-4441 
Dodson, Winston. 213 Greenbriar Road, Lexington, 7-2598, 

2-2250 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 19G1 



Page Nine 



Dorsey, James, 1110 Gilsey, Cincinnati. Ohio. GR 1-8050 
Dotson. John B.. Route 1, HaiTisburg. Illinois, CL 3-6971 
Dotson. W. S., 432 E. 5th St.. Lexington. 2-5131. 4-0350 
Doyle. Donald, 229 Risen Ave., Campbellsville, 466-4789, 465- 

4561 
Drake, Neal M.. 246 E. Third. Lexington, 2-6406 
Drake, Richard R. "Dick". 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas, HI 

1-4235 
Draud, Jon E., 2441 Alexandria Park, Southgate, St 1-2109 
Draughn, Bartram, Hindman, ST 5-4845 
Driskell, Earl, Jr.. 660 So. 44th St., Louisville, SP 8-5943 

Guy K.. Jr.. Richmond Road, Bei-ea, 986-3953, 986-3411 
William Robert, Box 480, Lancaster 
Duncan, James H., Route 2, Russellville, PA 6-6767. VI 3-9182 
Durkin. Jack H., 291 Burke Road, Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
Dyer, Joe R., Route 2, Kirksey, HU 9-2677, HU 9-2677 
Eades, Jim. South Carrollton 
Eaton. James Marvin, 2016 Merriewood Dr., Owensboro, MU 

4-1188 
Edelen, Ben R., 3203 Klondike Lane, Louisville, GL 4-3518, GL 

2-2611 
Edwards, Donald A., 119 E. Main St., Sebree, 5-7537, 5-7816 
Edwards. Lloyd, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2998 
Eldridge, James R., Haldeman, ST 4-6792 (Bus.) 
Elkins. R. Percy, 481 High St., Jenkins, 979, 58 
Ellington, James E., Box 841, Hazard, GE 6-3648, GE 6-3434 
Elliott, Carroll L., 214 Sunset Road, Elizabethtown, RO 6-4007 

RO 6-6118 
Elovitz. Carl, 1920 Spring Grove, Lexington, 7-3994, TR 3-4901 
Elrod, Turner, 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-5110. 2-0341 
Embry, Dr. Chalmer P., 1518 Stop N'Shop Court. Owensboro, 

MU 3-2131, MU 3-3214 
Engle, Orville. 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst, Edward R., Box 68, Hebron, 689-7181, 921-8336 
Fairchild, Kenton, Inez. 4883 

Fallon, Robert, 101 Cleveland Ave., Hazard. 6-2151, 6-4528 
Farley, Jimmy, 1063 New Circle. Lexington, 5-4477 (Bus.) 
Farmer, Ralph. 100 Liberty St.. Somerset, 679-1246. 678-8194 
Featherston. Jerry, Route 3, Clinton, OL 3-6926 
Feher, A. J., 600 Main St., Lynch, 848-2717, 848-5431 
Feix, AI. 1502 N. Elm St., Henderson, VA 7-3321, VA 6-3012 
Ferguson, Ford, Route 2, Waverly, Ohio, 8033-R, 8107-M 
Ferrell, Doctor T., 409 Greenbriar. Lexington, 7-4273, 4-0301 
Fields. Joe D.. Route 1. Gilbei-tsville, 362-4965 
Finley, Albert R., 2819 Faircourt, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4108, TU 

Flaugher, Allen, Route 1, Brooksville, RE 5-2924, CO 1-5620 

ext. 384 
Florence, Darrell. 1934 Portland Ave., Louisville, SP 2-3326 
Floyd, Raymond, 205 Huffacker, Somerset, 9-2443, 9-9972 
Flynn, Reynolds, Phillip, 1009 Banklick St., Covington, Hem- 
lock 1-5080 (Bus.) 
Flynn. Robert D.. 110 Halls Lane, Lexington, 4-7924, 2-9474 
Ford, Bobby Franklin, Box 111, Auxier, Prestonsburg TU 6-3356 
Ford, Joe, 600 Hillside Dr.. Mayfield. CH 7-5886, 247-6242 
Foster, Berryman E.. 927 Waverly Road. Lexington. 3-1827, 

2-7847 
Foster, J. W.. 821 Carneal Road, Lexington 4-8058. 3-3336 
Fraley, Bill 407 Monterrey, Owensboro, MU 4-4663, MU 3-1656 
Francis, Wendell, 419 Milton Ave., Glasgow, OL 1-5687, OL 

1-3111 
Franklin. Robert. Marion. 5-4650, 5-4226 

Frazier, William L., 1436 Center St.. Catlettsburg. 739-5896 
Freese, Ollie, 5518 Manle Ridge. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark, Richmond, 623-4966 
Fugate. E. Hugh. Price, FR 7-2911, Prestonsburg, TU 6-6261 
Fuller, John R.. Jr.. Route 8 Epperson Rd., Paducah, 898-3115 
Fuller. Phillip, Star Route, Box 16 Phelps 

Furgerson, W. W. 1711 Ryan. Murray. PL 3-1336. PL 3-2310 
Fuson. Shelvie. 312 Englewood Rd. Middlesborough. 1541, 263 
Gaddis, George M. Route 1, St. Joseph, MU 3-8282 (Bus.) 
Gaither, Gene, P. O. Box 103, Beaver Dam, BR 4-4357, BR 

4-3638 
Gardner, Howard, McCullum, Elizabethtown, RO 5-6273, Ft. 

Knox 4-6638 
Gentry, Charles C, Route 1, Oak Grove, ID 1-3405, ID 1-3440 
Gerding, Jim, 1007 Patterson, Newport. AX 1-5152, CH 1-4762 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 2-5494 
Gibson, Fred W., 738 1st St., Henderson. VA 6-9416. VA 

6-9416 
Gilbert, Gerald, L., Tunnel Hill Road, Elizabethtown, Ft, 

Knox 4-7759 (Bus.) 
Gilbert, Gordon J., 301 Brookwood Ave.. Hamilton, Ohio, TW 

2-3678 
Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch", 208 Southern Dr,, Campbellsville, 

465-7697, 465-6091 
Gill, Joe, 456 Marimon Ave., Harrodsburg, 734-2729, 734-4195 
Gilligan, Jack, 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 2-2042 
Gillem, Gail W., Keaton, AM 6-2857 
Glaysbrook, James, Hodge St., Madisonville. TA 1-2596, TA 

1-6533 
Goff, Richard P.. Steff 

Goley, Jim, 31 Wallace, Florence, AT 3-2812, AX 1-5447 
(kilden, Billy Joe, 568 East Main. Lynch, 848-2512, 848-2512 
Golden, Laura Lou, 568 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Gooch, Lloyd E., Herndon Ave., Stanford, 366-7259 
Goodall, Walter J., 820 Park, Newport, AX 1-9470, CO 1-3313 
Gour, Robert A. (Bob), 233 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 

3-9582, VI 2-0341 ext, 241 



Gourley, Harold E.. 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6191, HA 3-4016 
Gossett, Jack, 1113 Maple Ave.. Ashland. 324-2294, 324-7040 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, ED 7-3331, ED 7-2392 
Gray, Raymond, Livermore, BR 8-2615 
Greene, Omar Paul, 2244V, Harris, Norwood, Ohio, 631-8996, 

351-5142 
Grigsby, Pete, Jr., East McDowell, FR 7-2923, FR 7-6202 
Gustafson, Al Jr.. 248 Francis Bldge., Louisville, GL 4-6151, 

JU 4-2068. & JU 4-7656 
Hackel, John C, Jr., 3409 Burrell Dr.. Louisville, 16, EM 

8-8207 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr.. 942 Wolf Run Road, Lexington. 6-5332, 

2-7866 
Haffey, Stan, 1243 Garden Circle, Cincinnati 15, Ohio, MU 

1-2420 (Bus.) 
Hagan, Joe "Red", 3000 Sherbrood Rd., Louisville. GL 8-1325, 

Seneca High School 
Hagedorn, Thomas, 434 W. 11th St., Newport, AX 1-5793, KI 

1-1800 ext. 1147 
Hale. Don C, 145 Loraine Ct.. Berea, 986-4372 
Hall. Mac, Route 1, Box 178, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hamilton, Steve. Morehead State College, Morehead 
Hamm, L. E. (Louie), Route 3, Mayfield, MA 3-3277, CH 

7-5570 
Hardy. J. Alvin. 3412 Calais Dr.. Jeffersontown, AN 7-7390, 

AN 7-7390 
Hardin, Jack H., 1106 B Street, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Hardin, William R., Box 171, Inez, 298-3568, 298-3585 
Hargis, Bobby S., Box 3, Calvert City, 395-4849, 395-4181 
Harris, Billy, Box 143, Cleaton, Central City 759-R2, 45 
Harper, Robie, Jr.. Beechmont. Drakesboro GR 6-2264 
Hatfield, Cecil E, Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hatfield, Dennis, 1610 May St.. Covington, HE 1-4234 
Hatler, Elton L., 28V> Ashland, Winchester, PI 4-3814 
Hatter. Jack, 1664 A'msterdam Rd., Covington, EA 1-2444, GA 

1-9929 
Hausfeld, Walter, 3080 Crestmoor, Cincinnati, Ohio, MO 1-1253, 

JA 1-0080 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancy Farm, MA 3-3641, MA 3-9111 
Heitzman. Warren E., 7291 Memor-y Lane, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

PO 1-4100, 1861 or 2015 
Hendon, L. J., 106 South 12th St., Murray, PL 3-3668, PL 

3-2825 
Hendricks, Dudley, 620 W. Main. Richmond. 623-3680 
Henley, Jimmy L., 313 N. 16th St.. Murray 
Henson, Tony, Route 4, Mayfield. NR 6-3721. CH 7-5743 
Herold, Clarence E., Route 1 Sacramento, 625-6666 
Hertzberger, Robert T.. 2736 Marion. Evansville. Indiana. HA 

4-1681. HA 5-6211 
Hicks. Don, Route 1 Boaz, 444-7858 
Hicks, Floyd E. 30 West 36th St., Covington, HE 1-1126, RE 

1-2121 Line 250 
Higgins. Bobby Dick, Slaughters 

Hill, Earl F., Route 1, Box 49- A. London, 4-2521 
Hill, Martin, North 6th St., Williamsburg, 3171 , 
Hiten, John W.. 722 Melrose Ave., Lexington, 6-2759. 2-2868 
Hitt, Billy D., Route 2. May's Lick, 503-2608, 564-5327 
Hobby, Bill, 907 Mechanic, Princeton, EM 5-5196, EM 5-2051 

HA 4-6411 
Hodge, Fred. 2011 Joyce Ave., Evansville, Indiana, GR 7-2993, 

HA 4-6411 
Hoferer, Louis R., 4833 Corinth Ave., Cincinnati 17, Ohio, 

RE 1-8430, WA 1-9841 
Hoffeld, Bernie, 172 Rugby Road, Lexington, 3-0517, 2-2250 

Hofstetter, Joe, Box 2173. Williamson. W. Va. 

Holbrook, Arthur. Leatherwood 

Holbrook, B. J., 313 Stockton Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-4802 

Holeman, Bill R., Box 433, Manchester, LY 8-2289 

Holmes, Robert D., 600 East Locust, Princeton, EM 6-5129, 

EM 5-2028 
Holtzclaw, James R., Route 4, Stanford. Hustonville 346-2396, 

Lexington 5-3025 
Hook, Burnley B., Jr., Route 5, Paducah, 443-4610. 443-3738 
Ho:-ton. John, t:, Columbia Ave., Monticello, Filmore 8-2311 
Howard, Henry D.. Kettle Island. ED 7-2996. ED 7-2360 
Howard, Oscar D., Box 93E, Route 1, Corbin 
Howell, Jerome "Buddy", Jr., 134 Allenwood Di-., Clarks- 

ville. Tenn. 
Huber, Jerry, 2873 W. McMicken, Cincinnati, Ohio, MU 1-0897, 

HE 1-6346 
Hudnall, William E., 313 Creekview, Paris, 2073, Winchester 

PL 4-5969 
Huffman, Charles E., Box 182, Worthington. 836-6572 
Huggins. Jim. 361 Sumpter Ave., Bowling Green, 842-5519 
Huiet, F. "Whitey", 7327 Osceola Dr., Maderia 43, Ohio, 

LO 1-9239. CH 1-4768 
Hulsey. Donald, 1222 E. Delaware, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

5-3677, WO 3-3124 
Hummer, Irby, 206 College, Hodgenville, EL 8-3009. EL 8-3OO0 
Hunley, Neil P.. 386 Main St., West Liberty. SH 3-3131. 

SH 3-3705 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson. W. Va. 
Hutchinson. Jack T.. Martin, BU 5-3427 
Huter, Jim, 3643 Vermont, Louisville, SP 6-0707, Henryville, 

Indiana 2271 
Hyland. F. D. Box 465. South Webster, Ohio, PR 8-2401, 

Waverly 5100 ext. 2165 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Hynson, Fred R., 441 Kingsway Dr., Lexington, 6-4285 
Inman, Briscoe, 476 Boone Trail, Danville, 236-5740. 236-5211 
Irwin, Charlie. Route 4, Hopkinsville. TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Isaacs. John F., 1337 E. Cooper, Lexington, 6-4887. 2-2220 
Jackson. Dennis M., 121 Spruce, Murray, PL 3-5015, PL 3-5015 
Jackson. Roy T.. Main St., Sebi-ee 

James, Gene, 316 Park Ave., Ironton, Ohio, JB 2-6976, JE 2-7724 
James, William V., 2812 Chippewa Dr., Owensboro, 684-6352 
Jenkins. James D., Route 1, Bowling Green. 842-3088, VI 2-5954 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4887, 

RO 5-6247 
Jennings. Joseph L., 348 Bonnie Leslie Ave.. Bellevue, HI 

1-1532. DU 1-2000 Ext. 662 
Jett. Philip D.. 626 Coronado Ct.. Paducah, 442-4100, 442-2711 
Johnson, Frank W., 224 South Mulberry, Elizabethtown, RO 

6-6021, RO 6-4606 
Johnson, Gerry R., 626 N. Main St., Russellville, PA 6-2673 
Johnson, James L., 1331 Center St., Bowling Green, 2-7683 
Johnson, Joe R., 106 South 3rd St., Central City. 947-R, 947-J 
Johnson, Vernon Lee, Jr., Route 2, Box 370, Falmouth, OL 

4-5771, OL 4-5771 
Johnson, Walter, Box 397, Grayson, 474-6908, 474-5721 
Johnson, William Bernard, Route 7, Hopkinsville, AM 9-2208, 

TU 5-5366 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson, Campbellsville, 465-5953 
Jones, Carson G., 713 North Main, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

2-3069, 4-7741 ext. 360 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, GL 

8-1293 JU 3-7697 
Jones, Paul, 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown. RO 5-4602 
Jordan. Arthur C Jr.. 526 Dalton St., Owensboro. MU 3-1024 
Jordan. Ken. 104 West Orchard Rd., Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-2747, 

GA 1-3100 
Junker, Edwin, 1046 West Seymour, Cincinnati 16, Ohio, VA 

1-4117, VA 1-2322 
Kaler, Jerry Don, 618 Coronado Ct., Paducah, 444-7960 
Keene, Marcum, Biggs, 835-2267 
Kensler, Orville A., 9030 G Estrada, Radcliff, Ft. Knox 4-3882, 

Ft. Knox 4-1256 
Kercher, Norman, 2506 Proctor Knott, Louisville, GL 2-2969, 

GL 2-2969 
Kerr, Warren R., 1932 Madison St., Paducah, 443-7938 
Kessler, Robert H., 1620 Oleanda Ave., Apt. No. 1, Louis- 
ville, EM 6-3780, SP 8-6531 
Key, Calvin, Hazel, 492-3431, 492-2341 

Kidd. Roy. 116 Longview Dr.. Richmond. 623-4040, 623-4959 
Kilgore, Roger, Maloneton, YE 2-3495, YE 2-3611 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, Drakesboro GR 6-2666 
King, David L., Route 1, West Paducah, 488-1106, 488-1106 
King, James A., 2409 Griffith, Louisville, SP 8-3690, SP 6-2466 
King. P. J.. 307 Coast Guard Lane. Owensboro. 3-2401 (Bus.) 
Kirkwood, Patrick, 306 Braden, Hopkinsville, TU 6-7409, TU 

6-1268 
Kleinschmidt, Richard, 3830 Burwood, Norwood 12, Ohio, 

EL 1-6574, EL 1-5574 
Knight, Bill, 752 North 36th St., Paducah, 443-2775, 443-2776 
Kremer, Joseph A., 3727 Glenmeade Rd., Louisville. GL 4-3991, 

JU 7-0026 
Kuhl, Lawrence, 212, Chester Ave., Middlesboro, 2988 
Lackey. James H.. 1801-12th St.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Lally, James J., 4799 Guerley Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-7282 
Lamb, Paul. 427 Carlisle. Lexington. 5-4126. 3-3336 
Lambert. Kenneth L.. 2221 Bayard Park Dr.. Evansville, 

Indiana. GR 6-6146, HA 5-5252 
Lance, Walter, 2319 Maple St., Owensboro, MU 3-3974, MU 

3-1691 
Landolt, Gene. 1002 Payne, Murray, PL 3-4707, PL 3-1893 
Lankert, Norman E., 307 N. Sherwood, Clarksville, Indiana, 

BU 2-3368 
Lashbrook, Gene, 636 Crittenden St., Owensboro, MU 3-5481, 

MU 3-2431 
Laubheimer, Donald Travis. 703 Lynn Dr.. Lexington, 6-2080 

(Bus.) 
Lawrence, Alvin L., 211/, Alta Vista. Walton, 486-4643, DU 

1-2000 e.xt. 488 
Lawson, Rondall. Lakewood Terrace, Apt. No. 4, Morehead 
Lay, William B., 1621 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 2-6829, 2-2250 

ext. 2668 
Lee, Arnold Joseph, Burkesville, 4620, 145 
Lee, Charles J.. 316 Scott St.. Lexington. 2-3003. 3-4721 
Lee, Douglas, Alva, MO 4-2010 
Lee, Robert L„ 217 Ridgeway Ave., Louisville, TW 6-6497, 

TW 5-2431 
Lehkamp, Kenneth, 749 South Ft. Thomas, Ft. Thomas HI 1-1476 
Leonhardt, Donald, Route 5, Box 347A, Evansville, Indiana, 

UN 7-5217. HA 4-2247 
LeVan, T. F., P. O. Box 31. Benton. LA 7-3221, LA 7-4521 
Lewis. Charles H., Willisburg, 375-2766 
Lewis. Charles Odell. Route 6. Bowling Green, VI 2-1038 
Lewis. Donald. Harlan. 1289. 816 
Lewis, Howard, 939 Florence Ln., Louisville, EM 6-6911, CH 

5-4161 
Liles, Bill C. Route 8, Paducah, 898-2131 
Lindon, David William, Insko, MO 2-2428 
Lindsey, Jack, Box 36, Blackey, Whitesburg 7765 
Little, Bernard, P. O. Box 24, Hi Hat, FR 7-6231 (Bus.) 
Little, Ronnie, Pomeroyton, SO 8-3345, SO 8-3346 
Little, Thomas N., 1001 Birch, Benton, LA 7-5941, LA 7-2581 



Littlepage, Pryce B., 22 Midway, Madisonville, TA 1-1642 
Lloyd, Julius C, 5820 Apt. A, Fort Carson, Colorado 
Logsdon, David L., 1160 Lincoln, Louisville, ME 1-3921, SP 

6-3192 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde, Louisville, TW 6-8731 
Long, Marshall, Route 3. Shelbyville, ME 3-3213, ME 3-3181 
Longenecker. David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, TW 6-9071, 

TW 6-3401 ext. 301-302 
Looney, Dick, Myra Barnes Ave., Pikeville, GE 7-6410 
Louden, Hubert C, 332 Scout St., Louisville, GL 1-9796, JU 

7-8411 
I>oudy, Kenneth, Slemp, OR 6-4278 
Lowe, Eugene T., Route 1, Box 12, London, VO 4-6724, VO 

4-2207 
Lucas, Gene T., 100 Lemons Mill Rd., Georgetown, 1371 
Lykins, Joe D., Malone 

Lyons, Charles S., Route 2, Sharpsburg, CH 7-2457 
Lytle, William Price, P. O. Box 1297, Columbus, Georgia, FA 

3-3744, MU 9-5180 
McAnelly. David F., Liberty, 787-4371, 787-2711 
McBee. William K., 76 Elwood, Burlington, 586-6462, 586-6183 
McCargo. Frank. 916 West 7th St., Hopkinsville, TU 6-1660, 

TU 5-9400 
McCarter, Bobby, Route 6, Hopkinsville, Ft. Campbell 3320 



McClearn, Al, Clarksville High School, Clarksville, Tenn. 647- 

3873 
McClellan, L. B., Jr., 2612 Goldsmith Lane, Louisville, GL 8- 

2598, JU 7-9111 ext 3A 
McCowan, Connell, Route 1, Box 261, Corbin, 2361 
McCoy, Hayse, Box 265, Inez, 298-3417, Warfield 395-5341 
McDonald, Leslie Legon, P. O. Box 192, Greenville, 936, Cen- 
tral City 1000 
McFall, Gene G., Nancy, 678-4825, 274-3181 
McGehee, Gordon, 4529 CaiToll, Covington, CO 1-6880 
McGlothlin, Leonard, 918 Jackson St., Owensboro, MU 3-4318, 

ext. 291 (Bus.) 
McGuffey, Harold B., Smiths Grove, LO 3-2022, LO 3-3031 
McHenry, Louis P., 408yo Main St., Hopkinsville, JU 6-2601, 

JU 6-2813 
McKinney, Adelle F., 5370-G Fisher Ave., Ft. Knox, 4-6169, 

4-4835 
McMullan, Cecil E., Route 2, Golden Pond. WA 4-5604 
McMillin. Lan-y L.. Route 6. Cynthiana. 852-M4 
McNeely. Albert T., 601 Leslie Ave.. P. O. Box 203, Glasgow, 

OL 1-3290, OL 1-2094 
McPeek, Stewart Dorton 
McPike, Ray S., Jr., 309 Theatre Bldg., Louisville, GL 1-3832, 

JU 6-2832 
Macon, Alan Leon, 6215 Apex Dr., Louisville 19, 969-1631, 

JU 4-1361 ext. 374 
Madon, Robert Lee, Virginia Ave., Pineville, ED 7-2436 
Maddox, Donald, 632 W. Center, Madisonville, TA 1-6346 
Mahan, Carle "Buddy", Hampton Manor, Winchester, PI 4-4550, 

Lexington 2-0290 
Mahanes, Tom, Route 7, Lexington, 6-7366, Georgetown 9105 
Malone, Donald R., 2630 South 13th St., Ironton, Ohio, 632-4086, 

532-6224 
Markert, Thomas, Jr., 2412 Jolissaint Ave., New Albany, 

Indiana. WH 4-8220, WH 4-2668 
Martin, Charlie, Box 63, Sharpsburg, CH 7-2131, CH 7-2611 
Martin. Robert E., 608 First St.. Henderson, VA 6-4048 
Masters, Lester. Big Stone Gap, Va. 

Matthews, Dr. Lyle, 105 Albany Rd. Monticello, FI 8-3286 (Bus.) 
Mattingly, Bernard, Box 183, Cloverport, SU 8-3308 
Maxwell, James E., Smith Ave., Warsaw. JO 7-2001, JO 7-2001 
May, Bobby, Willisburg, 376-2257 

May, E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2314, TU 6-8661 
Mayes. Edward. 838 Crossbill Rd., Danville, 236-3264, 236-6131 
Meade, "Sid" Foster, Box 63, South Portsmouth, YE 2-3584, 

YE 2-3221 
Meier, Dwight L., Box 286. Kemmerer. Wyoming UL 8-3572 
Melmige. Jim, Box 74. Matewan. W. Va. 

Metcalf. Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Rd.. Paducah. 442-1359 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, BL 1-3459, 

PA 1-4334 
Middleton, Johnny, 219 Langford Ct.. Richmond. 623-1682 
Milbern. Daniel L.. 441 Morgan Ave.. Lexington. 6-2148, IBM 

ext. 2603 
Miller, Bob, 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas. HI 1-5885, UN 1-8000 
Miller, Claude O., 704y, Tenth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller, Jack, College St., Barbourville, LI 6-3966 (Bus.) 
Miller, Rex. 2711 Greenway Rd.. Ashland. 324-5023, 324-6641 
Miller, Roy J.. 544 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Indiana, BU 3-6335. 

EM 6-6286 
Miller, Roy L., Belton, Drakesboro GR 6-2666 
Miller, Leon Victor, 23 Pine Hill Dr., Highland Heights, 

ST 1-0619, HE 1-3778 
Millerhaus, Bill, 923 Harris, Cincinnati 6, Ohio, GR 1-7904. 

WA 1-9722 
Minton, Eugene H., 901 S. Green, Henderson, VA 7-3193 
Mitchell, Emmett D., 120 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 5-3511. 

4-0032 
Mitchell, James, 317 Warrendale, Georgetown 
Mobley, Tony Allen, Apt. B-9, Seminary Village, Fenley Ave., 

Louisville 
Moll, Francis B.. 820 Mulberry. Mount Vernon, Indiana, PO 

3-2870, PO 3-4489 
Monahan, Ed, 6821 Tarawa Dr„ Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 1-6582 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Page Eleven 



Montgomery. Gordon D., 1112 Hustonville Rd., Danville, 236- 

3116, 236-2314 
Moore. Charles H.. 218 E. Crest Dr.. Cincinnati 15, Ohio, PO 

1-0290. VA 1-3889 
Moore. James E.. Route 5. Box 91A. London. VO 4-2054. VO 

4-5114 
Moore. Robert. Jr.. 441 Forest Ave., Erlanger. DI 1-6837, HE 

1-2174 
Moore. Roy Jr.. 309 Johnson St.. London. VO 4-5023, VO 4-4121 
Morgan, William W., 109 Grandview Dr., Hopkinsville, TU 

6-1540, GE 9-4933 
Morse. Richard K.. 163 N. Deepwood Dr.. Radcliff, 351-3748, 

Ft. Knox 4-4444 
Moser. Emerson. Sebree. TE 5-7769. VA 6-2793 
Moser. Rudy. Route 1. Dixon. ME 9-5317 

Moss Julian. 106 Dickerson Ct.. Lancaster. 792-2954. 792-2711 
Mouser. H, D.. Princeton Rd.. Madisonville. TA 1-4864, TA 

1-2644 
Mudd. Ed. 3512 Mildred Dr.. Louisville. SP 6-6888 
Mulligan. J. T.. 427 Center. Erlanger, DI 1-5628 
Murphy. Donald. 8875 Long Lane. Cincinnati 31. Ohio, WE 

1-3189 
Murray. Thomas. 611 Edgecliff. Covington. HE 1-1929 
Murrell. Allen Leslie. 1804 Wood Hurst. Bowling Green, 842- 

1286 
Musselman, Thomas. Box 5165. Cherokee Station, Louisville, 

GL 1-5130. GL 8-1585 
Mussman. Ralph, Jr.. 502 Monroe, Newport, JU 1-4562, CO 

1-1300 
Myers, Edward B.. 312 Seay. Glasgow, OL 1-2948, OL 1-3227 
Myers, Lee E., P. O. Box 46. Big Stone Gap, Va. 
Nantz, Wilburn, Wooton. 279-2536 
Nau, Bill, Clark St.. Barbourville, 6-4112, 6-3057 
Napier, Walter, Jr.. Box 199. Loyal. 1906-W, 753 
Nash. William R.. Grayson, 474-5144 (Bus.) 
Neal, Gene, Davis Pike, Route 1, Batavia, Ohio, AV 1-4630, 

SK 3-5908 
Neal, James, 1222 Girvin Ct., Owensboro, MU 4-3094 
Neal, Marion, 2215 8th St., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-3948, EL 

Nelson, Bernard L.. 103 Maple St., Ix>uisa, ME 8-4374, Ashland 

324-0710 
Nelson, Charles L., Bremen. 3464 
Nelson. William O.. Route 1. Greenville 
Newman. Earl B.. 602 6th St.. Paintsville. 789-4227 
Newman. Luther G.. Beattyville. IN 4-2560. IN 4-8132 
Newton. C. M.. 2041 Dellwood Drive. Lexington. 7-2865, 4-2431 
Nickell. Carl Duane. 2009 Broad St.. Paducah. 444-6195 
Nie. Allen F.. 1031 Isabella. Newport. AX 1-6847. CO 1-1725 
Nixon. James W.. 2713 Canton. Hopkinsville. TU 6-2641 
Noble. Charles B.. 1164 Main St.. Jackson. NO 6-2728, NO 

6-9224 
Noble. Leonard, 439 Court St.. Jackson. NO 6-2430. NO 6-2887 
Noel, Robert A., 26 W. Hickman. Winchester. PI 4-1265 
Noel. John W.. 148 East 42nd St.. Covington. CO 1-3397 
Nord. Ed. 1734 South 23rd St.. Louisville. SP 4-1958. TW 5-3401 

ext. 202 
Nunn. Wesley L., Star Route, Brandenburg, 422-3326, 422-4560 
O'Daniel, Jeff, Route 1, Lebanon, 692-2378 
Okruch, Nicholas, 401 Parkland, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-3740, HA 4-3331 
Oldham, Charles M. 110 Frederica, Hartford 
Oldham, John H.. Route 1, Box 79A, Prospect. CA 8-1698 
Omer. Billy W.. 225 Reed Ave.. Madisonville. TA 1-2833 
O'Nan. Harold Lee. 1927 Washington. Henderson. VA 6-4898 
Osborne. Homer L.. 418 Broadway. Hazard. 6-3894, 6-4992 
Osborne, Kenneth. Apt. 1. Holbrook Hall. Morehead 
Overly. William H.. Limestone. Somerset. 678-5275, 678-5275 
Overton. Frank. Jr.. Four Mile. ED 7-2026, 7-2435 
Pack. James W., Route 1. Box 25. Catlettsburg. 739-4600 
Padgett. R. K.. 202Vi College St.. Somerset. 678-5485, 678-4141 
Page, Frank, Jr.. Route 2. Mayfield. 623-3775 
Palmer, Carl A.. 2506 South 7th St.. Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-6244 
Palumbo, Arthur O., Annville Institute. Annville. EM 4-2045, 

EM 4-2721 
Park. J. M.. 924 Yarbro Lane. Paducah. 444-6567 
Parker. Billy E., P. O. Box 731. Pineville, 7-3293 
Patrick. Ralph. 4321 Grandview Dr. Ashland, 324-7535, 324-1111 

ext. 566 
Patterson, Jimmy, Hustonville, 346-2711, 346-2711 
Paulin, Al, 538 Franklin St.. Tell City, Indiana, KI 7-3323, 

KI 7-3323 
Payne, Gayle, Bethlehem. UP 8-5980 
Payne. James L.. Pleasureville. UP 8-2161. 484-2202 
Peeno, Harry R.. 30 Butler. Ludlow. JU 1-7335 
Penner, Merritt D. Jr., Route 2, Box 528, Manchester, LY 8-4098 
Penrod, Joe B.. 1203 Locust. Owensboro. MU 3-8773, MU 4-1175 
Pergrem, Nard, 3315 Pine Haven Drive, Ashland, 324-7664, 

324-1155 ext. 288 
Perry, George B., Route 2. Princeton, EM 5-2633, EM 5-2635 
Perry, James E.. Route 6. Paducah. 443-6740. 444-7251 
Petty. John F.. Route 1. Gracey. AD 5-5063, AD 6-5063 
Pike, Carl W.. Jr.. Hartford. CY 8-3201 (Bus.) 
Pike. Robert F.. 242 South 2nd.. Richmond. 623-4708 
Pittman. R. Spencer. 1481/. Catter Ave.. Somerset. 679-1389 
Phelps. Ralph "Rudy". Box 633. Russell. 836-3670, Ashland 

324-1165 ext. 258 
Phelps. Ray. Box 633. Russell, 836-3670 



Piper, James K.. B 212 Shawneetown. Lexington, 2-9341, 2-9341 
Plumlee, Harold M., 713 Milliken Road, Paducah, 442-8678 
Points, Charles. Jr.. 414 Swan Circle. Elsmere, DI 1-9740, 

DI 1-7850 
Polly, Rex. 337 Hazard Road. Whitesburg. 2597 
Polston, Billy D., Columbia, Burkesville. 202, 122 
Prall, John A.. Eastern Ky. State College. Richmond. 623-9800 
Prather. Wilbur E.. 1512 Berry Blvd.. Louisville, EM 3-2908, 

JU 6-5807 
Preece, Boyce, Box 544, Kermit, W. Va. 
Price, Charles, Meally, 789-3907, Ashland 324-3177 
Prichard, Glen, Crum, W. Va. 
Prior, Lowell F.. 1722 Highland Ave.. Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-0700, EL 3-6129 
Pruden, Jim, 3739 Kipling, Dr.. Owensboro. MU 4-4469, MU 

3-4555 
Randall, H. C. DDS. Box 227. Columbia, 384-2851, 384-2843 
Bainey. Jimmy, 16 Phillips Ct.. Winchester. PL 4-2948 PL 

4-2818 
Rains, Richard, 2328 Alden Court, Covington 
Randolph, Don M., 6310 Sheila Rd.. Louisville, 969-6359, 969- 

5145 
Rapier, Burl, 7201 Briscoe Lane, Louisville, 239-8661 
Rapp, Bill, 215 Heplar, Ironton. Ohio. 532-1983, 532-7242 
Kawlings, Harold, 182 E. Park. Radcliff. EL 1-3249, Ft. Knox 

4-3277 
Reed, Charles R., 102 Elizabeth, Versailles, TR 3-4213, TR 3-4221 
Reed, Gordon "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas. HI 

1-4946. KI 1-4607. LI 2-4607 
Reed, William F.. 329 Mentelle Park. Lexington, 6-4768. 2-436S 
Reinhardt, Myron Stanley, 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. 

Thomas, HI 1-3730. MY 7-9731 
Renfroe, John E., Box 298. Williamsburg. 6488. 2721 
Resehar, John V.. 6618 Pico Lane. Louisville. WO 9-3885, 

WE 7-2300 
Rexroat, Jerry L.. 204 West Main, Lebanon Junction, TE 3-4446 
Rhatigan. Alfred J.. 10663 Chelmsford Rd.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

PR 1-2479, EL 1-6400 ext. 7 
Rice, Willard S.. 304 South 4th St.. Murray 
Richards. Dallas R.. 55 Valley View Ct.. New Albany, Indiana, 

WH 4-1730, WH 4-8471 
Rickard, Bob, Bremen, 526-3654, 625-3411 

Rickman, Murrell, Box 265, College Station, Murray, PL 3-4999 
Riffe, James. No. 7 15th St.. Newport. JU 1-2287, AX 1-4811 
Riggins, Jason. Box 2691, Williamson, W. Va. 
Ring, William H.. HQS.. 4th TRS. Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri, 

Empire 8-7121 ext. 641 (Bus.) 
Rison. Johnny B.. 197 3rd St., Revenna, 723-2852, 723-2515 
Ritter, Goebel. 104 Wooton St., Hazard, GE 6-2453, GE 6-3711 
Rivlin, Jule, Marshall University, Huntington, W. Va. 
Roberts. Donald G., 690 Fairview Ct.. Harrodsburg. 734-2887, 

734-3673 
Roberts. Ray M.. 1107 Main St.. Box 381. Murray, PL 3-3924 
Robinson, Don, 19061,4 Walnut St.. Kenova, W. Va. 
Robinson, George W.. 215 Arlington Ave.. Lexington. 2-1882 
Robinson, Pearl, 214Vi Maple St., Manchester 
Rodgers, David G., 102 Ohio Lane. London. VO 4-5185 (Bus.) 
Roeckers. Bernard. 803 Loda. Cincinnati 45. Ohio. PL 2-1140, 

TE 1-6103 
Rogers. Eugene F., Jr., Route 2, Fredonia, 2671 
Rogers, Howard, 17 Maryland Ave.. Winchester, PL 4-1785, 

Lexington 2-2220 ext. 4208 
Roller, Otis C. 808 Chamberry Dr.. Louisville 7, TW 5-6356, 

JU 7-1121 ext. 309 
Rolph, Harold J.. 915 South 7th St.. Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-4036, 

JE 2-3231 
Rose, Ronald Coalgood 

Ross, J. Russell. Beaver Dam. BR 4-4776. BR 4-3251 
Roudebush. Jack. Main St.. Hartford. CY 8-3986. CY 8-3986 
Rouse, Clyde L., 520 Erlanger Road. Erlanger, DI 1-6943, 

DI 1-7737 
Ronth, William E.. 603 South 21st St.. Middlesboro. 1504. 1504 
Roy, Charles D.. 2629 N. Red Bank Road. Evansville. Indiana, 

HA 3-4664. HA 5-5552 
Rubarts, Leland G.. Dunnville. 787-5099. 787-5094 
Russell. Allen. 1603 Sycamore. Murray. PL 3-2832 
Russell, Eugene "Eudy", 1106 Gallia St.. Portsmouth. Ohio. 

EL 3-7653. EL 3-2103 
Rutledge. Marvin L., 733 E. Main St.. Frankfort, CA 3-0295, 

CA 7-6611 
Salyer, Gobel, Elkhorn City 

Sams, Glenn, 119 Maple Ave.. Auburn. LI 2-7662 
Sanders, J. G.. Route 5. Mayfield. CH 7-6269 
Sanders, Jack E.. Route 2. Cobb, Cadiz LA 2-8863 
Sanders. Mel. 3910 Sunset Ave.. Paducah. 442-3650 
Schad. James. 10717 Chelmsford. Cincinnati. Ohio. PR 1-5495 
Schaffer. Gary R.. 1506 Oleanda Ave.. Louisville 15, EM 6-8645, 

WA 1-9230 
Scharfenberger. Irv T.. 7267 Jethve Lane, Cincinnati 43, Ohio, 

LO 1-6378, LO 1-6378 
Scheben, W. J.. Erlanger 
Schlich, Paul E.. 3316 Dean Dr.. Louisville, GL 8-6765, TW 

6-0211 
Schmidt, Donald Henry, Travelers Insurance Co., 12th Floor- 
Coast Line Bldg.. Jacksonville. Florida, TW 3-3742, 
JU 4-4221 
Sehnebelt, Carl R.. Hanover. Indiana, UN 6-3581, UN 6-4561 
Schneider. Robert. 62 Woodlawn, So. Fort Mitchell, HI 1-1700, 
ED 1-1868 



Pagre Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1961 



Attention K.H.S.A.A. OFFICIALS! 

THERE IS STILL TIME TO PUCHASE 

THE SPECIAL COVERAGE 

AVAILABLE TO YOU 

WHY TAKE A CHANCE? 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^Ae KUufden Go4nfijaH4f> 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 2-8522 



Scott, Emmanuel H.. 1614 Potter PI., Cincinnati, Ohio, AV 

1-6928, MU 1-6150 
Scott. Luther, 211 Spruce St., Murray, PL 3-4649 
Sebestin, John, Omar, W. Va. 
Seibert, Billy Ray, 301 Mineral St., Dawson Springs, SW 7-2280, 

SW 7-2280 
Sellman, John B., 4031 Oilman Ave., Louisville 7, TW 7-2757, 

JU 6-3393 
Selvy, Curt, 108 17th St., Corbin, 2422, 2270-W 
Settle, Evan, 102 Alton Rd., Shelbyville, ME 3-1847, ME 3-4869 
Settle, Roy G., 1413 St. Mary's Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-2136, 

MU 3-3571 
Sexton, William L., 324 4th Ave., Dayton, HE 1-5941, MA 

1-4321 
Shackelford, Roscoe, 612 Maple, Hazard, GE 6-3467, GE 6-3711 
Shanks, Thomas E., 3210 Ainslie Way, Louisville, GL 2-9513, 

JU 4-1361 ext. 473 
Shaver, Roy A., Bremen, 525-3493, 525-3551 
Shaw, Earl, Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-2208 
Sherman, Jerry, 502 Prichard St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Sherrow, Curtis, Route 1, Bondville, Harrodsburg 266-4252 
Sherrow, Winston G., Bo.x 214, Beattyville, IN 4-2553 
Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Dr., Clarksville, Tenn. 

MI 7-4112, Ft. Campbell, ext. 3320 
Shope, Lowell M.. 1379 Mittendorf, South Webster, Ohio, PR 

8-2425, BL 9-5501 
Showalter, John, 116 Military, Georgetown, 662, 1240 
Shumate, Robert, 332 Emerson, Latonia, HE 1-7672, DU 1-7000, 

ext. 816 or 560 
Siler, Clarence M., 202 South 8th St., Williamsburg, 6188 
Simms, Wavelan J., Jr., 177 Howell St., Providence, R. I., 

EL 1-6711 (Bus.) 
Simpson, Fred C, 719'/' 13th St., Ashland, 324-0655 
Singleton, Vesper, Carr Creek, MI 2-3917, MI 2-3833 
Slucher, Kenneth W., Box 42, Simpsonville, PA 2-5231, PA 

2-5120 
Smith, David W., 8107 Rory Way, Louisville 19, 969-0060, 

SP 6-4621 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmvic 

EM 6-8745 
Smith, Eurie H., Jr., 3730 Taylorsville Rd., Ixiuisville, GL 

4-0374, GL 4-0374 
Smith, Thomas E., 11 Polster Dr 

7-3302, HA 2-9174 



WE 



Louis 



18, GL 8-1286. 



Indii 



GR 



Smith, Wayne N. 

Smith, Willard N. 

Sosh, LaRue, Third St., Uniontown, 100, 35 

Sosh, Nelson, Third St.. Uniontown, 123, 35 

Spahr, David L., 121 Berger Rd., Paducah, 443-7260 

Spencer. Irvin E., 10414 Sunlight Way, Valley Station, 

7-7855, WE 7-2300 
Spiceland, S. E., 305 South 13th St., Murray, 753-2811 
Spurlock. Ralph. Cawood, 2061-W 

Stacy. Richie M.. 189 Park Hill Blvd.. West Liberty, SH 3-4742 
Stanfill, Robert S., Route 3, Louisa, ME 8-4014, Ashland 324- 

1111 ext. 529 
Stearns, John, Box 218, Monticello, FI 8-2743 
Steenken, William R., 1636 Highland, Covington, ED 1-3789, 

HE 1-3108 
Stephens, Robert J., Box 527, Charlton Heights, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry S., 2210 Circle Dr., Lexington, 4-9620, 4-2431 
Stephenson, Tommy H., Route 8. Paducah, 898-3136 
Stepp, Lewis J., Route 1, Box 99, Kermit, W. Va. 
Steward, Herbert T., 330 Maple St., Hazard, 6-2438 
Stethen, James E., Stone St., Box 134, Bedford. 255-3285, 1150 
Stiff, Maurice, 2150 Glenworth, Louisville, 454-7808. JU 5-2295 
Stikeleather. Clyde L., 201 Goff Dr., Leitchfield, S92-R, 104 
Stinson, Charles L., Maple St., Horse Cave, ST 6-2711, ST 6-7131 
Straub, Charles. 930 East 2nd St.. Maysville. LO 4-6096. LO 

4-3781 
Strong. Arnett. Kentucky Blvd.. Hazard, GE 6-3938, GE 6-2141 
Suffill, Bob, Drakesboro, GR 6-2939 
Sugg, Johnnie D., Route 6, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4798, TU 6-4431 

ext. 348 
Sullivan, Don C, 3020 Dartmouth Dr., 

Frankfort CA 3-8221 ext. 61 
Swinford, John M., 440 Pike St., Cynthians 
Switzer, Richard J., Jr., 1628 Banklick, Co 

CH 1-1090 
Tackett, Harold, Box 58, Olive Hill 

Tackett, Jay, Route 3, Georgetown. Stamping Ground 832-6653 
Taylor, Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, Murray. PL 3-4825, PL 3-5125 
Taylor, Robert S., 4209 Hewitt, Louisville, GL 8-4293, ME 4- 

1581 
Thoma, M. L., 116 Holly, Berea, 986-4702 
Thomas, Charles, 410 East Drive, Fulton, 1948, 665 

(Continued in November ATHLETE) 



Lexington, 7-6953, 



Sutdif f e Hasi The 
Sifreaters and Jackets 

CLASS AND HONOR SWEATERS 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service, 10-Day Delivery 




V-NECK SWEATERS 

No. 1030 — A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $ 1 2.45 

No. 58V-W — Another Sand sweater in solid white. Choice 
of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular as athletic 
awards. White only; each._ _ $9.15 

No. 6V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold. 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each $9.75 

Reversible Honor Jackets 

Write us for our Catalog with 

Special School Prices 



COAT SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $13.65 

No. 530 J — A companion sweater to the 58-W. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each $1 1.50 

No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — iOOy„ pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold. White. Maroon. 
Purple; each $10.65 



LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.35; 8" letters $2.05; chenille bars, 40c each; 
chenille chevrons, 45c; name plates. 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and requires three weeks for delivery. 

The SUTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



Basketball Season Is Here 

In Stock for Immediate Delivery 
NO. AFR BASKETBALLS 

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erior shot control .... uniform dribble .... 
uniform backboard rebound. Finest quality 
deep pebbled grain cowhide leather. Wider 
channel seams for better finger tip control. 
This ball bears the signature of Coach Adolph 
Rupp of the University of Kentucky and is 
used by the Kentucky Wildcats Basketball 
Team. Try one. 




THE PRICE IS 

$22.95 



INTRODUCING OUR NEW NO. ARX OFFICIAL COACH ADOLPH RUPP 
BASKETBALL OFFICIAL LAST BILT 

We have in stock for the 1931-62 basketball season the new ARX basketball with Coach Adolph njt 
Rupp's signature. 

Best Because . . . 

* deep grained pebbled surface provides good grip and shot control 

* approved orange color makes the ball easily visible 

* GRIP-GUARD prolongs the original finish of the top grade leather cover 

* continuous channel seams assure firm g^rip and better finger-tip control 

* the "ARX" basketball is top quality throughout — the finest basketball on the courts 
today. Official in size and weight. 

THE PRICE — $22.95 



By the way, how's your stock on scorebooks, sweat socks, practice pants, practice jerseys, first- 
aid supplies and other items necessary to start your basketball season? 

REMEMBER OUR MOTTO: ''We Ship the Day You Buy" 

Each and every order for any type of merchandise, whether special-made or out of stock, gets 
the personal attention of every person in our store. If you would like to see our salesman for either 
basketball or football supplies, just call us at CHapel 7-1941 or CHapel 7-1942. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




Hiqh School AthMe 




The 1961 K.H.S.A.A. Football Championships mark the end of another fine 
season. The playoffs, since their inauguration, have given great impetus to high 
school football. Champions in Classes A and AA will be named on Thanksgiving 
Day, and in Class AAA a week earlier. 



Omcial Organ oi the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
NOVEMBER - ISBl 




Some Reflections On Sport 
As An Element Of The Culture 

Editor's Note: The following talk was given by 
President Arthur S. Daniels, A.A.H.P.E.R., before one 
of the sessions of the 1961 National Federation 
Annual Meetings. 

I would like to have you view sport with me a 
little differently during my brief moment on this 
platform. We will forego the workaday world of sports 
administration with its problems of schedules, of- 
ficials, budgets, violations, clinics, and insurance pro- 
grams. Instead, we will briefly look at sport as an 
element of the culture; sport in the history of man- 
kind; in society; in education. 

My approach to the topic will not be as a critic 
of sports. I believe, however, that criticism of sport 
in om- schools may be reduced in two major ways. 
The first is more effective control of malpractices. 
Malpractices are not peculiar to sport. The same 
problem exists in society in general and in such highly 
respected professions as law and medicine. The sec- 
ond means of reducing criticism is developing under- 
standing and appreciation of sport as a part of the 
culture and according it a proper place in our hier- 
archy of values in education and in society. 

Sport is an element of the culture like the other 
components of music, art, science, literature, language 
and education. With few exceptions, sport has been 
a significant part of each culture from earliest times. 
It has always been, and is today, a strong social force 
in human relations. Skillful human movement in 
friendly competition is a basic form of expression 
invoking strong responses from both participants 
and spectators. 

Sports and physical education link scientific, 
artistic and ethical and moral aspects of life. The 
scientific foundations of sport include: anatomy, 
physiology, kinesiology, biology, cultural anthropology, 
sports medicine, and the behavioral sciences of psy- 
chology, sociology and social psychology. Historically, 
sport has been a favorite literary subject. It has 
been richly treated through the art forms of music, 
painting, sculpture, the dance, and architecture. Sport 
has also been the source of motivation for the finest 
kind of human relationships in all walks of life 
through its concepts of fairness, observance of rules 
and consideration of the rights of others. 

Despite this evidence that sport is a basic element 
of the culture, we have failed to exploit its historical 
and social significance. David Riesman, eminent so- 
cial scientist, in a letter to me wrote, "For some 
strange reason, students of society and social life 
have missed almost completely the importance of 
sport in their investigations, while those who teach 
and guide sport have omitted the relevance of so- 
ciology and social psychology." 

When our people team up with the social scientists 
the day will come when we will no longer have to de- 
fend sports as a proper school activity. Furthermore, 
this teamwork will result in better understanding of 
our sports problems and provide scientific bases for 
their solutions. 

Sports in History 

Sports have long been a part of man's effort to 
do the things he thought necessary for survival and 
well being. With primitive man, survival was a 
matter of physical efficiency. Life expectancy was 
related to his ability to fight off enemies and procure 
food. Membership in a group increased the survival 
potential. From this group membership there were 



developed games, dances and other folkways. 

In early civilized cultures, sports were part of 
total living. In early Egypt, swimming, wrestling, and 
gymnastic games were popular. Warriors supple- 
mented military skills with sports and games even 
as we did in World War II. 

In ancient China (112-229 B. C.) football, bo.xing 
and jiujitsu were most popular. 

In Persia (Iran) (558-331 B. C.) sports were used 
in preparing youth for war. The Spartan Greeks also 
used sports to develop soldiers, while the Athenian 
Greeks viewed sports as contributing to the develop- 
ment of an all-around person who could serve the 
state in peace or war. The Romans used sports like 
the Persians and Spartan Greeks — for the develop- 
ment of soldiers. 

Physical education and sports aimed at producing 
military strength did not disappear with these early 
societies. Germany, Italy, Japan, and Russia followed 
the same practice as they shaped up their military 
plans. Even the democratic countries like France, 
England, Sweden, Denmark and the United States 
have slanted their sports and physical education pro- 
grams toward military ends when necessary. 

Sport in Contemporary American Life 

A little over a hundred years ago, athletics were 
virtually unknown in America. Athletics, as we know 
them today, had their origins in the last half of the 
Nineteenth Century. Their full development occurred 
in this century, with spectacular advances made in 
the 1920's, the first golden age of sports in this 
country. 

Sports developed in harmony with the fundamental 
folkways of our people. The games that became 
most popular were really indigenous. Basketball was 
invented here and baseball and football had a deve- 
lopment unique to this country. All sports, however, 
found a fertile ground for development here because 
they are compatible to our way of life. Today the 
social well-being resulting from participation in 
sports is recognized by leaders in medicine, education, 
the Church, and all levels of government. 

Other evidence of the popularity of sport is all 
around us. Consistently, the largest crowds in America 
are sports crowds. In a span of nine weeks, some 
university football home games will draw upwards to 
84,000 on six separate Saturdays. No other activity 
the university could sponsor can draw crowds like 
this. And, scientifically, no one really knows why. 
The amount of space and time given to coverage of 
sports by newspapers, periodicals, books, radio and 
television further attests to the popularity of sports. 

Another measure of the status of sports is the 
relationships noted with other elements of the cul- 
ture. The leisure and recreation market today is one 
of the largest in our entire economy. In 1950, one 
sport alone (college football) had a gate of 103 
million, suggesting a capital investment of around 
250 million. 

In World War II, the United States used sports 
and games in three ways to meet military and survival 
needs: during the basic training period, to develop 
fitness and the will to win; in the combat theaters, 
to maintain fitness and morale; and toward the end 
of the war, as part of the convalescent and rehabilit- 
ation program. 

The attitude of the church toward sports parallels 
the general cultural transition from the Puritan Ideal 
(of no play) to the permissive and supporting posi- 
tion noted today. All levels of government are actively 
involved in supporting sports and recreation. The 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XXIV— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1961 



$1.00 Per Year 



Behavior on the Bench 

Executive Secretary Clifford B. Fagan 
of the National Federation forwarded to the 
State Office of the K.H.S.A.A. recently a 
bulletin which had been issued by Chairman 
H. E. Foster of the National Basketball 
Committee relative to the bench behavior 
of coaches. Mr. Fagan stated that the Nation- 
al Basketball Committee of the United States 
and Canada is most interested in securing 
from basketball coaches the best possible be- 
havior during basketball games, and that the 
Committee has placed special emphasis for 
the 1961-62 season on the matter of good 
coaches' conduct. 

Mr. Faigan says: "The National Basket- 
ball Committee earnestly solicits the support 
and cooperation of State Associations in this 
campaign to establish the best possible con- 
duct on the part of basketball coaches." The 
Commissioner and the Board of Control are 
glad to give special emphasis to this project, 
not only as it affects the sport of basketball 
but as it applies to coaches of all the sports 
sponsored by the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association." 

Chairman Foster, in his bulletin directed 
to all associations and conferences, says : 

"As Chairman of the N.C.A.A. Basketball 
Committee as well as the National Basket- 
ball Rules Committee, I've been instructed 
to write you in an effort to improve bench 
behavior of the coaches in your conference. 
It is felt by these committees that coaches' 
behavior during basketball games in certain 
areas has been shameful and a far cry from 
the conduct expected by the Basketball Rules 
Book. It is felt that continual protests 
against calls and unsportsmanlike behavior 
does much to incite the crowds, which brings 
about conditions that the game could do well 
without. In the 1961 N.C.A.A. Basketball 
Finals, the Coaches were charted as to be- 
havior, and the worst offender was on his 
feet twenty two times during the game. 

"It is believed that many of our more ac- 
tive coaches have lost sight of the Basketball 
Coaches Creed, that has been the Motto for 
many years of the National Basketball 
Coaches Association. In the hope that you 



are interested in this problem, I am enclos- 
ing a copy of this creed to be used as you see 
fit. 

"You will note when the 1962 Basketball 
Rule Book comes out, that this problem has 
been met in several ways. Such items that 
heretofore were considered coaching from 
the side lines have been removed, and a 
coach may signal to his team for a timeout or 
give encouragement and may communicate 
with them from the bench. However, in the 
Comments the Rules Committee has strength- 
ened its stand against showing disrespect to 
the officials either vocally or by side line 
antics. Other than normal coaching behavior 
should result in the officials charging the 
proper penalty. 

"If you feel your conference has a prob- 
lem in this respect, the Basketball Committee 
feels it would be helpful if your office would 
channel your feelings through your memVjer 
school Athletic Directors, and through them 
to the Coaches. There is much need for im- 
provement and with the whole countiy push- 
ing in the same direction, I'm sure basket- 
ball will be a better game." 

Mr. Fagan enclosed with the bulletin 
from Chairman Foster a copy of the Basket- 
ball Coaches' Creed, written for the National 
Association of Basketball Coaches by George 
R. Edwards, University of Missouri. The 
creed, which appears in the basketball rules 
book, might well be a code of ethics for any 
person who carries the title of coach. It is 
well worth reprinting. 

Basketball Coaches' Creed 

I BELIEVE that basketball has an im- 
portant place in the general education 
scheme and pledge myself to co-operate with 
others in the field of education to so admin- 
ister it that its value never will be question- 
ed. 

I BELIEVE that other coaches of this 
sport are as earnest in its protection as I am, 
and I will do all in my power to further their 
endeavors. 

I BELIEVE that my own actions should 
be so regulated at all times that I will be a 
credit to the profession. 

I BELIEVE that the members of the 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



NOVEMBER, 1961 



VOL. XXIV— NO. 4 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62). Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63). Georgetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville: Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63), Browder : Preston Holland (1961-65). Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Gran C. Teater (1960- 
64), Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates Jl.OO Per Year 

^>iom the Commissioned s Office 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1961 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination will be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 4, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 
"certified" ratings. Officials registered with 
the K. H. S. A. A. for the first time this year 
and who have not been registered previously 
in any other state association, are not eligible 
to take the test. Those interested should ad- 
vise the State Office immediately in order 
that necessary arrangements can be made 
with the school administrators who will 
supervise the taking of the exam. Officials 
living in Kentucky need not suggest the 
name of an examiner. The "approved" rating 
does not carry forward from year to year, 
but must be earned each year. After an of- 
ficial has received the "certified" rating, he 
keeps this rating by attending clinics with- 
out having to continue to take the exam 
each year. 

Rules Changes in Swimming 

The following changes in the rules will be 
in effect for intersoholastic swimming dur- 
ing 1961-62: 

1. Rule 1, Section 3— The 400-yard Free- 
style has been added as first event in dual 
meet program. 

2. Rule III, Section l-c-5 — A contestant 
or relay team disqualified under the False 
Start Rule is not required to swim the event 
concerned. 

3. Rule III, Section 10-b — Any contestant 
or relay team shall be disqualified if a team- 
mate enters the water before all other con- 



testants have finished the event. 

4. Rule V, Section 2-d — Referee is requir- 
ed to audit carefully all tabulations and re- 
sults as recorded by the Official Scorer at 
conclusion of last event and he shall certify 
this by signing his name to the official score 
sheet if it is found to be correct, thus estab- 
lishing the official score. Subsequent to this, 
no corrections or changes may be made even 
though an error is discovered later. 

5. Rule V, Section 4-a — A fourth place 
finish judge is not required for dual meets. 

6. Rule X, Section 5 — 1st Sentence: sub- 
stitute "other" for "optional". After "dives", 
delete "from five groups" and substitute 
"comma one from each of the five groups." 

7. Rule XI, Section 1-j — When a contest- 
ant has failed a dive and is requested by the 
Diving Referee to repeat the dive, the con- 
testant must do so at once. 

8. Rule XII, Section 1-c — Each Diving 
Judge now, rather than the Referee, shall 
deduct 2 points from a contestant's award 
for executing a dive when the diver takes 
less than 3 steps in making his forward 
approach. 

9. Rule XII, Section 1-d — It is now per- 
missible for all dives with forward take-off 
to be performed either standing or with for- 
ward approach at the option of the diver. A 
prior declaration of a forward standing take- 
off is required. 

10. Rule XII, Section 1-h— This section 
has been extensively reworded to define 
what is meant by "free position" in perform- 
ing a dive. Below follows an explanation of 
what is meant by "free position" and it has 
been approved by the National Swimming 
Rules Committee. 

"The free position as listed in the 1962 
Guide is not a new method of performing a 
dive. It is merely a recognition of a present 
practice. For instance, dive No. 526 is listed 
in the 1961 Guide as performed in the pike 
position although it cannot be done entirely 
in that position. Actually a combination of 
pike and layout is used. To recognize this 
situation, this dive will, in the future, be list- 
ed in the free position, thus legalizing the 
present technique." 

11. Diving Table — This has been com- 
pletely revised and it now includes new dives 
and changes in degree of difficulty ratings. 
Also a fourth column has been added listing 
the degree of difficulty ratings for dives per- 
formed in the Free Position such as columns 
one, two and three presently do for the Tuck, 
Pike and Layout positions, respectively. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



Page Three 



New Secretary 
Dr. John Heldman, Head of the Physical 
Education Department at the University of 
Louisville, is the new secretary of the Louis- 
ville Basketball Officials Association, suc- 
ceeding Dave Longenecker who resigned 
recently. Dr. Heldman will be one of the two 
employment bureau heads in Region 7. Offic- 
ials who have been filing their schedules and 
open dates with Mr. Longenecker should now 
file this information with Dr. Heldman. His 
address is 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville. His 
office phone number is ME 7-2531, exten- 
sion 275. The number of his home phone 
is EM 3-2181. 

Fort Knox Association 

Pres. W. H. Roettger of the Fort Knox 
Officials Association has written the follow- 
ing letter to the Commissioner concerning 
his organization: 

"As you are aware, last year we oi-ganized 
the Fort Knox Officials Association. I should 
like to report that our first season has been 
a most sudcessful one. We were booked for a 
total of 30 g'ames utilizing approximately 110 
officials for this season. At the present time 
our organization has 20 officials, some of 
whom are also approved and certified by 
your association. Our members are not en- 
tirely military personnel, but also consist of 
officials who reside in the surrounding 
communities and Louisville. We are willing 
to contract for games within a 100 mile 
radius of Fort Knox, and if anyone is inter- 
ested, please contact the undersigned or our 
booking agent, Mr. S. M. Matarazzo, 320 N. 
Mulberry Street, Elizabethtown, Kentucky, 
phone Rockwell 5-5689." 

Commemorative Basketball Stamps 

Executive Secretary Clifford B. Fagan 
of the National Federation writes that tihe 
United States Post Office Department is 
issuing on November 6, 1961, a itj- Com- 
memorative Stamp honoring the sport of 
basketball. The date marks the 70th Anni- 
versary of the game and the 100th Anni- 
versary of the birth of its inventor, Dr. 
James Naismith. 

The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall 
of Fame is issuing the official two-colored 
cover on permanent cotton-fibre paper de- 
picting basketball and its founder in the Hall 
of Fame. The Hall of Fame is presently under 
construction on tJhe campus of its birthplace, 
Springfield College, Springfield, Massachu- 
setts. All proceeds from the sale of covers 
will go to the Naismith Hall of Fame. Covers 
can be ordered from: Basketball Hall of 
Fame, Springfield College, Springfield, Mass. 



Singles are 25?! each and Place No. Blocks — 
$1.00 each. 

Undoubtedly many stamp collecting clubs 
will welcome this news and make purchases. 
In addition to providing an interesting item 
for stamp collectors, the arrangement will 
provide a means of substantial income for 
the Hall of Fame. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Barnett, Willis E., Jr., 2208 W. Chestnut, Louisville, SP 8-762G 

Baskin, Sylvester, 214 West 2nd St., Lynch, 848-5637 

Beyerle, Joseph M., 5731 Fourson Dr., Cincinnati 38. Ohio, 

WI 1-2235, WI 1-2235 
Blackburn, Adrian, 413 Scott Court, Prestonsburg 
Bond, Jack C 2057 Clay's Mill Road, Lexington, 7-2351, 2-2260 

Ext. 2789 
Burke. Harry R., Francis St., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, TU 

6-2385 
Combs. Travis, 1208 Old Cannons Lane, Louisville 
Cotton, James L., 337 North Hall, Western Ky. St. Col., 

Bowling Green, VA 7-1043 
Coulter, William, 807 Taylor Ave., Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-7510, HA 4-8268 
Craig, Randy. 446 Elm Street, Ludlow, AX 1-7948, GR 1-5545 
Davis. Charlie, Loyall 

Duncan, James T., Route 2, Russellville, PA 6-2802 
Ferguson, Thomas L., Bailey Street, North Kenova, Ohio 
Ford, Sid M., 112 Lee St., Bowling Green, 843-3651 
Gillespie, Robert C, 8 Wilana Court, Pikeville, 7-7934, 7-7190 
Heitzman, Warren E., 7291 Memory Lane, Cincinnati 39, Ohio 
Hurley, Kenneth E., 2840 Kentucky Ave., Padncah, 442-0631, 

443-4561 
Jones, Jimmy H., Box 221, Millstone 

Knight. James A., Box No. 1, Morehead State College, More- 
head. ST 4-5900 
Lotz, Robert W., 2149 Sherwood. Louisville, GL 1-0549, ME 

4-9491 
McGuire, Jack, 229 North 17th St., Louisville 3, JU 7-0400 
McNabb. Edgar, 16 Beechwood Road, So. Ft. Mitchell ED 

1-3113, ED 1-1220 
Nicholson, J. Ken, 2904 Jackson St., Evansville 14 Indiana 

GR 6-3400, GR 7-5075 
Noble, Clarence Arnett, Box 523, Morehead St. Col., Morehead, 

GE 6-4630, ST 4-5471 
Osborne, Kenneth, Apt. 1, Holbrook Way, Morehead 
Rivlin, Jule, Marshall University, Huntington, W Va 
Schellhase, Dave. 1614 Keck St., Evansville, Indiana, HA 5-9790 
Shaw, Earl, Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-2208 
Stambaugh, Robert A., 811 South Alves St., Henderson VA 

6-9657, VA 7-3511 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first nnmbeer is that of the home 
phone. 

Adams. Donald K., 222 West Hickman St., Winchester 

Adams. Troy E.. Box 51, Simpsonville, PA 2-5220. ME 3-2375 

Allen, Harry G.. Box 551, Martin, BU 5-3219 

Ayres, Henry, 6 Reynolds Village, Owensboro 

Back, Bill, Jeff, 6-2500 (Bus.) 

Ballard, Shirley, Snowfall Drive, Winchester, PL 4-5344 PL 

4-4812 
Barker, Bob R., 610 Middletown Ave., Ashland, 324-5360 324- 

9646 
Beasley, Amon E., Murray State College, Murray 
Bell, Henry B., 110-F Thomas St., Lexington, 2-5861, 6-6441 
Berry, William, 1633 Jackson Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6764 
Beyerle, Joseph M.. 6731 Fourson Dr., Cincinnati 38 Ohio 

WI 1-2235, WI 1-2235 
Blankenship, Zeb, Route 5, Harrodsburg, 734-3153, 734-4195 
Blevins, Howard R., 206 South Trailor Court, Ft. Enox, 4-6537 

(Bus. I 
Bliffen, Jerry H., Knifley 
Boone, Winton E., Vets Village, Bowling Green. VI 2-7206 

VI 2-7206 
Bowlin, Bob, Emiyn 

Boyles, Paul E., Russell, 836-5497, 836-3141 Ext. 276 
Branaman. Bill, Jr., 203 Goodwin St. Corbin, 2594, 504 
Branham, Curtis, Jr., Zebulon, GE 7-4814 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



Breeder., Charles W., Mt. Washington, 538-4897, ,TW 5-4465 
Browder, Homer Lee, Sr., 147 Maple St., Henderson, VA 6-2123. 

VA 7-1838 
Brown, James W., 102 Bristol Drive. Richmond, 623-2276, 623- 

4220 
Bruner. John Lee, Jr., 133 Mahan Ave.. London, VO 4-2476 
Bull, Wendell, Special Service, Ft. Knox, 4-1255 
Burdette, Wally M., 1514 Oleanda Ave., Louisville 15. EM 

6-5559 
Burke. Harry R., Prestonsburg 

Campbell. John, Jr., Garrett, ED 8-3061, ED 8-3461 
Cai-penter. Leonard F.. Sublett, FI 9-3403 

Carter, Donald R.. 512 Mantle N., Elizabethtown, 4-1255 (Bus.) 
Carter, Robert. Georgetown, Indiana. 127-12 
Castle. Jack T.. 315 Second St.. Pikeville. GE 7-4367 
Gates. Tommy. 783 Plainview Drive, Madisonville, 821-1821 
Chandler, Roger A., Eastview. Shelbyville, ME 3-3662 
Chaney, Rex, 304 West Sun, Morehead, ST 4-5993, ST 4-4181 

Ext. 60 
Chattin. Charles. 2325 Harrod St.. Ashland, 324-5385, 324-9226 
Choate. Glen. 402 North 2nd St., Hickman 
Clarke, Lt. Edward F., 5485-F Jamison St., Van Voorhis-Fort 

Click. Bobby Joe. Manton. BU 5-3067, BU 5-3014 

Combs, Travis, 1208 Old Cannons Lane, Louisville 

Conley, Oi-ville D., Oil Springs 

Conley, Ted L.. 4725 Nottingham Court, Ashland 

Conley. Tom W.. Route 23. Paintsville, CY 7-3725 

Conn, .Tohn D., 4100 Pixley Way, Louisville 

Conner, Floyd, 1022 High St., Bowling Green, 843-4464, VI 

3-6516 
Cox, Charles Glenn, 3266 Morgan, Morganfield, 160 
Coyle, Ernest T., 2131 Coburn Blvd., Lexington, 6-5655. 2-2270 
Craig, John G.. Box 54, Rochester. 934-2712 
Crawford, Donald Ray, North Main St., Nicholasville. 5-5232, 

5-4751 
Gulp, Ronald D.. 209 Prospect. Bellevue. CO 1-7834 
Cummins, Curtis, 289 Hemlock, Benham, 848-2546 
Davis, Curtis, 1119 East Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959, JU 

2-3511 
Davis, Don, 69 Linden, Ft. Thomas, 441-8909, CO 1-2980 
Davis, Ronnie, 131 East Arch St., Madisonville, TA 1-6007 
Dawson. Ray, Stearns 
DeMoisey, J. Fox, 227 Highland Ave.. Ft. Thomas, HI 1-0795. 

HI 1-0795 
Dempsey, Robert H.. 331 McDonald Dr., Versailles, TR 3-4728 
Derrick. Charles A., No. 3 Adrian Court, Newport, JU 1-7301. 

PA 1-1055 
Divine, Wayne, Route 1, Bremen, Central City 988-M2 
Drahman. Thomas W.. 116 8th Ave., Dayton, HE 1-1203 
Driver, Bobby, Route 4, Glasgow 
Dunavent, Rondel, Route 4, Owenton 
Dunaway, Adrian, Route 1, Sharpsburg 
Duncan, Earl S.. 10,007 Taylorsville Road, Jeffersontown. AN 

7-1478, TW 5-0569 
Edgington. Fred, 208 9th Street, Manchester, Ohio, 549-2103 
Edwards, Glenn, Salyersville ■ 
Ensslin, Charles W., 716 North Main St., Barbourville. 6-3276 

6-3019 
Figg. Charles Raymond. 1008 Navaho, Frankfort. CA 7-2146 

CA 3-0565 
Einley. Sam, 4531 Oak Dr.. Louisville, 368-7390, JU 2-8252 
Ford, Sid M.. 112 Lee, Bowling Green, 843-3651 
Foster, William R. (Bob). Science Hill, 423-8683. 678-8161 
Francis, George, Sassafras, GE 6-3436 

Freeman, John W., 1126 East Main St.. Richmond, 623-1783 
Fyffe, Robert, Red Bird Mission, Beverly, Pineville 7-3501 (Bus.) 
■Gabbard, John B.. 320 N. Hill St., London, VO 4-5915, VO 

4-2863 
Gaither, Jack. Rockport, BR 4-4357, BR 4-4357 
■Gamlin, Fred J., Route 1. Puryear, Tenn., 247-3335 
Geiser, Robert, 6532 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati 30, Ohio BE 

1-8564, BE 1-5046 
Gillespie, Robert C. 8 Wilana Coui-t, Pikeville, 7-7934 7-7190 
Giordano. Al. 107 Ratliff. Princeton, 5-5680, 5-5615 
Goff, Reathel, Memorial School, Hardyville 
Coins, Herman, Box 17, Gatliff Rt.. Williamsburg 
Goldey, William H„ 537 North Main St., Henderson. 7-3622. 

6-4822 
<3over, Robert J.. 1714 Glendale Ave., Bowling Green VI 2-3306 

VI 3-3247 
Graham, Jim. 3227 Short St., Ashland, 4-8169 
Griffith, Edwin Dale, 1134 Sexton Court, Ashland, 324-2497, 

324-1155 Ext. 495 
Haap, Virgil. 6885 Memory Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Haines, William E.. Box 577, Morehead 
Halcomb. Ralph W., Main St., Box 131, Livingston. 463-2641, 

453-3051 
Hamm, Harold D., Route 1, Frankfort. 227-9800 
Handlan. Raymond L.. 44S-A Boone Trail, Danville. 236-5837. 

236-5211 Ext. 8 
Hansel, Earl Dean, Crummies, Harlan 1932 W. Lexington 

2-8656— Lexington, 2-9296 
Hardin, Carl, Box 19, Lebanon, 692-2214, 692-3109 
Harned, Vic, Leitchfield, 192 J, 300 
Harris, Joe D. Nebo, 249-3429 

Harrison. Fred W.. 1022 Pettus St., Clarksville, Tenn. 
Harvey, Bennie, 925 Center St., Henderson, VA 6-3758 



Harville, Robel't, 320 Churchill Court, Elizabethtown, 5-2277, 

Hay. E. Clayton, Martha, OL 2-3742, OL 2-3734 
Hayes, Douglas J., 302 nd St.. Morehead. 4-5865, 4-4381 
Heldman, Dr. John. Jr.. 140 Seneca Trail. Louisville 14, EM 

3-2181, ME 7-2531 
Hewitt. R. T., Sharp St. Murrav, PL 3-5435. PL 3-2310 e.\t. 260 
Hitch, Kenneth L., Route 1, Alexandria, MY 7-5661 
Hogan, Cleo C Sr.. Box 916. Park City, SH 9-2267, OL 1-2133 
Holt, Robert E., 600 Sanderson Dr., Hopkinsville, TU 6-1738. 

TU 6-1207 
Holt, Terrell, Box 204, College Station, Murray 
Horton, Aldrich, Box 514. Paducah 
Huddleston. James E., Box 32, Lovall, 1768 

Hudson, Oscar, 708 Highland Ave., Hazard, GE 6-3858, GE 6-2141 
Hurley, Kenneth E., 2840 Kentucky Ave., Paducah, 442-0631, 

443-9661 
Hutchens, Jim D.. Box 103, Belfi-y, EL 3-7468 
Hyatt, Bob, 4023 Glouchester Road, Louisville 7, TW 6-2540. 

JU 7-8611 
Isert, Louis, 662 South 37th St., Louisville, SP 8-1066 
.lackson, Edward, 5G Walker Apts., Owensboro, MU 3-0224 
Johnson, James M., 632 Blade Ave., Frankfort, CA 7-7822, 

CA 7-7639 
Johnson. John Luther, Virgie, 639-2167 
Johnson, Stanley, 2116 Ottawa, Owensboro 
Jones, Jerry A., 713 Broadway St.. Manchester, Ohio 
Jones, Jimmy H.. Bo.x 221, Millstone 
Jones. Joseph, 7303 Rockwood Rd., Louisville, 969-5898, 969- 

5898 
Jones, Robert, 327 Carver Court, Madisonville, TA 1-5066 (Bus.) 
Jude. Harold D.. Matewan. W. Va. 

Keeton. C. E. -'Buck", Route 3, Franklin, JU 6-4253, Nash- 
ville, Tenn., AL 6-6331 
King, Dan, 1608 Madison. Bowling Green. VI 3-3536, VI 2-0341 
King. Russell. 943 Whitney Ave., Lexington, 4-3049. 2-2370 
Kinney, Hall M.. 217 Highland Ave.. Cynthiana. 1684, U. of 

Ky. English Dept. 
Kloenne, Jack, 703 Linden Ave.. Newport, HE 1-5731 
Lambert, Irvin, 6110 Rural Way, Louisville 18, WO 9-4718, 

GL 8-1948 
Laughlin, Mel Frank, 319 Wilson Ave., Morehead, ST 4-7154 
Lawson. Leiand, 949 Deporres, Lexington, 4-1009, 2-3044 
Loney. Earl, 1037 14th St., Tell City, Ind. 
Lusby. George. 504 Clinton, Georgetown, 678-W, 1334 
McCauley, John E.. Dickson Bldg., Clarksville, Tenn. 
McGlasson. Galen, 212 North Bend Road, Hebron, 689-7330, 

689-7330 
McGlone, Maurice Baxton, Route 2, Box 95, Olive Hill, 474- 

6121 (Bus.) 
McLeod. Robert N.. Myrtlewood. Somerset, 678-5569, 678-8766 
McLean, Gordon, Red Fox, MI 2-3326 

McLin, Bruce, 575 College St.. Paintsville. 789-3607, 789-3881 
Maines. George E., 3418 Terrace Dr., Erlanger, DI 1-7460, 

EA 1-4464 
Mallory, David L., 205 N. McNarv, Princeton. 5-2688. 5-2051 
Manning. Conley. Whitley City. DR 6-2282 
Marks, Edward W., SFC, Sport N.C.O., Special Services, Fort 

Knox 
Mastin, Daryl, Route 1, Mt. Olivet, 724-3584 
Maynard, Lonnie, Freeburn, GL 6-3633 
Mays, Ralph J.. Barbourville, LI 6-3966, LI 6-413S 
Melton, Robert Eugene, 415 Meadow St., Henderson, VA 7-3067 

VA 7-1838 
Miller, Gary Lee, Olive Hill, 326-6932 
Miller, L. O., Jr., 2826 Trimble, Paducah, 442-0014 
Moore, Hobert, 109 Day St., Earlington, DU 3-6259 
Mudd, Leon, Route 4, Lambda Lodge, Bowling Green, VI 3-9266 
Mullins, Ben H., 390 Hi Street. Jenkins. 865, 768 
Nevil, Vernon E.. Route 1. Box 134 E, Radcliff, Vine Grove TR 

7-5117 
Newsom, Lawrence. 2815 Southview, Lexington, 7-3060, 4-9116 
Norris, Walter Keen, Burkesville, 2322, 91 
Owens. Byron M.. Brodhead. 758-3236 
Pack, Ervin B., Evarts, 84-K, 147 

Patterson, Joe H.. 260 N. Third St.. Danville, 236-4916, 236-5211 
Pearson, Bobby Neal, Beechmont, GR 6-8170 
Peden, Harlan, c/o Lacy School, Route 7, Hopkinsville, AM 

9-2102 (Bus.) 
Pelphrey, James R.. Box 275. Van Lear, 789-3913, 789-5391 
Perkins, William E., 481 Erie Road, Lexington, 5-3195 
Phelps, Mervil E., 211 Edwards, Owensboro, MU 3-0997, MU 

3-3571 
Philpot, Harry H, Jenson, ED 7-3220 
Pettit, Milton H, Hq. Co.. Special Services. Ft. Knox 
Phipps. Vencil, Box 51. Clark St., Barbourville 
Pogue, Ivan G.. Route 1. Lewisburg. PA 6-7095 
Potter, James E.. 1608 Hamilton. Murray. PL 3-3238 
Price, James E., Star Route, Liberty, 787-2581 
Quillen, John T.. East Main, Hazard. 6-4893, 6-3711 
Radjunas, Stan, 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland 
Rakel, Bob, 1246 Vine St.. Maysville 
Reece. Larry H.. Canmer. LA 8-2552 

Reeser, Gene, 1103 Main St.. West Point, WE 8-3110, WE 7-3540 
Reinhardt. Jerry W.. Route 2, Georgetown, Indiana, Lanes- 

ville, Ind. 58F12 
Reynolds, Howard M., 624 Nelson Place, Newport, CO 1-2980 



Rice, Eugene C, 2727 Carolyn Dr., Ashland, 325-4264, 324-4881 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



Page Five 



Rice, William, Jr.. Box 214, Hickman 

Richardson, Charles E., Waco, EM 9-6992, EM 9-6595 

Richardson. Joe M., Star Route. Clifty, 48 (Bus.) 

Richardson, Sam. 616 S. Green. Glasgow, OL 1-8136, OL 1-2133 

Riggs. Floyd L.. Route 8, Box 483, Evansville, Indiana, UN 

7-3090, HA 6-3346 
Yeary Bill, 166 Lowry Lane. Lexington, 7-1678, 7-6446 
Eobbins, Burgess, Box 93, Crab Orchard, 7191, 7641 
Roberts, Louis C, 600 Seneca Ave., Louisville, EM 8-1644 
Roby, Joseph L., 2325 Hardinsburg Ed., Owensboro, MU 3-6838 
Rose, Lee H., Transylvania College. Lexington, 4-1887, 4-2431 
Rose, Walter. Box 125. Hazel Green, MO 2-2615 
Rothfuss. Richard. 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-9190 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, Box 181, Belfry, EL 3-7883, AD 7-1121 
Rushing. Kenneth R.. Route 1. Paducah, 444-6886. 443-3631 
St. Clair Robert L., Jr., 6703 Norton Ave., Louisville, 969- 

1023, EM 6-0326 
Salisbury, Franklin D., Box 402, Martin, BU 5-3375, BU 6-3407 
Sang, Bob, 4312 Gartin Ave., Ashland, 4-4814 
Saucier Sidney P., 1/Lt., 6486 H Jamison, Ft. Knox, 4-6307. 

4-6455 
Scott. Charles E., Garrett, 358-4018, 358-4325 
Scott, Donald G., Red Bird Mission, Beverly, Pineville ED 

7-3300 
Seale, John Daniel, Box 34, Booneville, LY 3-2982, LY 3-2815 
Shelton, Benny. 847 South 9th St., Mayfield, CH 7-6664 
Shelton, Shelah K., 1021/. Jessup Ave., Hopkinsville 
Shuck, Thomas G., 960 Stonewall, Lexington, 7-1472. 2-9596, 

Slack, Earl H.. 4630 Hillside Dr., Shively, 447-3491, EM 8-1611 
Slone, Kay Douglas, Route 2, Stamping Ground, 832-4472, 160 
Small, William, Jr.. 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louisville, 

EM 8-8365, JU 4-6308 
Smith, Leonard, Albany 
Smith, Joe, Box 65. Beechmont 
Smith, William Edward. 4122 St, John's Terrace, Box 36, 

Cincinnati 36. Ohio, SY 1-3082, RE 1-2341 Ext. 267 
Sparks, James T.. 617 South 9th St.. Paducah, 442-0013 
Stamper, Harold Bovd. Helechawa, SH 3-3110 

Staples, James E.. 303 Preston, Glasgow. OL 1-8190, OL 1-2104 
Stegall, Karl Kenneth. Southern Baptist Theo. Seminary, Box 

542, Louisville 6, TW 6-9290 
Stephens, Kenneth H., Stearns, DR 6-2155, DR 6-5371 
Stines, Ray A.. London. VO 4-5001, VO 4-2610 
Strain. Richard P., Special Services, Sports Branch, Ft. Knox, 

4-1255 (Bus.) 
Stroud, Donnie M.. 2600 Frederica, Owensboro, MU 3-5403 
Stuart, Ronald, 1223 Indianola, Bowling Green 
Sturgill, Barkley. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2477, TU 6-2145 
Sumner, Harold Carl, 1866 Heaton Road, Louisville, 447-3489, 

WH 4-8685 
Swann, Randall, 110 South 9th, Central City, Lexington 22200 

Ext. 6271 
Tanner, Blakely, Haggin Hall, U. of Ky., Box 498, Lexington, 

2-2200 Ext. 6453 
Tarlton, Thomas O.. 6608 Rustic Way, Louisville 18, WO 9-5637 
Taylor, Edwin, 435 North 41st St., Louisville 12, SP 2-0126, 

JU 7-6526 
Thomas, Frank M.. 630 South 10th St., Louisville 3, 683-6354, 

JU 4-9178 
Thomas, James G., 4102 Naneen Dr., Louisville. 363-0209, 

SP 6-2421 
Thomas, Leo Anthony, Box 118, Aberdeen, Ohio, SY 5-2133 
Thompson. Arthur Lee, Smith Hill, Pikeville, GE 7-4476, GE 

7-9141 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga, Louisville, GL 2-9255 
Thompson. Ralph N.. 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, BL 

1-3394, CL 1-2926 
Timmons, C. Dwight, 707 South 10th, Mayfield, CH 7-1642, 

CH 7-3401 
Tinsley, Marion Francis, Ash St., Box 447, Central City, 1721, 

Tirey, Lt. Col. James H., U. S. Army Maint. Board, Ft. Knox, 

4-3562. 4-8359 
Todd, James L.. 301 Main St., Earlington, DU 3-6320, DU 3-4421 
Todd. Lonnie H., Route 2, Madisonville, TA 1-5028, TA 1-6862 
Todd, W. O.. Jr.. Route 3. Eubank, 678-5351 (Bus.) 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green St.. Fulton. 1066, 309 
Trivette, Dale, Box 223. Virgie, 639-2265, 639-4774 
Triplett. Herb, Main Street, Owingsville 
Troutman, Doyle, Box 304, Harlan, 1937 

Trusty, Frank II, 3102 River, Box 322. Jackson. NO 6-6346 
Tuck, L. Ochell. 124 Lexington Dr., Glasgow, 3331, 3811 
Tucker, Neal R.. Dunmor, SK 5-8556, Hopkinsville BR 1-2020 
Tucker. Roscoe, Jr.. G-5 Batewood. Danville 
Turner, Bruce, 1456 High St., Paris, 634, 9030 
Turner, Jack, 11 Sweetbriar, Florence, AT 3-1623 
Turner, James W.. Garrett, 368-2151 
Tyre, Donald C. 714 Benson, Frankfort, CA 3-3668, CA 7-2231 

ext 361 
Urlage, Richard. 822 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, HL 1-5513, 

GR 1-8120 
Vallandingham, Dale, 1807 Holman, Covington, AX 1-5188 
VanArsdall, Fred, Box 104, Burgin, 748-6104, 748-6180 
Vannerson, Duke. Route 2, Paducah, 442-3600, 444-9439 
Vanover, Walter S., 1101 Jefferson, Evansville, Indiana, GR 

6-8137, HA 4-6481 ext. 214 
Van Meter, Kaye Don, Bee Spring, LY 7-3676. LY 7-3605 



VanSant, William E., 101 Holiday Lane, Lakeside Park, So. 

Ft. Mitchell, DI 1-6087 
VanWinkle. Billy R., 2600 E. Cloverdale, Owensboro, MU 3- 

4617, MU 8-2207 
VanZant, Jim, East 2nd St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Vance, Hunter. Jr.. 1270 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, VI 

2-3631 (Bus.) 
Vaughn, Ronald G., Freeburn, GL 6-3633, GL 6-3965 
Varner, Ray G.. 12370 Roberts. P. O. Box 427. Boron, Calif. 
Vermillion, Charles D.. 103 Bishop St., Corbin, 1462 
Vescovi, Raymond B.. 3626 Laurel Ave.. Evansville. Indiana, 

HA 3-8144. WO 3-3124 
Vettiner, Charlie, 460 Armory Place, Louisville, JU 3-6671 or 

JU 3-2618 (Bus.) 
Vinciguerra, Philip. Matewan. W. Va. 
Vinson, Ray T.. McRoberts. 659 
Vipperman, Al. Ransom, GA 7-2810, EL 3-7362 
Vowell, Darrell O., 224 Clinton, Hickman. 2806, 2019 
Wagner, Marvin Rudy, Route 1, Box 455, Pikeville, GE 7-4611 
Waide, Harry D.. 503 S .Madison, Madisonville, TA 1-1998, 

TA 1-3870 
Walker, Paul R., Reservoir Hill Park, Bowling Green, VI 

3-8893 VI 3-8326 
Wallen, Howard W., Williamsport, 789-3066, 789-5060 
Walls, Harry B., 1310 Walter, Louisville, EM 6-3464, ME 

7-3611 
Walters, Bayard H.. 601 Cherry St., Henderson. VA 6-9973 
Walters, Bob. Box 921. Pikeville. GE 7-6237, SK 4-8184 
Ward, Harold S.. Paint Lick. 926-2766 
Ward, Jack, 1909 Circle Ave.. Owensboro, MU 3-4147. MU 

Ward, Robert, 301 Southside Drive, Henderson, 7-3805, 7-9264 

Warner, Marvin, Nancy, 678-4844, 678-4942 

Watkins, Byron C, P. O. Box 33, White Plains, OR 6-3963, 

OR 6-3440 
Watkins, Paul D., 1706 Navajo Drive, Owensboro, 683-8725, 

683-3675 
Watson, Clifford, 66 McCuUum, Independence, 359-6665, 356- 

9511 
Way, James, 211 Penn, Cynthiana, 1300, 586 
Wearren, Wade H.. 4401 Norene, Louisville 
Weathers, Charles, Jr., 3620 Grand Ave., Louisville 11, SP 

4-2944 
Weaver, B. H., Robin Road, Horse Cave, ST 6-6781, ST 6-6181 
Weaver, Ray, 55 Thompson, So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 1-3761 
Weber, John, 3204 Watson, Covngton, AX 1-8662 
Webster, Paul, 302 Delaware St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-0390, 

JE 2-9458 
Weisbrodt, Paul E., 837 Sherwood, Lexington, 7-3924, 7-3457 
Welch, John H., Mayking. 2928. Jenkins 243 
Welch, Tom, 3932 Vine Vista PI. Cincinnati, Ohio AV 1-8094, 

GA 1-6700 ext. 691 
Wells. Bobby W., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2101, TU 6-3383 
Wells, Milford. 344 Bays Ave., Morehead, ST 4-5781, Frankfort 

CA 7-2231 ext. 386 
Wesche, James A., 427 Queensway. Lexington, 6-7263, 5-2780 
Westerfield, Glenn, 3216 Bedford, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-9570. HA 5-2247 
Westhoff, Robert A.. 26 St. Jude's Circle, Florence, AT 3-2971, 

DI 1-5055 
Whalen, William C, Route 1, Maysville, LO 4-3942, LO 4-3461 
Wheatley, Donald, 117 Payne St., Lebanon, 692-4624. 692-3103 
White, Charles W.. Route 2. Mt. Sterling, 1845, 266 
White, David B.. 237 Longview Dr., Bowling Green, VI 3-3884, 

VI 3-4331 
White, J. L.. 1928 Gary Ave.. Bowling Green, VI 2-2463, VI 

White, William Jason, Eddyville, 3052, 3101 

White, William L.. Garrard. LY 8-3766. LY 8-4001 

Whitehouse, Donald Lee. 121 North Ashland Ave.. Winchester 

Wiggington, Al, Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave.. Louisville. SP 6-7881 

Wilcox, Edgel M., 405 Lowell Ave. Campbellsville, 465-4267 

Wilcox, Ursal R., Auxier. TU 6-3329, TU 6-3086 

Wiler, James W.. Blaine. OL 2-3541 

Wilham, Earl, 361 Barr St.. Harridsburg, 734-3335 

Willett, Arthur "Bud", 114 Madison, Bardstown, 348-5515, 

348-9960 
Williams, Bobby, 220 Stratford Ave., Richmond, 623-3894, 623- 

4959 
Williams, Billy F., Irvine, 723-3345 

Williams, Benny. Route 3. Philpot. Owensboro PA 9-4566 
Williams, Donald, 125 Broadway, Irvine, 723-3393, 723-2515 
Williams, Jim. 2428 Adams St.. Ashland, 325-2733, 324-8282 
Williams, Joe W.. U. S. 27. Stearns. DR 6-2380. EL 4-2611 
Williams, Paul Winston, Room 365. North Men's Hall, More- 
head St. College. Morehead. Paintsville 789-4503 
Williams, Rod, 122 Lorraine Court, Berea, 986-3743 
Williams, Roger, 404 Bond St., Richmond, 623-3126 
Williams, Willie H„ 619 C. Aspendale Dr., Lexington. 2-1654, 

2-3212 
Willis, Donald A.. Allen TR 4-2485, BU 5-3407 
Wilson, H. G., 205 N. Maple, Somerset, 679-1290, 679-1544 
Wilson, Jack R., 617 West Main, Morehead, ST 4-5624, ST 

4-4443 
Wilson, S. O., Jr., 801 Meadow Lane, Murray. PL 3-6625 
Winfrey, Shelby, 108 Holly, Berea, 986-3084, 986-3084 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

A unique thing occurred during this 
year's clinics, that being that the Newport 
Clinic scheduled for October 8 had to be re- 
scheduled for October 23 because the World 
Series was going on in Cincinnati at that 
time. 

One rule change is causing concern. It is 
coaching from the bench. Coaches must stay 
at their benches. They will not be allowed to 
move away from them. We will not permit 
written instructions to be handed to the play- 
ers. A hazard develops when little slips of 
paper are dropped all over the playing floor. 

The clinics become increasingly popular 
with the college coaches each year. One coach, 
following the Dutchman around the state in 
Western Kentucky, was surprised that so 
many who attended afternoon clinics turned 
right around and followed the rules inter- 
preter to his night clinic. During the past two 
decades, it has been noticeable and the Dutch- 
man flattered himself that the officials en- 
joyed the sessions so much that they just 
could not stay away from them. His ego was 
deflated later when an official explained that 
it was not the clinics, themselves, which caus- 
ed them to be repeaters. Rather, they wanted 
to meet the coaches at these sessions and 
schedule some games to officiate. Then 
Caverna's personable and popular Coach 
Ralph Dorsey explained that these are fine 
social occasions. Coaches have enjoyable 
afternoons and evenings together so they do 
not content themselves with one clinic. Once 
again, a deflated Dutch ego. 

John W. Lovell submitted a poem to a 
Rotary Club magazine which goes like this : 
Sometimes, when you're feeling, important, 
Sometimes, when your ego's in bloom. 
Sometimes, when you take it for granted, 
You're the best qualified in the room. 
Sometimes when you feel that your going. 
Would leave an unfillable hole. 
Just follow this simple instruction. 
And see how it humbles your soul. 
Take a bucket and fill it up with water, 
Put your hand in it, up to the wrist ; 
Pull it out ; and the hole that's remaining, 
Is a measure of how you'll be missed. 
Somerset's progressive Athletic Director, 
Bill Clark, writes, "Your visit is one of the 
highlights of the school year as far as we 
down here are concerned." My Somerset 
clinic is terrific for me. Bill Clark not only 
does a tremendous job with the clinic but he 
also sets up a steak dinner with T-bones an 
inch thick. You always find Jim Williams, 



Billy Johns, Doug Hines. Johnny Lloyd, and 
Basil Jones eating "high on the hog" — I 
should say cow — with the Dutchman and 
Bill. The Dutchman forgot to tell Harry 
Lancaster that he had an invitation to this 
annual fiesta. I hate myself for eating 
Harry's steak. 

At Beaver Dam Bobby Anderson, Sports 
Editor of the Central City Times-Argus, 
nominated Bob Daniels, Coach of Muhlen- 
berg Central High School, for the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award. Bobby said that 
Coach Daniels went beyond the c^ll of duty 
in aiding a fellow teacher, Gary Rudolph, in 
a musical show by the high school band at 
the Central City Band Festival. Handsome 
Bob Daniels, dressed in short, short, shorts 
to go with his long, long legs, assumed the 
role of a comic drum major to replace the 
"baton twirler" who failed to show up. He 
saved the day and "wowed" the crowd. 

W. H. Crowdus, Chairman of the Board 
of Control, made some timely remarks at the 
Bowling Green Clinic, pointing out that of- 
ficiating is a serious business. Get him to 
tell you the joke about the two porcupines. 

Coach Ted Lenhardt, University of Ken- 
tucky, asked the Dutchman if the clinics 
were not a tough grind. Here is my Dutch 
philosophy: one fellow looks at a job and 
says, "Gee what a chore!" Another looks at 
it and says, "What a ball I am going to 
have !" 

It is fun to find swell guys like "Beef 
Showalter on hand year after year at the 
Lexington Clinic. "Beef" is one of Kentucky's 
immortals in any sport. You name the game 
and Johnny Showalter has done something 
for it. 

At the same clinic there is always the 
enthusiastic Bobby Flynn, a youngster des- 
tined to make his mark in the officiating 
ranks. "Doc" Farrell joined Hazard's Goebel 
Ritter in pointing out that the Dutchman's 
hair is not as thick as it used to be and that 
his waistline is protruding. They are great 
"kidders." ... I hope. 

Get a copy of the October 29 Magazine 
of the Courier-Journal and look over the pic- 
torial story of the new rules made in Harry 
Hardin's Fairdale High School Gymnasium. 
Principal Harry and his coach, "Frosty" 
Able, did a swell job setting up these pic- 
tures. Incidentally, Fairdale is now a 4-year 
High School and issued its first High School 
Paper, "THE SPECTATOR," on October 6. 
It is a "crackerjack" periodical. 

From Elizabethtown comes a letter from 
Grace Weller, past president of the K. E. A., 
saying that the Testimonial Dinner for 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



Page Seven 



Rineyville's H. L. Perkins was a roaring suc- 
cess and that "Perk" loved being the re- 
cipient of the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award. 
While Wood Gardner assembles his in- 
formation on Park City's Game Guy, we are 
releasing the first recommendation of the 
sports year. Kean Jenkins, Elizabethtown 
Sports Official, nominates Dan Ray Clagett 
for the honor of Game Guy of 1962. Dan is 
the son of Dr. and Mrs. R. T. Clagett of 
Elizabethtown. Although he had polio at the 
age of four, he is now active in baseball and 
football and presently is playing in a Jaycee 
Junior Football League. Dan recently com- 
pleted an 18-mile hike on Oxbow Trail in 
Harrv Hardin's Fairdale country- 
Did you know that a national magazine 
in New Jersey is doing a story on the Abou 
Ben Adhem Awards? 

Send in your choice for the Abou Ben 
Adhem or the individual you think deserves 
a Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award. These are 
the things which make life enjoyable. They 
help you forget some of your troubles. 

Incidentally, if you could onlv kick the 
person who is most responsible for most of 
your troubles, you wouldn't be able to sit 
down. 

The Coach's Wife 

As the end of the football season ap- 
proaches, there is one group of individuals 
that we seldom hear about that should be 
signally honored. That group consists of the 
wives of the football coaches. No single group 
contributes as much to our athletic program 
as the "little woman" who sit? quietly behind 
the scenes. She deserves a special tribute for 
her many services "beyond the call of duty." 

The coach's wife is a "mother confessor." 
After each game she listens to her husband 
pour out words of glee or sorrow, depending 
upon whether his team won or lost. She is 
the one who keeps the proper balance by en- 
couraging words and smiles. Many a coach 
has been consoled by the words of a loving 
wife to the effect, "So what ! we lost tonight, 
but it's only a ball game and we still have 
each other." 

The wife must endure the stony silence, 
the moody and pessimistic periods, and yea, 
the optimistic, boisterous, and happy mo- 
ments of the coach. She must be similar to a 
chameleon and change her conduct to fit the 
situation; encouraging and sympathetic 
when the coach loses ; calm and happy when 
the coach wins. S'he must be patient, under- 
standing, cooperative and long-suffering. 
Golden Rule 

The coadh's wife' is the pretty woman who 



sits in the stands and bites her lips to keep 
control of herself when the person behind her 
says "How dumb can a coach be to do such a 
thing." She has to listen to abuse in many 
ways from spectators about her husband 
coach and, God bless her, she conducts her- 
self in such a way that it reminds us of the 
Golden Rule, "Do unto others as you would 
have them do unto you." 

Her tears are concealed, her feelings sup- 
pressed, as she listens to a few loud-mouth- 
ed morons assail her husband's abilities as a 
coach. In many ways, the wife hears more 
and bears more than the husband, as he is 
usually too far removed from the stands to 
hear the derogatory remarks. 

The assistant coach, without pay from 
the school, is the coach's wife. She answers 
the coach's mail, the telephone at all hours 
of the night, prepares meals for the extra 
people who are always "dropping in," and 
serves as a special consultant in psychological 
and sociological problems for her husband, 
members of the teams, and her family. After 
the game she always has coffee and sand- 
wiches available for the "drop ins." If the 
team wins, many come, and she has to pre- 
pare more food ; if they lose, very few come, 
and the coach's family has to eat sandwiches 
for a week. As assistant coach she listens to 
her husband go over all hh plays, both de- 
fensively and offensively ; and after the 
game when the lights are out at home, the 
game is played by the coach to an attentive 
listener — his wife. 

Household Duties 

Besides these many duties as the coach's 
"right hand man," she is the mother of his 
family and must "run" the household duties, 
look after the health and welfare of the chil- 
dren, serve as P-TA "*home room mother," 
teach a Sunday School class, and perform 
numerous other duties at home and in the 
community. She is the one who gives the 
coach his poise, confidence, hope, balance, 
and her love is an inspiratioti that overcomes 
all obstacles. The coach guides boys into cor- 
rect ways of thinking, livir^g and doing in 
athletic events largely through the influence 
of two women — his mother and his wife. 

My hat is off to the wife of the coach. 
Her many contributions to the athletic pro- 
gram has in general been overlooked by all, 
with the exception of her husband, the coach. 
This writer knows from personal experience 
how much a coach's wife means to her hus- 
band during the strains, tensions, and irrita- 
tions of a strenuous football season. We men 
usually take those things for granted on the 
part of our wives, but l^t's all make a point 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



to let her know how much we appreciate her 
contributions. 

Regardless of whether or not you coaches 
tell her how much you appreciate her, she 
■will continue to do the same thing for you in 
the years to come because she is a woman 
and she loves you. Thank God for women who 
become coaches' wves — without them coach- 
ing would often be a dreary and forlorn ad- 
venture. 

—Dr. Rhea H. Williams 
Interscholastic Leaguer 

Films 

The films listed below are in the Film Library of 
the University of Kentucky Department of Extension. 
The Code letters "e,j,s,e,a" refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Basketball 
BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 

$1.50 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment, before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 
BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photogra- 
phy,, and action shots are combined in this new film 
prepared under the personal direction of Mr. Rupp 
especially for coaching use. Among the drills and 
plays covered in this film are: pivot man's slide into 
the basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky Basket 
Maker; legal screening; - penetrating zone defense; 
and the Kentucky fast break. 
BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Of- 
ficial Sports Film Service under the sanction of the 
National Federation. A fantastic dream sequence 
where impossible and nightmarish situations can and 
do arise is the continuity thread used throughout the 
film to depict: Accepted officiating procedures — prob- 
lems created by double fouls and false double fouls — 
tricky situations connected with front and back court 
— jump ball infractions and procedures — little under- 
stood distinction between player and team control — 
and a panorama of basic rule fundamentals. 
BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 

TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, li,» reels, $2.50 

Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow-motion photography is used to 
break the various com-t techniques down into easily 
grasped essentials. 
BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

$2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 

This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 

reel, $1.50 

The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 



and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 

BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning) passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right 
pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shooting (fing- 
er control, arm extension, wrist flip, choice of the right 
shot), dribbling, making, and pivoting are demon- 
strated and explained in this film. 
BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a-, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Service under the sanction of the National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations. It dem- 
onstrates current rules and good officiating procedure, 
with colorful action by skilled players. 
CARR CREEK VS. HENDERSON (1956) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

The final game of the 1956 State Basketball 
Tournament is shown in this film. Carr Creek High 
School defeated Henderson by a narrow margin, 72 
to 68, to win the championship. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 

Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 
DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 
1 reel, $1.50 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuver- 
ing him out of position and other basic skills are 
illustrated, using special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm ac- 
tion are taught also. 

DUNBAR VS. ASHLAND (1961) Finals), e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels (33 min.), color, silent, $.75 
The Tomcats from Ashland High School won the 
final game of the tournament by defeating Dunbar 
High School of Lexington 69-50. The Ashland team 
won the tournament after eliminating William Grant, 
Seneca and Wheelwright to reach the final game. 
EASTERN VS. LAFAYETTE (1957) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

The final game of the 1957 K.H.S. State Tourna- 
ment was played in Freedom Hall at the Kentucky 
Fair Grounds and Exposition Center before a record 
crowd of 18,000. The final score was 56-52 as the 
Lafayette Generals won the crown for the fourth time. 
HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
This is an excellent film of the game in which 
Hazard defeated Adair County by the score of 74-65 
for the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 
of the attack by the champions while all-state play- 
ers, Ralph Shearer and Terry Randall, were best for 
Adair County. The presentation of all awards and 
trophies for the tournament is shown also. 
HIGHLIGHTS OF 1956 STATE BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, sound, $.75 
Interesting scenes of events during the tourna- 
ment are shown in this film. Action shots of the 
crowd, cheerleaders, and bands are shown in addition 
to a part of the play in each tournament game. 
MONTICELLO VS. FLAGET (1960 K.H.S. A. A. 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, silent, $.75 
Flaget High School of Louisville defeated Monti- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



Page Nine 



cello High School in the final game of the tournament 
to win the championship. The Braves came from be- 
hind in the last half to overtake the Trojans and win 
by a score of 65-56. 

NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL 
(1959) K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
The Indians of North Marshall High School prov- 
ed too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the 
final game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State 
players, Doyle and Lampley, were best for the win- 
ners, while Melear and Siers led the Reds. 
OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (40 min.), 
color, $.75 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations 
covering screening, traveling, jump ball, front and 
back court, throw-ins, free throws, personal and 
technical fouls, rebounding, and unusual and often 
misunderstood play situations. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 

Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such a 
clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn each 
play. 

RUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMP- 
IONSHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the high lights of all the 
games, both regular season and tournament games, 
which led up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the 
NCAA basketball crown. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total body 
coordination, especially inward rotation of the hand 
and arm making the throw. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (1958) K. H. S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the final game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 



SOME REFLECTIONS ON SPORT . . . 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
United Nations recognizes the contribution which 
sport can make to education for international u.ader- 
standing and cooperation. The success of the coaches 
we have sent overseas as good will abassadors is 
widely recognized. 

The impact of technological advances on sports 
performance is shown with a single illustration, the 
pole vault. With the bamboo pole only one man vaulted 
fifteen feet. Several weeks ago at the N.C.A.A. champ- 
ionships in Philadelphia, eight me.T cleared fifteen 
feet, using steel and fiberglass vaulting poles. The 
record today stands at 15' 10%,". 

Sport in Education 

At the outset I said sport will achieve greater 
acceptance in education when we control malpractices 
and establish more convincingly, through historical 
and social research, that the same cultural importance 
attaches to sport as is presently enjoyed by music, 
various forms of the dance, art, literature and other 
folkways. Having given some modest insights to the 
histoi'ical and social significance of sport, time limi- 
tations cause me to move on to a brief consideration of 
some of our problems in the schools. 



Interschool athletics can, and do, serve valuable 
purposes in school programs. They have tremendous 
educational potential which is due lai-gely to the 
nature of the sports experience itself and the strong 
interest shown by members of the community. 

For the individual participant the key benefits 
are: development of physical vigor and sound health 
habits; opportunity for expression of physical, emo- 
tional and social drives; the making of strong friend- 
ships; and the leaining of important social and moral 
lessons. 

For the student body: athletics are a lallying 
point for school morale; they are part of the bioad 
social and moral experiences offered by the school, 
with lessons in personal and group living which 
should never be sidetracked for less worthy and 
transient purposes. 

For the community: school administrators have 
long sought to develop a wholesome, active interest in 
the total school program on the part of citizens in 
the community. Athletics is one area where they 
have been successful (some administrators have felt 
that they have been to successful here). This strong 
community interest in sports should be directed to their 
real purposes in the educational program. Some day 
we may discover how to get equally strong community 
interest in English, science and mathematics programs. 
The role of the school in the sports life of America 
is nicely summarized by Cozens and Stumpf. It is 
the training ground for the sports tastes and habits 
of future adults. It is the actual locale for much of 
the sports and play life of a sizable group of the 
population, the students themselves. And finally, the 
sports activities of the school often form an integral 
part of the recreational life of the rest of the com- 
munity. 

The competitive sports movement in schools and 
colleges has become so vast and so complicated that 
complete control is difficult because the " how" of 
such control is not really known. School and college 
administrators, conference, league, and state and 
national association officials are groping for rea- 
sonable controls, trying to find a balance for authority 
between the individual school and the conferences and 
associations. The problem of conducting sports pro- 
grams in closer conformity to the purposes of educa- 
tion must be resolved moi'e effectively before full 
educational acceptance can be achieved. The fact that 
moral and ethical problems exist in society, in govern- 
ment, and in our most lespected professions does 
not lessen our responsibility for improving our own 
practices. 

As in other areas of society, we exiierience con- 
flicts in values in our sports programs. The conflicts 
cause us to operate under what might be called a 
dual morality. On one hand we point ou the bene- 
fits of our sports programs to the individual, the in- 
stitutions and also the state and the nation. We do 
this with considerable justification because the values 
are there. But, on the other hand, we also find in our 
sports programs the profit motive, emphasis on the 
champion and record-breaker, and victory as the 
chief, if not the only value. The factors have led to 
practices which are clearly ethically and morally in 
conflict with our stated educational aims. Our dis- 
tress becomes more complete when we find that the 
high-sounding claims and unethical practices are often 
the speech and behavior of the same individuals. 
Allegations, denials, investigations and penalties 
have become too prominent in the lives of officials of 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



our conference ar.d state and national athletic associ- 
ations. 

in trying to maintain standards in our sports 
programs whicli are compatible with our values and 
the status we seek in education, we must plan our 
action carefully. 

When a practice is widespread and extends over 
a long period of time, it tends to become accepted, 
even though it might have been regarded as undesir- 
able at the outset. A little over thirty years ago the 
famous Carnegie Report on Intercollegiate Athletics 
claimed the three great sins in college athletics were 
recruiting, subsidizing and proselyting. Today, only 
proselyting is still a sin, and that is primarily be- 
cause of the need of each institution to retain its 
hard-won prospects. Recruiting is accepted today 
because it is a common practice in all phases of life; 
government workers, the military service, and in- 
dustry are some examples. Universities also recruit 
talented students, musicians, and scientists and scho- 
lars for their faculty as assiduously as we seek 
athletes. 

Subsidizing in athletics is now dignified by the 
term "grant-in-aid." But, all around us are many 
forms of subsidy. Fellowships, scholarships, intern- 
ships and work-study plans are so numerous that a 
large percentage of all graduate and many under- 
graduate students are subsidized to some extent. 
Subsidization has reached its full flower of develop- 
ment in the largess of the Federal Government, 
both here and abroad. 

So, in one sense, social changes may solve some 
of our problems through common and extended 
practice. While we may accept a formerly unaccep- 
table practice, there is still the matter of degree. 
If recruiting and various forms of aid are legal, are 
all bars to come down? Obviously not, because a 
practice may lose its acceptability because it is pushed 
beyond bounds. 

The daily work of your High School Athletic 
Association Commissioners and High School and 
College National Athletic Association Officers is 
fraught with problems, crises and just plain hard 
work. You and the local school and college adminis- 
trators can view your work with justifiable pride. 
You are the watchdogs of our sports ethics and 
standards and you do your jobs courageously and 
effectively. You have not eliminated all malpractices, 
but your success will stand comparison with the 
efforts to remove evils in other aspects of American 
life. 

In order to have interschool sports gain their 
rightful place in American education, we must push 
forward on two fronts. The first is to develop more 
extensive programs of education and control within 
the profession of sports and physical education. Start- 
ing in our professional preparation courses in colleges 
and universities and extending up through state and 
national associations, we must wage unrelenting war- 
fare against the practices which are contrary to the 
real purposes of sport in education. Concurrently we 
must work for better understanding of the problems 
and controls through scientific social research. 

Secondly, we must develop research programs 
designed to provide convincing evidence that sport is 
of historical and social significance, meriting the 
same academic and cultural consideration given to 
other areas of academic endeavor. 

Human nature being what it is, the struggle for 
high standards in our sports programs will never end. 



But you and your successors may ultimately win 
victories far more important than those won by 
the champions you crown as part of your work. 



BEHAVIOR ON THE BENCH . . . 

(Continued from Page One) 

National Basketball Committee are capably 
expressing the rules of the game, and I will 
abide by these rules in both spirit and letter. 

I BELIEVE in the exercise of all the pa- 
tience, tolerance, and diplomacy at my 
command in my relations with all players, 
co-workers, game officials and spectators. 

I BELIEVE that the proper administra- 
tion of this sport offers an effective labora- 
tory method to develop in its adherents high 
ideals of sportsmanship ; qualities of coopera- 
tion, courage, unselfishness and self-control, 
desires for clean, healthful living, and respect 
for wise discipline and authority. 

I BELIEVE that these admirable charac- 
teristics, properly instilled by me through 
teaching and demonstration, will have a long 
carryover and will aid each one connected 
with the sport to become a better citizen. 

I BELIEVE in and will support all rea- 
sonable moves to improve athletic conditions, 
to provide for adequate equipment and to 
promote the welfare of an increased number 
of participants. 



Food Facts and Fallacies 

Athletics are surrounded by superstitions 
and fallacies about foods and diet. Some 
probably reflect the practices of athletes 
who became champions in spite of, rather 
than because of peculiar dietary habits. 
Others may go back to primitive beliefs that 
the meat of certain animals would endow the 
consumer with the courage, strength, and 
endurance of the prey. What are the facts 
as we know them today? 

First, we know that caloric intake and 
physical activity output are interdependent 
in maintaining desirable weight. An active 
football player, for example, might consume 
5,000' calories a day without putting on ex- 
cess pounds. An inactive student with other- 
wise similar characteristics would soon be- 
come obese were he to eat at the same daily 
rate. 

Second, the evidence indicates that in 
general the athlete needs substantially the 
same balance and variety of foods as his 
peers. Each day he shou.ld have liberal 
amounts of (1) enriched or whole grain 
bread and cereals, (2) meat or meat sub- 
stitutes, (3) milk and milk products, and 
(4) fruits and vegetables. Food not included 
in these groups such as butter or margarine 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



Page Eleven 



and sugar when used with these foods or 
in cooking supply additional calories. 

Third, we know that no specific foods nor 
vitamin products can is themselves upgrade 
athletic performance. Claims to the contrary 
are not supported by clear-cut evidence with 
the conflicting results of some studies sug- 
gesting that supposed benefits are psycho- 
logical in nature. An athlete whose diet lack- 
ed essential nutrients would perform better, 
of course, if the shortage were remedied, but 
such shortages are rare today and must be 
determined medically. 

Other facts of interest in terms of the 
athlete's diet relate to the need for break- 
fast, the number and spacing of meals, water 
balance, the types of foodstuffs, and the 
pregame meal. 

The need for breakfast: A number of 
students of the efficiency of industrial work- 
ers as well as of the performance of athletes 
indicate the need for a wholesome breakfast. 
Almost without exception, the subjects in 
these studies who eat a good breakfast per- 
form in superior fashion. 

Number and spacing of meals: That 
the athlete needs at least three meals a day 
for optimum performance has been demon- 
strated experimentally. There is some indica- 
tion that more frequent spacing might be 
desirable in cei'tain instances and, of course, 
the young athlete, while growing, will often 
take a snack in the afternoon and another in 
the evening. 

Water Balance: For best performance, 
particularly in hot weather, there should be 
hourly replacement of the water lost in 
sweat. The old taboo against taking water 
during work outs has no scientific founda- 
tion. However, intake at any time should be 
held to one-half water glass. In hot weather, 
salt needs daily replacement; extra salting 
of foods at meals is ordinarily sufficient for 
this purpose. 

Types of foodstuffs: Recent research 
suggests that an emphasis on carbohydrates 
in the diet of the athlete, particularly for 
endurance events may be warranted. Also 
contrary to the traditional ideas, research in- 
dicates that "going heavy" on protein in the 
training diet serves no useful purpose. The 
studies show that in strenuous activity there 
is an increased utilization of carbohydrates 
if these are available; protein, as was for- 
merly believed, does not seem, to be the chief 
source of muscular energy. 

The pregame meal: There is ample rea- 
son, as trainers and coaches know, to space 
the last meal three to four hours prior to the 
event. The strong emotions felt by the ath- 



lete in the competitive setting have less 
effect upon the digestive processes when the 
last meal is eaten well in advance of the 
contest. Except for prolonged events like the 
marathon, stores of energy are sufficient 
for strenuous activity and the athlete's effic- 
iency is not affected by the amount or kind 
of pregame meal. 

As is true in other areas of athletic train- 
ing, it is the regular practice of good dietary 
habits that leads to optimum performance. 
Plaicing reliance upon some "magic pill" or 
"special food" can result in neglect of balanc- 
ed nutrition which is the cornerstone of ath- 
letic conditioninig. The athlete's own resourc- 
es of courage and confidence based upon 
careful coaching and conditioning provide the 
best assurance of good performnce. 

— National Federation and A.M.A. 

Who Is To Blame? 

We were shocked when the news of the 
latest basketball "fix" cases hit the head- 
lines. 

Why did these young men do what they 
did? Why did they turn traitor to their 
sichools, their teammates and to the game 
that hag been so good to them? 

There are those who are quick to lay the 
blame at the doorstep of college athletics. 
No doubt some of the blame belongs there, 
but certainly not all of it. The homes from 
which these boys come, the elementary and 
high schools which they attended, and the 
communities in which they lived must ac- 
cept the fact that a young man's sense of 
values has been largely determined before 
he enrolls in a college or university. A boy's 
idea of what is right and what is wrong is 
based upon examples set by adults — first his 
parents, then his teachers, and finally the 
adults of the community in which he lives. 

The parents who fail to make a child 
understand that honesty and integrity are 
wares that cannot be purchased with money 
or other material things ; the teacher who 
neglects to teach the virtue of loyalty to 
family, school and friends; the coach who 
teaches a boy that it is all right to violate the 
rules if you don't get caught, who looks the 
other way when a star athlete violates train- 
ing rules or other regulations, who advises a 
boy to accept an "under cover" offer of a 
recruiter; the school principal who permits 
an athlete to get the idea that because of his 
athletic ability he is entitled to special con- 
sideration ; the ardent fan who slips a player 
a ten dollar bill for scoring the winning 
touchdown or hitting a grand slam homerun ; 
and the school boosters who brag about get- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1961 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 
FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 

Phone Triangle 3-3623 

Distributors of: 



Spanjian (Eastern Ky. only) 

Southern 

Nocona 

Wilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky, 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 



Bike 

Cramer 

Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Riddell Helmets & Shoes 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



7-3977 



Dick Wallace 



ting around TSSAA regulations by moving 
a (good athlete into their community — all 
must bear a share of the responsibility for 
helping some young man to reach the con- 
clusion that the smart thing to do is to take 
care of himself when the opportunity pre- 
sents itself and that loyalty to school team- 
mates, and to the sport he is playing are 
secondary matters. 

We cannot undo what has already been 
done, but we can, as schoo] people, redouble 
our efforts to make sure that this kind of 
shame does not come to us again. If we are 
to be successful we must obtain a high de- 
gree of cooperation from the parents and 
adults in our communities. The civic clubs, 
the PTA, community leaders interested in 
sports, and dhurch leaders should be enlist- 
ed to aid the school in its efforts to teach all 
students that personal integrity, loyalty to 
family, friends and institutions that are the 
foundation stones of our civilization are not 
for sale at any prite. 

— T. S. S. A. A. News 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Five 

Winchester. Roy L.. 7405 Vaughn Mill Rd., Louisville 18, 

CE 9-5202, TW 5-0567 
Wingfield, Felix G., 1132 Eastern Parkway, Louisville, ME 

6-2282, ME 6-2282 
Wirtz, Howard A., 6510 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 

JA 2-1813, PL 1-1323 
Wise. Billy V.. 2112 St. Teresa, Lexington, 6-7449, 2-5494 & 

2-0410 
Wise, Jack. 408 Fountain Ave., Georgetown, 2052, 120 
Wolford, Hoover, Phelps, GL 6-3447 

Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb, Henderson, VA 6-4526 
Wood, Ellsworth, Brooksville, RE 5-5438 

Wood. H. Phillip, Route 6. Bowling Green. VI 2-0168, VI 2-5624 
Wood, Kenneth C., 547 Robin Ave., Frankfort, CA 3-0244 
Woods, Fairce O., Box 247, Jackson, NO 6-6384, NO 6-2805 
Woods, Gene, Route 2. Kirksey, 489-2595 

Woodward, Billy, 17 Reynolds Village, Owensboro, MU 3-9710 
Woodward, Danny H., P. O. Box 253, Nortonville, OR 6-3200, 

TA 1-6463 
Wright. Billy Joe. Salt Lick, OR 4-3927 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 714 Cedar Grove Court, Louisville, SP 

4-5173, SY 7-1161 ext. 433 & 434 
Wright, James Lloyd, 317 Gano Ave., Georgetown, 450-W, 460-W 
Wright, John H., 1912 Herbert St., Murphysboro, Illinois, 1236-R 
Wrigley. Joseph. 805 N. Race St., Glasgow 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, DU 1-1232, 

GR 1-0526 
Yancey, William T.. 3618 Waggoner, Evansville, Indiana, GR 

7-4336, HA 4-5575 
Yanoff, Jay Myron. 3702 Stanton, Louisville, GL S-7574 
Yarbrough, Curtis, Route 2, Central City, 1534 
Yates, Howard C. "Rusty". 2400 Monroe St., Ashland 
Yates, Virgil, Route 1. Wingo, 376-2432, 376-3271 
Yeary, Bill. 156 Lowry Lane, Lexington. 7-1578. 7-6446 
Zachem. Vincent. 115 West Wind Trail, Bardstown, TI 8-8985, 

TI 8-5109 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 
TEACHERS, COACHES AND 
ADMINISTRATORS OF OUR 

KENTUCKY SCHOOLS 

FOR YOUR FINE EFFORTS 

ON BEHALF OF 

THE CHILDREN 

OF OUR STATE. 



KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



7(4« I^Uufdeit 6<unfUi>H4f> 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 
608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



i 



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High School Affihte 



Class AA State Champion Highlands 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Hauck, Roger W alz, Jim Bilfz, Rick Waldenmayer. Bill 
Montfort, Dale Faulkner, Willie Jeffries, Harold White, Mike Lawson, Marc Kuhnhein, Dain 
Birkley, Coach Herrmann, Second Row: Mike McGraw, Bill Bradley, Tom Lloyd, Ricky Hill, 
Harry Reif, Allen Law , Victor Smith, Gary Carnan, Charles Hoffman, Trainer Bernie Sadosky, 
Third Row: Coach Homer Rice, Dick Zech, David Shearer, Fred Partin, Tim Slater, Bill Daley, 
Jerry Zint, Doug Moore, Bob Heinze, Doug McCammish, Doug Partin, Ed Rankin, Sterling 
Pratt, Gary Sheanshang, C. R. Lyons, Powell Smith. 



Highlands 48 — Dayton 
Highlands 54 — Lloyd 
Highlands 51 — Boone County 13 
Highlands 61— Bellevue 7 
Highlands 26 — Newport 12 
Highlands 49 — Bowling Green 6 



Highlands 34— Ashland 12 
Highlands 48 — Holmes 
Highlands 34— Campbell County 7 
Highlands 46 — Dixie Heights 7 
Highlands 34 — Hazard 
Highlands 12 — Madison 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
DECEMBER ISBI 




TRINITY'S STATE CHAMPIONSHIP CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 




The 1961 Cross Country 

The Trinity High School of Louisville won the 
ninth official K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, which 
was held in Lexington on November 11. The team 
score was 57. First place was won by Jim Gallagher 
of the Lexington Catholic High School, with the time 
of 10:04.1. This was a new record. The next eleven 
runners in the 129-man field also broke the old record. 

Scores of the ten full teams which qualified for 
the state run were as follows: Trinity, 57; Madison 
Central, 95; St. Xavier, 175; Taylor County, 177; Som- 
erset, 180; Fern Creek, 188; Butler, 202; Glendale, 279; 
Flat Gap, 282; St. Joe, 285. 

The State Cross Country Run was held on the 
Picr.dome Golf Course, and was managed by Head 
Track Coach Bob Johnson of the University of Ken- 
tucky, assisted by E. G. Plummer, Freshman Track 
Coach at U. of K. Members of the University varsity 
and freshman track teams assisted the coaches. 

Eight regional runs had been held for the purpose 
of qualifying teams and individuals for the state event. 
These runs were held at Paducah, Bowling Green, 
Clarkson, Louisville, Bellevue, Lexington, and Paints- 
ville. In addition to the teams, several individual 
runners qualified as entrants for the state affair. 



Richard Kelty, 



The order in which the fifty minners finished is 
given below, including the times of the first twenty- 
five. 

1-J. Gallagher, Lex. Catholic (10:04.1); 2-Sears, 
Somerset (10:12); 3-Baker, Trinity (10:13); 4-MilIer, 
Somerset (10:14); 5-Bealmear, Trinity (10:20); 6- 
Brooks, Southern (10:21); 7-Marshall, Mad. Central 
(10:22); 8-Price, Mad. Central (10:23); 9-Groves, 
Seneca (10:24); 10-Kelty, Trinity (10:24.5); 11-Schniit, 
Trinity (10:25): 12-Dunson, Mad. Centi-al (10:26); 
13-Pack, Flat Gap (10:32); 14-Jones, St. Joe (10:33); 
15-Galati, Pern Creek (10:39); 16-GaIitzine, Eastern 
(10:40); 17-Davis, Pad. Tilghman (10:45); 18-Wolfe, 
Cov. Holmes (10:46)- 19-Eigel, St. Xavier (10:47); 
20-T. Gallagher, Lex. Catholic (10:48); 21-Beatty, 
Butler (10:49); 22-McMahan, Taylor Co., (10:50); 23- 
Ward, Mad. Central (10:51); 24-Fritz, Somerset 
(10:52); 25-Conlon, St. Xavier (10:53); 26-Ratchford, 
Fern Creek; 27-Willibey, Camargo; 28-Herbig, Trinity; 
29-Ryan, St. Joe; 30-Embry, Butler; 31-Noel, Fern 
Creek; 32-Cody, St. Xavier; 33-Perkins, Glendale; 34- 
Blake, Trinity; 35-Seaborne, Taylor Co.; 36-Vetter, 
St. Xavier; 37-Warren, Taylor Co.; 38- Fightmaster, 
Cov. Holmes; 39-Lawson, Butler; 40-Spillman, May- 
field; 41-Loy, Taylor Co.; 42-Williams, Taylor Co.; 
43-Gaynor, Hancock Co.; 44-Britton, Newport; 45- 
Smith, Mad. Central; 46-Quinn, Newport; 47- Hughes, 
Camargo; 48-Brown, Taylor Co., 49-Hall, Mad. 
Central; 50-Robinson, Newport. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1961 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions -Installment 1 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify 
any rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: The home squad is the first to come 
on the court for pre-game warm up and starts prac- 
ticing at the south basket, or divides and practices at 
both basinets. When the visiting team comes onto the 
court, it indicates it desires the south basket for its 
goal. 

Ruling: The visiting team has the privilege of 
basket choice for practice. It shall also use this 
chosen basket for the first half. If the home team is 
practicing at the basket preferred by the visitors when 
they come upon the court, the home team must I'e- 
linquish this basket to the visitors. 

2. Play: A6, a substitute, in reporting to the 
scorers prior to entering the game: (a) gives only 
his name; or (b) gives only his number; or (c) does 
not indicate the position he will play. 

Ruling: A6 should give both his name and num- 
ber in (a) and (b), but in (c) it is not necessary for 
a substitute to indicate the position he will play. 

3. Play: After B5 has been awarded the ball 
out of bounds for thi'ow-in following violation by 
team A, Bl requests a time-out which is granted. 
Must B5 throw in when play is resumed? 

Ruling: Yes. B5 is a designated player and he, 
or — his substitute, must make the throw-in. 

4. Play: (a) Scorers are not supplied with team 
A's squad list at least ten minutes before scheduled 
starting time; or (b) team A's five starting players 
are not designated at least three minutes before 
scheduled starting time. 

Ruling: Technical foul in either (a) or (b). If 
both (a) and (b) are violated, it is a technical foul 
for each violation. Team B is given its free throw or 
throws to start the game and then it is awarded the 
ball out of bounds at the center of the court for a 
throw-in. 

5. Play: During the second quarter A12, 
whose name is not on the squad list supplied scorers 
ten minutes before the game starting time, desires 
to enter the game as a substitute. During the half- 
time intermission, coach of team A supplements his 
squad list with the name of A13. 

Ruling: Technical foul for failure to include the 
name of A12 in the original squad list. This is a team 
foul and, therefore, after the penalty has been assess- 
ed, additional names may be added to the list without 
assessing additional technical fouls. The name of A13 
may be added to the list without additional penalty. 

6. Play: A6 or B6 has reported to the scorers 
and is entitled and ready to enter when: (a) Al 
travels; or (b) B2 violates the throw-in provisions; 
or (c) A3 causes ball to go out of bounds; or (d) A4 
violates the three-second rule; or (e) B5 commits 
basket interferenc. 

Ruling: As soon as the official indicates the 



ball is dead in (a), (b), (c), (d) or (e) the scorer 
shall sound his horn to indicate A6 or B6 is ready and 
entitled to enter. Then the official will stop the clock, 
after which he will beckon the substitute ready and 
entitled to enter. 

7. Play: AG has reported to the scorers and 
is ready and entitled to enter the game when Al 
causes the ball to go out of bounds. As A6 is being 
beckoned onto the court by the official after he has 
stopped the clock, A7 goes to the scorers to report. 

Ruling: Because A7 is not ready and entitled to 
enter when the violation occurred, he may not enter 
at this time unless a charged time-out is taken by 
either of the teams on the court. 

8. Play: Coach, substitute, manager or trainer, 
while on his bench, coaches, directs, encourages, in- 
structs or signals his team on the court while the ball 
is alive and play is in progress. 

Ruling: The acts of coaching, directing, en- 
coui'aging, instructing and signaling a team while 
the ball is in play are not violations of the Basketball 
Rules if these acts are not unsportsmanlike or if 
they do not tend to incite undesirable crowd reaction. 
The coach, substitutes and team attendants must, 
however, remain on or near and in front of bench 
while coaching or encouraging their team. They may 
not move along the sideline while play is in progress. 
If a coach, substitute or team attendant goes to the 
scorers' table he must not tarry on the way to or 
from, nor may he communicate with his players 
while play is in progress and he is away from the 
vicinity of the bench. The present basketball code 
provides coaches and team attendants ample legal 
opportunities to communicate with their team. 'The 
Rules Committee is insistent that the coach shall set 
an example of admirable conduct and officials ai-e 
instructed to penalize promptly, and without warn- 
ing, any conduct that is unsportsmanlike or tends 
to incite undesirable crowd reaction. 

9. Play: While ball is alive and play is in 
progress, coach of team A, who is on the bench, 
signals or calls for a time-out. 

Ruling: This is not a violation. However, official 
will not act on coach's request, but will call time-out 
only in rsponse to a request by a player at the proper 
time. 

10. Play: Al is preparing to attempt a free 
throw. A2, who stays on the court, goes to the side- 
line and his coach, who is on the bench, gives instruc- 
tions to him. 

Ruling: This is not a violation. However, the 
official must not permit this to affect his putting the 
ball in play promptly. 

11. Play: Jumper Al, at the center circle, has: 
(a) both feet; or (b) only one foot; or (c) neither 
foot touching or inside the jumping circle. 

Ruling: Legal position in (a) or (b). Violation 
(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



DECEMBER, 1961 



VOL. XXIV— No. 5 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexin^on, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFOKD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (1968-62). Louisville; Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63), Browder : Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-66). Danville: Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64), Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates Jl.OO Per Year 



•Aom the Commissioned s Cjffl 



tee 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1961 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the forth- 
coming 1962 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by the principals of K. H. S. A. A. member 
schools on ballots returned to the State Office before 
November 15. There were several ties in the voting 
for delegate and alternate. These ties were broken 
recently, with the delegatse and alternates involved 
being determined by lot. The names of the district rep- 
resentatives are as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) J. M. Martin, (2) John Robinson, (3) W. W. 
Chumbler. (4) Delton Dodds, (5) Odell Walker, (6) 
James W. Larmouth, (1) R. A. Belt, (8) William 
Longhurst, Jr., (9) Clifton Wilson, (10) H'Earl Evans, 
(11) Hoy R. Long, (12) George Claiborne, (13) Denzel 
Mefford, (14) W. O. Wan-en, Jr., (15) Charles S. 
Combs, (16) Wayne Ewing, (17) Woodrow Crum, 
(18) Harold E. Hunter, (19) L. J. T^vyman, (20) 
Ralph Clark, (21) John Burr, (22) Courtland Cox, 
(23) S. M. Matarazzo, (24) Garnis Martin, (25) 
Edward Q. Adams, (26) Foster Sanders, (27) T. T. 
Knight, (28) John Pace, (29) Willis G. Wells, (30) 
Richard Greenwell, (31) W. E. Bell, (32) W. C. Stevens, 
(33) Arthur Walsh, (34) Richard Bezold, (35) Donald 
Davis, (36) Tom L. Gabbard, (37) Richard Nichols, 
(38) Lou Cunningham, (39) Orville B. Hayes, (40) 
William B. Reed, (41) Marion Crowe, (42) Amos 
Black, (43) John Heber, (44) James B. Moore, (45) 
Warren Wainwright, (46) Preston Pan-ett, (47) Joe 
Harper, (48) Gilbert Samples, (49) David C. Jackson, 
(50) Charles Singleton, (51) Shelvie Fuson, (52) 
James L. Howard (53) H. E. Wright, (54) James 
Caudill, (55) George W. Cornett, (56) W. 0. Gabbard, 
(57) Virgil Osborne, (58) Denzil Halbert, (59) 
Russell Williamson, (60) Willis H. Conley, (61) Robert 
J. Crawford, (62) John Allen, (63) Jack Fultz, (64) 
H. R. Bowling. 

(1) Chester Caddas, (2) Don Stephenson, (3) 
Howard V. Reid, (4) William B. Miller, (5) Rex 
Smith, (6) Curtis Sherrell (7) Chester C. Redmon, (8) 
Howard GoiTell, (9) Wayne Willson, (10) Thomas 
Brantley, (11) L. D. Knight, (12) L. L. McGinnis, (13) 



William Case, (14) Bowman Davenport, (15) W. M. 
Arnold, (16) Kenneth iSidwell, (17) Raymond H. 
Herndon, (18) J. M. Vance, (19) Frank Terrell, (20) 
Edwin Steen, (21) E. E. Tate, (22) Reathel Goff, (23) 
Kenneth Riddle, (24) Bill Parrott, (25) Lyman T. 
Johnson, (26) H. D. Glenn, (27) J. C. Cantrell, (28) 
Rev. John Lenahan, (29) George Valentine, (30) 
Bruce Sweeney, (31) Ollie Howard, (32) Palmore 
Lyles, (33) Duncan Huey, (34) Charles L. Lett, (35) 
John Schaar, (36) Harold Miller, (37) Kelley B. 
Stanfield, (38) Jams Parsley, (39) Elza Whalen, 
(40) Joe E. Sabel, (41) Robert C. Hume, (42) Robert 
B. Turner, (43) Clyde T. Lassiter, (44) Roy N. Wal- 
ters, (45) Homer Proffitt, (46) Jack Johnson, (47) 
Edward B. Webb (48) Dave Fryrear, (49) J. W. 
Thui-man, (50) H. D. Tye, (51) Miss E. R. Ball, (52) 
Wendell Adkins, (53) Roy T. Reasor, (54) Paul 
Wright, (55) J. B. Goff, (56) Lando Lockard, (57) 
Jim Hutchens, (58) John Campbell, Jr., (59) Howard 
W. Wallen, (60) Paul Polly, (61) Calvin Hunt, (62) 
Warren Cooper, (63) Howard Shumate, (64) Webb 
Yov.ng. 



In Memoriam 

PAUL PERDUE 

Paul Perdue, 51, Trig-g County Hig-h 
School principal, died of a heart attack at his 
home in Cadiz on October 26, 1961. 

Mr. Perdue had been a high school educa- 
tor and football official in Western Kentucky 
for more than twenty years. Before he was 
appointed principal in 1958, he was football 
coadh and assistant superintendent of Trig'g 
County Schools. He had been director of the 
Veterans' Education Program at Murray 
State College for seven years. 

A native of Murray, Mr. Perdue was a 
graduate of Murray High School and State 
College. He had lettered in three sports at 
the high school, and in football at the college. 
He was vice president of the West Kentucky 
Administrators Club and a past president of 
the First District Education Association. 

At its next meeting following the death 
of Mr. Perdue, the Trigg County Board of 
Education named the newly created athletic 
field. Perdue Field, and planned a fitting 
dedication. The resolution concerning the 
naming of the field was adopted by the board 
after hearing a petition presented by a rep- 
resentative of the T.C.H.S. student body, 
who spoke on behalf of the higfh school stu- 
dents in favor of a fitting memorial to Mr. 
Perdue. 

GEORGE W. GILES 

George W. Giles, 57, Shelby County 
school superintendent for twenty one years, 
died in Shelbyville on October 25, 1961. 

Under Mr. Giles' administration, the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



Page Three 



EMINENCE— BLUESRASS EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




B. l.inds: 

B. Houston. W. Ua 

Charles Quertermou 



>n, 11. LinilsiH. Sei-.md Ko- 

enport. L. Smither^, Mgr. U. Holla 

, Ass't Coach William Arington. 



Shelby County school system had effected a 
major consolidation program, built up its 
transportation system, and maintained at- 
tendance levels that ranked the schools a- 
mong the top ten in the state. 

Born at Gratz in Henry County, Mr. Giles 
was a graduate of Southwestern College at 
Winfield, Kansas. He also attended Kentucky 
Wesleyan College and did postgraduate work 
at the University of Kentucky. He taught, 
coached basketball, and v/as principal at the 
Cropper High School for eight years before 
his first appointment as County superinten- 
dent. 

As a young man, Giles was a baseball 
player. He later organized and managed 
teams for several years in a tricounty league 
composed of teams in Shelby, Henry, and 
Oldham counties. He was a member of 
Cropper Methodist Church. 

State Tournament Information 
The 1962 State High School Basketball Tournament 
will be held in Freedom Hall, Louisville, on March 
14-17. The first session :s scheduled for Wednesday 
night. Three sessions will be held on Thursday, two 
on Friday, and two on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December the Com- 
missioner will send K.H.S.A.A. member schools forms 
which may be used in requesting passes to the tourna- 
ment. These forms may be returned on and after 
January 2. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at $10.00 (end 
bleacher seats), $16.00 (chair back seats and end box 
seats), and $20.00 (box seats at the side of the floor). 
The general sale of tickets (not school orders) will be 
conducted by State Tournament Tickets Sales, P. 0. 
Box 1173, Lexington. These orders should not be 
placed before February 1. The amount of 25^ should 



li 1 Hi';. B. Detwiler. 
li. Ma.son. L. Hollar, 
chrll Bailey, Coach 



be added to each remittance (not school order) to 
pay for postage and insurance charges. Orders mailed 
prior to February 1 will receive lower priority than 
those mailed on that date. 

Hotels, motels, and other lodging places in the 
Louisville area will begin taking reservations after 
the first of the year. The Housing Bui'eau of the 
Louisville Chamber of Commerce, will assist in secur- 
ing rooms for those who are unable to get lodging by 
writing directly to the places of their reference. Such 
requests should be addressed to Louisville Chamber 
of Commerce, Housing Bureau, Louisville, Kentucky. 
Rifle Marksmanship Committee 

The Rifle Marksmanship Committee met at the 
K. H. S. A. A. office on November 14, 1961. Members 
of the committee, appointed recently by Association 
President, W. H. Crowdus, are: Col. Leslie C. Blank- 
inship, M. M. I., Chainnan; Prin. James H. Powell, 
University High School; and Prin. R. L. Grider, Bryan 
Station High School. 

The Commissioner reported that the principals of 
twenty-eight schools had indicated that they would 
probably send teams to a state championship meet 
in rifle marksmanship. The schools involved were: 
Ashland, Bishop Brossart, Bryan Station, Buckhorn, 
Carr Creek, Centertown, Dorton, Estill County, Grant 
County, Guthrie, Kingdom Come, Knott County, 
Liberty, Male, Martin, M. C. Napier, M. M. I., Morgan 
County, Owensboro, St. Hemy, St. John, St. Joseph, 
Sandy Hook, Seneca, University, Western, Whites- 
burg, Wingo. Tentative plans for the proposed state 
meet, scheduled to be conducted in three sections on 
successive Saturdays in May, 1962, were discussed. 
Mason-Dixon Games 

High School track coaches will be interested in 
knowing that there will again be a high school division 
of the Mason-Dixon Games. The games are scheduled 
to be held on the fine indoor track in Freedom Hall, 
Louisville, on Saturday, February 17, 1962. The high 
school events will be the 70-yard dash, the mile run, 
and the mile relay. Further information can be obtain- 
ed by contacting Wayne Cooper, Shawnee High School, 
Louisville 12, Kentucky. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



MADISON— C.K.C. CHAMPION AND CLASS AA STATE RUNNER UP 




(l,eft lc> Kishli Kronl Ki.« : Mitr. Harrv I,awsi>n, Car 
Mike Blvthe. OorKe Ballew. Mgr. Hubert Eades. Msr. Jan 
Fox, Charles Brown, Robert Durbin. John Davidson, Jimi 
Howard. Don Smith, Ass't. Coach Jack Ison. Third Row 



rencil. William Sailer. Jerrv Coffei. Mike Bchzle.v. 
Lee. Second Kew : Asst. Coach Bob Pike. Arthur 
Congleton. Freddy Ballou. Jerry Congleton, Bobby 
Kidd. George Adams, Bobby Off'e 



Boslev. Conlev Congleton. Ben Robinson. Talbott Todd, David Rivers. Johnny Collins, Conrad Lo 
Ass't. Coach Jerry Boyd. Fourth Row: Earl Combs III, Monte Joe Lovell. Dale Carrier, Gary Congleton, Ke 
Woolum, Harry Long, Ike Norris, Barry Cox. 



LYNCH EAST MAIN— C.V.C. AND REGION IV CLASS A CHAMPION 








|^.'^4«! 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Shotton. Cornett, Hickey, Florek. R. ,Mc(.eort!e. I'onell, Webb, M. Hodge, 
Owens, Sconce. Halcomb. Second Row: Coach Mirac'e, Hightower, Robinson. Walters. Larry Flanary. Hagy, 
Lowell Flanarv, Jackson, Lewis, Pierce. Blevins. Moslev. Coach Scott. Third Row: Watts. T. McGeorge. Mor- 
gan, G. W. Woods, B. Woods, Graham, Tomlinson, J. Hodge, Zlamal, Walker, Johnson. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



Page Five 



Ky. D. G. W. S. News 

Chairman Kitty E. Rogers of Danville, Kentucky 
Division of Girls' and Women's Sports, reports much 
activity by the members of her organization. Excerpts 
from a recent letter written to the Commissioner by 
Miss Rogers follow: 

"This has been a good year, and with the financial 
aid given to us by your association, we feel that 
much progress has been ninde in our program. 

"In August, our first D. G. W. S. Workshop was 
held for women physical education teachers. This was 
a three day workshop at Morehead State College. 
Clinics were held in basketball, volleyball, gymnastics 
and track and field. 

"Otl;.er sports activities held last year were the 
high school girls' tennis tournament, a college archery 
telegraphic meet, soccer clinic and sports df.y for high 
school girls, track and field meets for high school 
girls, volleyball sports days, and several basketball 
clinics for high schoo and college age. 

"Surveys were made in tennis (college women), 
soccer (high school), speedball (high school), field 
hockey (high school), and basketball (high school) to 
determine the extent to which these sports were offer- 
ed for girls and women and specific needs regarding 
them. 

"Our state D. G. W. S. Handbook was revised and 
distributed as well as several hundred letters in an 
effort to reach all girls and women in Kentucky with 
our services. Over 200 new D. G. W. S. rule books and 
gruides have been purchased in the state since August 
1961. 

"Out state sports chairmen have been very active 
during the past year, and we are now increasing the 
number of our D. G. W. S. board to include a gym- 
nastics chairman and a representative from each of 
the school districts. 

"Thank you for the special help you are giving 
us through Betty Langley and her tennis committee, 
and Robye Anderson and the golf committee. As 
soon as our mailing list for 61-62 is complete, I shall 
send this to you. I believe that it would be helpful 
if information from your office concerning our tourna- 
ments were sent to these people. You may also wish 
to use this list when recruiting tournament officials, 
etc. . . . 

"Much of the work of this organization would be 
impossible without the financial assistance of KHSAA. 
We certainlv do aopreciate this." 

EARLY SEASON BASKETBALL 
(Continued from Page One) 
by Al in (c). 

12. Play: In a g<i,me played in quarters, the 
first extra period ends A60-Pe0. 

Ruling: A complete (three minute) second extra 
period is played. The team ahead in score at the end 
of any extra period wins. If the s'^ore is tied at the 
end of an extra period, another extra period is play- 
ed after a one-minute intei-mission. As many addi- 
tional three-minute periods as are necessary to break 
the tie shall be played. The game ends when the 
score is not tied at the end of any overtime period. 

13. Play: In a high school game, the first 
extra period ends A60-B60. A2 secures center tap and 
immediately scores a field goal. 

Ruling: Game is not over. The entire three 
minutes of the second overtime shall be played. If 
either team is ahead at end of the second overtime, 
it is the winner. 

14. Play:Coach of team A or B while on or in 
the vicinity of his bench disrespectfully: (a) address- 



es an official; or (b) addresses a player of the 
opponent; or (c) shows disappi-oval of an official's 
decision by gesturing or tossing a towel in the air or 
to the floor. 

Ruling: Technical foul in (a), (b) and (c). 
Official must penalize any coach or team attendant 
promptly and without warning for each of these 
actions. 

15. Play: Jumper Al takes a hop in prepara- 
tion for his jump to tap a ball tossed by an official. 

Ruling: Legal, providing at least part of one 
of his feet is touching the jump circle when the ball 
is tossed. 

16. Play: Dribbler Al flagrantly charges Bl. 
It is his third personal foul. 

Ruling: Al is disqualified and since this is not 
a common foul, Bl is awarded two free throws. 

17. Play: While Al is dribbling, A2 holds B2. 
It is team A's seventh foul during the half. 

Ruling: Foul is charged to A2. No free throws 
are awarded. Team B is awarded the ball out of 
bounds at spot nearest the foul. 

18. Play: Dribbler Al charges Bl. At approxi- 
mately the same time, B2 holds A2. Both fouls are 
common fouls. 

Ruling: False double foul. Al and B2 are each 
charged with a personal foul. A2 is awarded the 
numbsr of free throws due him because of the foul 
by B2. Because the foul by Al was a common foul 
committed while a member of his team was in con- 
trol of the ball, Bl is not given a free throw. The ball 
is put in play by a jump at the center circle following 
the free throw or throws by A2. 

19. Play: Coach of team A uses hand mega- 
phone or public address microphone to coach or call 
encouragement to his players. 

Ruling: Technical foul. This is considered an 
unsportsmanlike tactic and is not permissible. 

20. Play: How close must coach stay to his 
bench when calling instructions or encouragement to 
his team? 

Ruling: A coach must stay in the vicinity of his 
bench during the course of the contest except, of 
course, if he goes to the scorers' table to secure in- 
formation or if he is permitted by an official to enter 
the court. If the coach does go to the scorers' table to 
secure information, it is expected that he will return 
to his bench promptly after receiving it. The coach 
should not be permitted to walk up and down the 
sideline. Under ordinary circumstances, he is requir- 
ed to remain on or at his team's bench. Leaving the 
bench to call instructions or to coach or to encourage 
his team is interpreted as unsportsmanlike, or action 
which would tend to incite undesirable crowd reaction 
and thereby constitutes a technical foul. 

21. Play: Bl is the last to touch the ball be- 
fore it goes out of bounds at the end of the court 
near the corner. Official awards the ball to Al at 
the out of bounds spot. A2 steps out of bounds at the 
side of the court near the corner and Al passes the 
ball in fUght across the corner to A2, who returns 
the ball to Al in time to permit Al to pass to A3, who 
is in the court. The entire action takes less than five 
seconds. 

Ruling: Technical foul. A2 has left the court 
for an unauthorized reason. 

22. Play: Bl and B2 simultaneously hold Al, 
who has the ball and is attempting to pass. 

Ruling: Multiple foul. Al is awarded two free 
throws and both Bl and B2 are charged with a 
personal foul. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



The Flying Dutchman 

Attention, basketball officials and 
coaches! Attach these rulings to your rule 
books : 

1. Because our officials and coaches were 
concerned that the new substitution rule 
would cause trouble when play was resumed 
after the substitution by a throw-in from 
out-of-bounds in the back court where 
officials are not required to handle the ball 
ordinarily, I called on Cliff Fag-an for a rul- 
ing. Cliff recommends that officials handle 
the ball after each occasion where the clock 
is stopped following a violation to permit a 
substitution. This includes the back court 
also. 

2. The official sees Al, wlho does not have 
the ball, foul B2. He is not sure whether A2 
was in control of the ball when the foul 
occurred. How should he rule? Ruling: If 
he is not sure A2 was in control, then he 
must rule that A2 was not in control. The 
official, calling the foul, must determine 
v/here the ball is at the time the foul is 
called. 

3. Uncle Sam has relocated official Bill 
Ring, who was always a regular at the 
Morehead clinics, at Fort L<^onard Wood, 
Missouri. The whole Fort is in an uproar 
about the following play and asked the 
Dutchman to rule quickly to prevent a 
"Shooting War": 

Bl scores a field goal or free throw. Al 
gets ball out of bounds. A2 comes out of 
bounds behind B's end line and gets the 
ball from Al. Then Al goes on the playing 
floor and receives a pass from A2. Is this a 

legal play? Ruling: It certainly is but 

only after a successful field goal or free 
throw and as long as all of this action is 
completed in five (5) seconds. 

4. Attention, Coaches! When an official 
stops the clock after a violation to pennit 
a substitution, you must send your substitute 
into the game immediately or have a techni- 
cal foul called on you for delaying the game. 
The official has no choice; he must call the 
technical foul. "Nuff sed." 

Glen E. Major of Somerset wants to know 
the last year the center jump was used after 
eaoh field goal. Answer: In 1935 the center 
jump after the successful free throw was 
eliminated and in 1937 all center jumps 
after any successful goals were done away 
with. 

Valley Station's Don Babbage, one of 
Jeffei'son County's best hardwood officials, 
is now traveling Western Kentucky. His 




David Wood 

whistle will be missed because he knows 
how to blow and when. 

The Falls Cities Basketball Officials' 
Association does a fine job in its area. Much 
credit goes to the officers : Otis Roller, Presi- 
dent ; Jim King, Vice-President ; Norman 
Lankert, Secretary ; and "Good ole Barney 
Claude" Ri;ketts, the scheduling agent. The 
Board of Directors is a distinguished group 
of gentlemen composed of Bill Small, Jim 
Huter, Bill Long, Earl Driskell, and Bob St. 
Clair. Incidentally, Otis Roller is one of 
"Nature's Noblemen." 

John Heldman, Jr., who earns his daily 
bread by running the P. E. Department at 
U of L and his weekly dessert by officiating 
basketball, wins the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
for November. Here is why: 

When Earl Driskell's car broke down 
half way between Louisville and Indianapolis 
on an officating trip, "Jolly John" drove his 
car fifty miles from Louisville at two hours 
after midnight to tow Earl's car back to the 
big city. A man who will get out of his bed 
at 2:00 A.M. to render such unselfish ser- 
vice deserves a twist of long, green tobacco 
to boot. If you will smoke it, John, I will 
send it. 

Wood L. Gardner, Park City's progressive 
principal, recommends David Wood for the 
honor of Game Guy of 1961-62. Wood Gard- 
ner gets the Dutchman's salute for taking 
an interest in this kid. Hardly able to walk 
because of an irritated foot condition, this 
Game Guy candidate insisted on playing like 
the other boys - - - but he is happier now 
because his principal has a doctor helping 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



Page Seven 



him. Kentuckians are great people! 

George Weinstein, a writer for "THIS 
WEEK," came to Kentucky from New 
Jersey this month to write a story about 
the' flying DUTCHMAN AWARDS. 
"THIS WEEK" services major newspapers 
which accumulate a circulation of eleven 
million (11,000,000). 

It is time now for the Dutchman to wish 
all of his friends all over Kentucky a 
MERRY CHRISTMAS. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List ComnilH l)°ce'^be'- 1") 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the frist number is that of the home phone. 

Abbott. Graham L.. 105 Broadhurst Drive, Wilmore 

Adair, Lewis C. 4911 Ronwood Dr., Louisville, EM 6-2992, 

JU 7-7471 
Allen, Ed L.. Transylvania College. Lexington, 4-1887, 2-9148 
Allen. Jack R.. Route 3, Bardstown, FI 8-8294, FI 8-3227 
Allen, James D.. Martin 

Allen. James W.. 3444 Monel Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Aubin, Gene, 319 South 7th Street, Mayfield, 326-3990, CH 7-3913 
Austin. Samuel H., Calhoun. BR 3-3223, BR 3-3948 
Baker, James E.. 205 Highland Ave., Monticello. 348-G581. 

348-2331 
Baker. Roger L., 1901 Port Royal Court. Lexington. 7-7839 
Baskin, Sylvester. 214 West Street, Lynch, 84S-5637 
Beaslev, Donald. Box 112, Dunnville 
Beglev, Berlie B., Jr., 5314-D Gardner Ave., Fort Knox. 4-1255 

(Bus.) 
Bentley, Bill. 1908 North Street, Ashland. 32.5-2613 
Berrv, Patrick H., c/o Southern Bell Tel. Co., 422 Frederica, 

Owensboro, 895-5554, 451-6016 
Bickers, Homer G., 172 Winding Way, Frankfort, 3-0253 
Bishop, Heulvn, 1910 Eastern Ave., Covington. CO 1-3642 
Black. Ronald Eugene, Armed Forces Examining Sta., Box 

176, Ft. Thomas. HI 1-2410. HI 1-2412 
Bradford, Earl E., Glasgow High School. Glasgow 
Brant, Bernard. High Street, Danville, 236-5766 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington. 2-0954, 2-3212 
Brovles, Bobby, 315 Mulberry. Hartford. CY 8-3859 
Burkett, Garvis, Nancy, 871-3236, 678-4942 
Butcher. Clifford. Route 40. Williamsport 
Butler, Donald A.. 2505 Iroquois Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-3175, 

MU 4-1451 
Byon. Lou's S.. Jr.. 1317 Lexington Road. Louisville, JU 3-0337 
Canady, Ray B.. 227 Sycamore St., Bai-bourville, LI 6-3601, 

LI 6-3164 
Caple. Harold. 318 Poplar St.. Ludlow, AX 1-6491 
Carrithers. Calvin, 1813 Millgate, Anchorage, CH 5-0061, 

CH 5-4131 
Cartee, Kaloh. Jr., Olive Hill, 326-6821 
Cassady, Charles W., 1127 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, 

yl 3-9638 
Caster, Bovd J. Jr.. Sheraton Hotel. Louisville, JU 4-1765 
Cecil, Jo>'n C Jr., 1210 South Green St.. Glasgow. OL 1-2410. 

OL 1-2007 
Chapman, James S., Box 4. Ragland, W. Va. 
Clare, Dennis M,. 2333 Saratoga, Lou-'sville. GL 8-3055 
Clary, Kenneth. 17 North Alves St., Hendcr.son, VA 7-3320 
Collins, Keith, Smithsboro, MI 2-3451 
Colvin, Paul F., 826 West Lee Street, Mayfield, 247-6959, 

247-3913 
Combs. Harvey M., Jeff, 6-3401 

Crosbie, Ronald L., Box 84. McRoberts. Jenkins 243 (Bus.) 
Current, ElUs. Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Dr.. Lexington, 7-1049, 

5-4660 
Daugherty, L. B„ 1200 Main Street, Murray 
Davenport. Robert B., Shakertown Road, Burgin, 748-5204, 

748-5180 
Davis, Clifford, Calvin, ED 7-3623, ED 7-3623 
Deim, Martin F.. Route 4. Box 795, Anchorage, CH 5-5969, 

TW 5-0567 
Denekas, Raymond D., Annville. 4-2661, 4-2666 
Devine, Robert Earl, Sacramento. 736-2836, 843-9271 
Dolan, Michael B., Jr.. 168 Lincoln Ave., Lexington 6-4034, 

2-0619 
Donaldson. Ken W., 1201 Hill Street, Paducah, 442-1570, 443- 

2476 
Donovan, Edgar A.. 2025 Oak Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-4756 
Duff. Birchel. Garrett 

Dutton, Henly C, Williamsport, 789-4717, 789-5050 
Dykes, Lai-ry. 232 Hai-ding, Danville. 236-5853 
Earles, Charles E., 555 Moreland, Harrodsburg, 734-4797 
Evans. James "Bug Dusf, Auxier, TU 6-2072 
Fandrich, William, Route 4, Murray. PL 3-3193, PL 3-3193 



Farlee. Harold "Butch", 2720 Field Ave.. Louisville 6. TW 

3-3201 
Farmer, Clay John "Jack", Methodist Home, Vei-sailles, TR 

3-4481, TR 3-4481 
Ferrell, Jimmy, 219 Cedar Street, Glasgow, DL 1-3661 
Fields, Jerry J.. 709 Main St.. Hartford, CY 8-3466. CY 8-3221 
Fisher, George D., APSC, Box 2004, Clarksville, Tenn., MI 

7-1908. MI 7-1873 
Fisher, Larry J., Wurtland. 836-5530, 324-1155 ext. 323 
Fly, Edward Lynn, Box 1270, Murray College, Murray, PL 

3-9194 
Frasure. Lois E., Langley, BU 5-3346 (Bus.) 
Frazer, Tom Roe. 20 Senate Ave.. Morganfield, 182, 222 
Frye. Gilbert Lee. 524 Hiawatha Trail, Frankfort, 3-5117, 7-2231 



295 



-5754, 



Gibson, Kenneth L,, 1118 Lillian Ave., Louisvil 

JU 7-1121 Ext. 309 
Oilman, Ronald. Delbarton. W, Va. 
Godbev, Truman, Middleburg. 787-4013, 787-2852 
Goodin, Shirley G., Box 143, Pineville, ED 7-2284, ED 7-2435 
Goodlett, Thomas Edward, 136 E, Maxwell, Lexington, AL 

2-4931 
Grace, H. E.. Jr.. Middlesboro, 4 

Green, Jerry L., 431 Bamberger Road, Lexington. 3-1506, 4-7847 
Greer, Jim, 536 Kelly Street. Harlan, 2233 

Grisham, Je.sse R., 1527 Roosevelt St., Henderson. VA 7-1035 
Gross, Garrett, Harlan, 2159 
Gomm, Kenneth E., 7304 Edenderry Lane. Louisville, 969-7335, 

GL 4-7511 ext. 559 
Hale. John, Route 1, Box 118, Baxter, 2131. 4W 
Hall. .John R., Coeburn, Virginia 

Hammons. Norman, Route 4, Hopkinsville, TU 5-5914 
Harrell, Bill D.. Webbmont, Shelbyville. ME 3-4601, ME 3-2344 
Harris. Gene, Route 2, Box 113, Corbin, 2724 (Bus,) 
Harris, Jack Q., Colonial Hotel. Berea 
Hatter, William F.. 4211 LaFayette Court, Erlanger. DI 1-6139, 

MA 1-6491 
Henderson, George Robert, 531 Manchester. Barbourville, 

LI 6-4129 (Bus. I 
Haynes. John, 416 Clav St.. Henderson, VA 7-5137 
Heitzman, Don L., 3616 Lincoln Ave., Covington. HE 1-1239, 

HE 1-0462 
Henderson. James H,. 150 North Bend Road, Hebron. 689-4661, 

283-6501 
Higdon, Jack H., 51-C Lee Village, Ft. Campbell. GE 9-4354. 

4280 
Hinkle, Melvin B., 21 Cameron St., Paris, 1343, 220 
Hobbs. Charles V., 627 Westview, Ashland, 324-9439, 324-2175 
Hopkins, Donald. Route 1. Island, 736-2656, 843-9271 
Howard, Orville Ray, 108 Woodlawn, LaGrange. CH 1-4523, 

BR 9-5269 
Hughes, Paul P., 644 South Limestone St., Lexington. 2-2678 
Hughes Robert E.. 400 Briggs Ave., Russellville. PA 6-6334, 

PA 6-6335 
Idol. Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Rd., Middlesboro. 397 
Irwin, Don, 59 Black Oaks, Paducah, 442-1597. 443-4521 
.Jellison. Alvin C, M/Sgt., Officers Open Mess. Ft. Knox. 

4-2788, 4-4397 
Johnson, Jack D.. McKinney. 346-3856. 346-2611 
Jones, Earl E.. 1420 Carter Ave,. Ashland. 325-3725, Ironton. 

Ohio JE 2-3911 
Kaopes, Keith R., 229 33rd St., Ashland, 324-8490 
Kidwell. James S„ 1112 Parkway. Covington, JU 1-9141 
King, Bob, 119 South 39th St., Louisville, SP 8-4660. SP 8-2762 

ext. 289 
Kingrey. Paul R., 105 Claburn. Glasgow. OL 2-3811 (Bus.) 
Knotts, Franklin D.. L Troop. 6th A/C, Ft. Knox. 4-2594, 4-5612 
Kuster, William, 533 17th Street, Tell City, Indiana 
Lanham. Durward, Route 1. Winchester. PI 4-6773. PL 4-4834 
Leahy, Patrick, 1819 Rateliffe, Louisville. SP 6-6368. JU 7-1121 

ext. 472 
Lee, Rev. Charles Howard. Main Stl'eet. Route A-1. Manches- 
ter. Ohio, 549-3483. 549-3483 
LeQuire, Harold M., Box 608, Harlan, n23-J, 2600 
Lester, J. L., Georgetown, 601 
Little, James G., Lookout, SK 4-8377 

Logue. Ronald G., 514 Maple Ave.. Danville. 236-3580, 236-2676 
Lykins. Ronald, Morehead St, College, Box 60, Morehead, ST 

4-9095 
McAlister, Ronald D., 410 Carr, Fulton. 1104-J 
McBride. Donald R., 1663 Strader Drvie. Lexington. 5-2153, 

4-6610 
McClure, William Scott. 404 College St., London, 864-5669. 

864-2255 
McCormick, Lester E.. Auburn. LI 2-7458 
McDonald, Charles W.. 919 Elm Street. Bowling Green. VI 

3-3516 (Bus. I 
McGuire, Jack. 229 North 17th St., Louisville 
Mann. L, Mac, P. O. Box 133. Greenville. TU 6-7500, 259 
Markley. George. 6120 Tulane Road, Box 13, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

RE 1-0229. SY 1-1680 
Maxwell, Harry Edward, Jr., 722 South 9th Street. Paducah, 

443-4628, 442-2711 
Mazzara, Edward, 1720 Winding Way, Owensboro. MU 4-1259, 

MU 3-1561 
Meadows, Marvin, Clayhole 
Meek, Walter, Williamsport 
Meiman, William A., 1700 Deer Park Ave., Louisville. GL 1-4596. 

JU 7-6897 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



PADUCAH TiLGHMAN— REGION I CLASS AA CHAMPION 















mmm. IP^^^^Mt^ 



(Left to Rieht) Front Riiw: Bobby Troutman, Phil Bryant. Rick Largey 
Stiller. Phil Mengel, (iarv Overton. Robert Rose, Tom Morgan. Tommy Thomas. 
r: Larry Treece. Louis Michelson. Jim Davis, Jim Humphrey. Kenny Hill. Mike 
oM Keller. John Marshall. Steve Marshall, AI Todini, Ronnie Lemon. Third Row 
les, Dan Cannon, Jerry SoUitto, Charles Saladino, Terry Croom. Ken Armstrong. 

Ed Thomas, Martin Johnson, Johnnie Baker. Fourth Row: Larry Burkhart, Mik^ 
;e Benefiel. Ken Roberts. Bobby Ayers, Hal Brown, Jerry Blevins, Bill Haley 
■ris, David Boyd. Fifth Row: Dick Shelbourne, Terry McRight, Allen Lovd, Jame 
lensker. Ken Miller. Virsil Winnett. Robert Foster. Jerry Paschall, George Robertson 
v: Charles Lowery, Ray Moore, Preston Shoup, Frank Rasche, Jim Funk. 

SHELBYVILLE— REGION II CLASS A CHAMPION 



Id Wagner, Phillip Nichols, 

las, Alben Barkley. Second 

dford, John Hartline, 

Billy Brower, Wendel 

1 Wright, Billy Black, 



McGini 


nis. 


Don V 


eatch. 


Clyde 


Trevathan, 


Don 


Lynn, 


Doi 


1 Lee, 


Leslie 


son, Di 


ivid 


Shauf. 


Sixth 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Allen Wells, Charles Bradbury. Allan Long. Eddie Davis. Nelson Beatty. Phil 
Tingle. Mike Puckett. Mike Saunders, Coach Richard Greenwell, Ass't. Coach Allie Kays. Second Row: Foley 
Bustle. John Hackworth, Donald Crutcher, Dennis Morton, Diclt Edwards, Eddie Bradford, Hitc Hays, Joe 
Tinnell, Ass't. Coach Herbie Kays. Third Row: Charlie Davis, Mike Catlett, Richard Greenwell, Mike Craw- 
ford, •■Ro'-ky" Nelson, Larry Hughes, Pat Ballard, Lynn Swiggert, Tommy Thompson, Ass't. Coach Jack Rob- 
erts. Fourth Row: Jerry Gordon, Scotty GHIock, Gene Wells, Lester Ray, Steve Radcliffe, Sam Scearce, John 
Harrod. Jerry Tracy, Mac McGinnis. Fifth Row: Ronnie Yount, Jerald Fox. Larrv Louden. Tommy Bemiss, 
Lee Allen McGinnis, Bob Carter, Melvin Dorsev, Eddie Frazier, Jess Settle, Butch McBride. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



Page Nine 



HA-7ARn_EK MC. AND REGION IV CLASS AA CHAMPION 

f r ^ ,?. r C ^ 





(Lel£ to RiEht) Front Kow : J. Nunn. G. Foats, S. 1 
son. R. Lindon. C. Williams, J. Vermillion. Second Roi 
C. Joseph, E. Stacv. J. Stone. A. .1. Davis. B. Pigmai 
Ion, K. Tate. L. Pennington. C. Duff, R. Perkins. B. Gi 
Engle. F. Thomas. E. McAfee, J. Robinson, D. Francis 



St., Bo 



472, Haibourville 



Willi: 



GE 



Mendler, Ronald H.. Maiicheste 

LI 6-4129 (Bus.) 
Messerian. Nishan. 175 East 3rd 

BE 5-3023. 393-3200 
Miles. Francis M.. 1142 South 36th St., Louisville 11. SP 6-2331 
Miller. Rodney Don. Box 31, Asbury College, Wilmore 
Mills, Gilbert James, 324 W. Washington, Hartford, CY 8-3123 
Miracle, Ed, Box 998, Lynch, 848-2326. 848-5486 
Mitchell. Billy, 108 Woodlawn. LaGrange, BR 9-5253. BR 9-5269 
Monel. Ross, 302 North St.. Murray, PL 3-2727 
Moore, Arnold D.. 2017 Winchester Ave.. Ashland 
Morgan. Tom. 207 Maplemere Drive, Clarksville, Tenn. 
Mount. Gary. Transylvania College. Lexington 
Nail, James H., Box 155. Rumsey. BR 3-3947 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6257 
Newsom, Marley, 109 Division St., Pikeville, GE 7-6782 
Noble, Clarence Arnett, Hill St. (415). Box 528. Morehe, 

6-4630 
Oaks, Gary, 60414 South Green St.. Glasgow. OL 1-2136 (Bus.) 
Owen. Harry E.. 116 Louisiana Ave.. Lexington. 6-8644, 2-8166 
Owens, Homer A.. 206 Division St.. Pikeville. GE 7-4595. 

GE 7-4051 
Owens. R. L.. Jr.. 302 19th St.. Corbin, 69'>J. 1124 
Pardue, Bob. 221 Shelley. Glasgow. OL 1-2456 
Pelphrey. Jack. Box 54, Paintsville, 9-4206 
Pennell, Donald G.. Box 682. Burdine, Jenkins UO-R 
Peters, Arthur. Keavy 

Peters. Harold Dean. Box 27. Martin. 5-3533 
Ponder, Paul, Box 124, Livingston, 453-2662. 453-9061 
Porter. Albert Clark. Morgantown. LA 6-5141 
Prewitt, Allan, Lancaster, 792-2024, 548-2631 
PuUen. Edward S.. 307 Wright. Mayfield, CH 7-6768, OH 7-2734 
Pursifull, Cleophus, 80S Dorchester Ave.. Middlesboro. 2208 
Raisor, J. T.. 990 Fredericksburg Rd.. Lexington. 7-1043. 4-0304 
Rail, Eugene, 105 Reservoir Rd., Frankfort, CA 7-2355, CA 

7-2231 ext. 202 
Rawlings. Charles. 626 Diecks Dr.. Elizabethtown, RO 5-2529, 

RO 5-5237 
Ricketts, Claude O., 10217 Starlight Way, Valley Station, WE 

7-8610. ME 4-1551 ext. 220 
Riggs, Morgan E.. 1702 Larkmoor. Louisville. GL 8-6240 
Ritchie. Oscar. Jr.. 96''5 Ind. Schools Rd., Fern Creek. CE 

9-8597. JU 2-2431 
Rose, Wally, 623 Southridge. Lexington. 2-7255 
Rosenbaum. Robert L., 117 Fairlawn Road. Louisville. TW 

7-2833, JU 4-8191 
Saturley, David, Route 6. Hopkinsville. TU 5-8395. TU 5-5301 

ext 20 
Schmidt, Frank L.. 13''9 Hull St.. Louisville, JU 4-6421 
Scott, Bill, Box 1055. Lynch. 848-5484, 848-5486 
Scott, Clarence T.. Box 121. Wallins Creek. MO 4-2181, MO 

4-3444 
Seale, William E., 1001 Tates Creek Road. Lexington. 6-8545. 

2-2200 ext. 3329 
Sellied, Ed, 135 Hamilton Park, Lexington 
Short, Eugene. Crum. W. Va. 

Shumate. Fred R.. 122 Glover, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-5466 
Spaulding. Stan. 434 Gordon Ave.. Waverly. Ohio. 816-M, 51 
Stamper, Paul, Grassy Creek, SH 3-3612, SH 3-4275 
Staton, Jimmie F., Tollesboro 



Lindon. B. Kidd. S. Smilh, L. Caudill. W. Philon. David- 
v: D. Bailev. D. Bailev. J. Pigman. D. Sinor. E. Bellis. 
1. Third Row: R. Spiker. T. Asburv. R. Cecil. A. Hol- 
reen. C. Pankey. Fourth Row: Mgr. A. Pankey. Mgr. B. 
i. Mgr. J. Hall. 

Steely. Stanley E.. Mt. Ash. HE 4-N318 

Stephens. Herbert D.. 133 1st St.. West. Ceredo. W. Va. 

Stevens. Alex. Centre College. Danville 

Stith. Houston. Route 2, Box 93. Elizabethtown, RO 5-4737. 

RO 5-6957 
Stokes, Tommy Grant, Route 3, Malisonville, RE 6-2741, 1-617B 
Stone, Doyle Clayton, 109 Moundale, Winchester, 744-2198 
Sutfin, Joe, ir24 Sunset Dr., Clarksville, Tenn. 
Sutton, Charles W.. 2401 Topeka Dr.. Lexington, 7-2131, 2-9469 
Sutton, Evans A., Andei-son Court No. 12, Paducah 
Swope, William W., 438 Price Road. Lexington. 5-2458 
Tackett, Layne. 8171,:. East Main St.. Greenup. 473-6921, 836- 

5931 
Tarvin. Roger Wayne. 13 Woodland, Ft. Thomas. HI 1-1232, 

LO 1-7276 
Taylor. Hal, 9802 Orlandi Court. .leffersontown. AN 7-6764, 

GL 1-4330 
Taylor. James R., 429 Robertson. Lexington. 4-7271 
Taylor. Rogers E.. Route 1. Grandview Dr.. Owensboro, MU 

4-6992. MU 4-5201 
Tharpe. Robert L.. 212 Spruce. Murray. PL 3-4671, PL 3-9174 
Tinsley. Earl. 536 Donivan. Princeton. EM 5-5133 
Todd. Paul H.. 120 Lyons Ave., Morehead, ST 4552, Hillsboro 

TR 6-2496 
Tolman. William Allen. Jr.. 239 Tahoma Dr., Lexington, 7-4591 
ToUe. Lewis D.. 225 North Church. Cynthiana. 1436. 235 
Toy. Eddie N.. 436 Vista Court. Mt. Sterling, 186, 7 
Trepus, Willard F.. Route 1. Box 288. Jackson 
Vance, Earl G.. 304 Norris Court. Glasgow. OL 1-3083, OL 

1-5205 
Varble. Wil'iam. 1705 Cvpre.ss St., Louisville. SP 5-6712, SP 

2-3621 
Walsh. Herschel N.. 1223 Indianola. Bowling Green. Madison- 

ville. TA 1-5526. VI 3-3796 
Walton. Roy. 236 Dartmouth. Lexington. 7-2241, 7-5122 
Wanchic. Nick, Route 6 Berea Road, Lexington. 5-1233, 2-8328 
Ward. Sam Clay. Route 3, Lexington. 4-5536. 4-1877 
Warren. Kenneth A.. 45 Meadowview Dr.. Louisville 20. GL 

4-5001, ME 4-1551 ext. 258 
Webb, Jerry, 306 Wilson Ave.. Auburn 
Welch. Henry Clark. 301 Maxville. Stanford. FO 5-5263, FO 

5-2337 
Welch, J. D., 3201 Hampton St.. Ashland. 324-3337. 324-5503 

ext. 369 
Wells. Fred. Route 2, Gravson. 474-5065 
West. Art F.. 1705 Carolyn Dr.. Lexington. 6-6711 
Weyer, James. 224 East 12th Street. Covington. HE 1-1096, 

CO 1-6400 
Whitt. John. Box 612. Russell, 836-5966 
Whittemore, Paul F., North Arnold St., Prestonsburg, TU 

6-6381, TU 6-2680 
Willis. Robert A., 234 South 25th St.. Louisville, SP 8-6526, 

JU 5-2251 ext. 282 
Wilson. Fred L., Box 34. Trenton. Ohio, YU 8-6926, GA 3-0731 
Wirtz. Leonard. 4439 Reading Road. Cincinnati 29. Ohio, 931- 

1468. 631-0711 
Withrow. Raymond. 424 Res. Ave.. Central City, 742-W 
Woods. James W., 1133 Avondale Road. Owensboro. MU 4-1789, 

MU 3-2401 
Wright. Paul. Mulberry. Hazard. GE 6-4277. GE 6-4721 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



BELLEVUE— REGION 



CLASS A CHAMPION 




cl.ifl t,. K.thti I ront K(,« Ken Vlvx.indir Norb Wormald, Jim (a^ana. Jerri (has 
Dick Overman. Bob Turner. Kav Henschen. Bob Williams, Tom Fowee. Second Row: Jim Demler, Herb Stodg- 
hill. Rickv Pitzer, Jerry Johnson. Jim Jones. Danny Lapham. Charles Sipple. Daye Smith. Fred Bryant, Dave 
Chase. Third Row: Bruce Faijalev. GregK Schulte. Ken Spivev, Ken Simms, Jack Schwab, Tom Gauspohl, 
Harold Mattox, Gil Laake, Mike Swauger. 

BELL COUNTY— SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 



.« ,.^ - : -''' // '■«'#., ^ lu^ hx^ ,r^ ), 



Jl 



41 i 83* -s-^-s^ 12, 







(Lett to Right) Front Ko» : Oiid K.ikir. Et.ilpli Wo 
Pursifull, Jr., Orville l.awson. Jack Savior. Second Ko« 
.\lfred Howard, Luther Tavlor, John Messer, William Mil 
.Vss't. Coach Vernon Owens Third Row : Coach Clecphus 
Ronald D. Miracle, Jimmv Elliott, Ainn/o llendrukson 
Virgil Johnson, Prin. James A. Pursifull. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Comniled DeceTiber 1") 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
nombers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Ashworth, Fred G.. 533 Fourth Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 

Detenber. Gene. 229 Tyne Road. Louisville, TW 5-7068 

Dixie. Cornelius P., 608 South Clay St., Louisville, JU 7-7680, 

EM e-9561 
Fey. Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-6288, KI 1-1800 

E.xt. 433 
Fields, Jerry J., 709 Main St.. Hartford. CY S-3456, CY 8-3221 
Grace, H. E.. Jr., Middlesboro. 4 
Hicks. Lloyd, 3747 Shadv Lane, North Bend, Ohio, WI 1-0396, 

WI 1-5973 
JosephiS, Michael. Marshall University, Huntington. W. Va. 
Malcolm, Donald C, 533 Fourth Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Noble. Clarence Arnett. Hill St. (4151. Box 623. Morehead. 

GE 6-4630 
Whittemore. Paul F.. North Arnold St., Prestonsburg, TU 

6-6381, TU 6-2680 



Is. Charles Howard. Johnny Helton. Jim Tve, Cleophus 
Weaver Greene, Walter Knuckles, Donald Hens'.ey, 
cle, Clofus Barnett, Arene Meredith. David Greene, 
'ursifull. Glen Norton, John Stanley, Eugene Burnett, 
Jr.. Buddy Thomas. Ronald Christian, Freeman Clark, 



New Publications 

The Administration of 
High School Athletic Events 

The Interstate Printers of Danville, Ill- 
inois, announce a new manual, The Admin- 
istration of High School Athletic Events, by- 
William A. Healey, Professor of Physical Ed- 
ucation, Northern Illinois University. The 
handbook, which lists at $5.75 less educa- 
tional discount, will be useful to those con- 
cei-ned with the responsibility for planning 
and conducting athletic events. It is filled 
with practical, concrete, down-to-earth ad- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



Page Eleven 



ELIZABETHTOWN— MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




jfef 






MSa, limtsiJLMr ilk M. A 






(Left to Right) Front Row: Phelps, Brumfield. Gains, Welsh, Miller, Swartz. Bird, Perry. Jetferies, Combs, 
Tuck. Second Row: Tinsley. L. Mace, Harmon, Ringo, Easley. Moore, Crabtree. Phillips, Spaulding, Beck, Yates, 
A. Frccland. Third Row: Avery, Allen, Gibson, Blacklock, Smith, Galvin, Maffett. Dixie, Garner, Gains, Neville, 
Gregory. Fourth Row: D. Frecland. Inman, Graviss, Jim Burks, Gray, Hoffman, Gremillion, Mayhew, John 
Burks, Pettigrew. Clageett. Fifth Row: M. Mace, Goldie. Boaz, Hoskinson, Joiner, Felkcr. 

PINEVILLE— SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front R<i« : Kimalil KuMin. Kenneth Bund>, Paul Blanton. t.ranl Bruvin. James t^rcene, 
Hoss Napier. Eugene Fuson. Bill Stewart. Claude Ryan. Jim Gragg. Second Row: Tom Fore, Joe Smith, Mil- 
ton Brooks. Jeff Roper, Lee Stewart. Fred Tipton. Eldon Rose. Josh Howard. Kenneth Williams. Mclvin Grif- 
fin, Edward Smith. Marshall Redmond. Third Row: Coach Bill Adams. John Warren. Allen Baker. Paul Cum- 
mins. John Ryan, John Golden. Tom Brackett. Fred Bush. Camie Redmond. Harry Bush. George Baker, Frank 
Neal, Grover Redmond. Ass't. Coach Orville Engle. 



vice an(3 illustrations covering every point 
which must be included in the planning of 
games, tournaments, and meets. 

The charter titles indicate the scope of 
the book. They are: Procedures for the Ad- 
ministration of All Athletic Events, The Ad- 
ministration of a High School Baseball 
Tournament, The Administration of a High 
School Basketball Tournament, The Admin- 
istration of a Cross-Country Meet. The Ad- 
ministration of a High School Football Game, 
The Administration of a High School Golf 
Tournament, The Administration of a High 
School Gymnastics Meet, The Administration 
of a High School Swimming Meet, The Ad- 
ministration of a High School Tennis Tourna- 
ment, The Administration of a High School 
Track Meet, The Administration of a High 
School Wrestling Tournament. 

In its announcement concerning the book, 



INTERSTATE says: "A handbook such as 
THE ADMINISTRATION OF HIGH 
SCHOOL ATHLETIC EVENTS will be bet- 
ter than a gold mine for the career coach or 
athletic director — with these guidelines and 
examples of actual forms, letters, maps, 
checklists, and the multitude of other detail- 
control aids provided in the book, planning 
and conducting high school athletic events 
and tournaments can become a joy, rather 
than a nightmare. Everyone enjoys doing 
what he can do well — and with this book, the 
man responsible for planning and conducting 
these events will do well !" 

D. G. W. S. Rules and Guides 

The Division for Girls and Women's 
Sports announces five new editions in its 
popular Sports Library. They are: The 
1961-63 Aquatics Guide-160 pages; The 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1961 



Season's 
Greetings 



KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



lUe KUufden Qo4npxi4Uf> 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



Basketball 
Basketball 



1961-63 Winter Sports and Outing Activities 
Guide-128 paiges; The 1961-63 Volleyball 
Guide-128 pages; The 1961-62 
Guide-160 pages; The 1961-62 
Rules Reprint-48 pages. 

The revised Guides contain up-to-date 
official rules and regulations for the indivi- 
dual sports or activities, new teaching art- 
icles, bibliographies, and special articles of 
interest as well as information about the 
Division of Girls and Women's Sports and 
its services. The Aquatics, Volleyball, and 
Basketball Guides have a section on officiat- 
ing rules and procedures. 

The Rules Reprint is a reprint of the 
rules section of the Basketball Guide. 

The Guides are $1.00 each and the Re- 
print is 35 cents. 

Order copies from AAHPER, 1201 16th 
Street, N. W., Washington 6, D. C; 2-9 
copies, 10 percent discount; 10 or more 
copies, 20 percent discount. 



CORRECTION 1961-62 
BASKETBALL RULES PUBLICATIONS 

Case Book: 

1. Page 3, Rule 1-5: Third word in second line 
should be "lane" instead of "line." 

2. P. S. 3: "Al," in ruling, should be "A6." 



3. P. S. 141 : Scorer's signal should not be recogniz- 
ed unless it is sounded before status of ball is about 
to change. 

4. P. S. 254: In the ruling, "If only 1 free throw is 
successful, an extra period is played," instead of 
started. 

5. P. S. 315: Second sentence should read: "Before 
ball touches any non-jumper." 

6. P. S. 328: The foul by A2 in (a) is penalized with 
free throws only if it is flagi-ant or intentional. Since 
Al is in control at the time of the foul, there would 
be no free throw for common foul by A2. 

7. P. S. 374: The violation is for failure to throw 
the ball directly into the court, not directly to a player 
on the court. 

Basketball Official's Manual: 

1. Page 15, Section 104: Add item "(h) check with 
the visiting team before they select floor for practice 
and have them select the basket for their pre-game 
wann-up. This basket shall be their basket for the 
first half." 

2. Page 16, Section 106: The 1961-62 rule change 
renders sentences 3 and 4 incorrect. 

3. Page 38, Section 332: Delete last sentence of 
Section 332. It is no longer true. 

4. Page 38, Section 333: Delete last sentence. 
Meeting Folder: 

1. Page 2, Rule 1-5: A neutral zone mark (12 inch- 
es by 8 inches) . . . 

2. Page 6, Question 5: Third line should begin 
"... ball touches ring or backboard . . ." 

3. Page 12, Item 6: Delete. This is a violation and 
it is not ignored. 




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MISCELLANEOUS — How is your stock on scorebooks, practice pants and jerseys, first-aid supplies, 
basketball nets and other items necessaiy for the basketball season? 
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:a 



High School Athfefe 



Class A State Champion Murray 



i^.^ 




if 



t^^w^'^'^ 



(Left to Kight) Front Kow: Kenny Humphreys, John Hutson, Charlie Robertson, Richard 
Workman. Steve Williams, James VV'ilson, Dickie Farrell, Jimmy Smith. Second Row : Tommy 
Latimer, Joe Fat Futrell, Dewayne McClure, Jerry Matthews, Glen Turner, Tommy Steele, J. L. 
Barnett, Mike Thurmond. Third Row: David Watkins, Donnie Edwards, Ronnie Edwards, Don- 
nie Danner, Tommy Wells, Norman Hale, Cary Miller, Roy Wyatt. Fourth Row : Ronnie Dan- 
ner, Don Faughn, Bud Nail, Ralph Jackson, Mike Manning, Danny Nix, Lee Vance, Steve Sex- 
ton. Fifth Row: Mgr. Donnie Cohoon, Jimmy Adam.s, Jimmy Johnson, Harry Weatherly, Ben 
Hogancamp, Craig Banks, Bernard Harvey. Sixth Row : Coaches W. P. Russell, Preston Hol- 
land, Eli Alexander. 



Murray 47 — Trigg County 
Murray 34 — Russellville 6 
Murray 52 — Morganfield 7 
Murray 8 — Mayfield 6 
Murray 20 — Fulton 6 
Murray .34 — Bowling Green 7 



Murray 44 — E'rovidence 13 
Murray — Tilghman 
Murray 40 — Hopkinsville 
Murray 46 — Paris (Tenn.) B 
Murray 35— Shelby ville 14 
Murray 14 — Lynch 13 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
JANUARY- 13B2 




Official Dickinson Ratings For Tlie 1961 Football Season 



CLASS A 
EEGION 1 

Team W 

Murray 5 

Attucks 5 

Russellville 3 

Fulton 2 

Douglass (Henderson) 2 

Trigg County 2 

Morganfield 2 

Lincoln (Franklin i 2 

Lincoln (Paducah) 2 

Western (Owensboro) 2 

High Street 1 

Providence 

Sturgis 3 

Douglass (Murray) 1 

REGION 2 

Team W 

Shelbyville 5 

Bardstown 6 

Glasgow 4 

Versailles 6 

Lebanon 3 

Georgetown 4 

Old Ky. Home 4 

Jessamine County 3 

Lancaster 2 

Stanford 3 

Tompkinsville 1 

Shepherdsville 3 

Anderson 3 

Harrodsburg 2 

Frankfort 1 

Metcalfe County 1 

Louisville Country Day 1 

Campbellsville 2 

Springfield 1 

Catholic Country Day 

Mercer County 

Bate 

Lincoln Institute 

REGION 3 

Team W 

Bellevue 4 

Mt. Sterling 3 

Paris 3 

Cynthiana 3 

Ludlow 3 

Catlettsburg 4 

DuBois 3 

Dayton 2 

Paintsville 3 

Pikeville 2 

Lloyd 

Carlisle 1 

Irvine 

M.M.I. 3 

Harrison County 

Carrollton 

Elkhorn City 

Morgan County 1 

Raceland 

Western (Paris) 1 

REGION 4 

Team W 

East Main (Lynch) 5 

Lily 4 

Pineville 4 

Williamsburg 3 

Eosenwald (Harlan) 2 

Loyall 3 

London 2 

Barbourville 2 

Dilce Combs 1 

Lynn Camp 1 

Harlan 1 

Buckhorn 

Wallins 

West Main (Lynch) 

CLASS AA 

REGION 1 

Team W 

Paducah 5 

Henderson County 6 

Mayfield 6 

Madisonville B 

Owensboro 4 



Dickinson 
Ratine 

22.50 
20.00 
18.75 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
12.50 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

26.00 
25.00 
22.50 
21.25 
20.00 
18.33 
17.85 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.37 
12.85 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.00 
11. eo 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

22.50 
21.25 
21.25 
20.00 
20.00 
18.00 
16.00 
15.83 
15.71 
15.00 
13.75 
12.50 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

22.50 
21.25 
20.62 
20.62 
19.37 
18.75 
14.28 
12.85 
12.50 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 
26.26 
23.75 
21.00 
19.28 



Caldwell County 7 

Owensboro Catholic 4 

Franklin Simpson 3 

Daviess County 2 

Bowling Green 2 

Crittenden County 1 

Hopkinsville 

Henderson 

Warren County 1 

Christian County 

REGION 2 

Team W 

Madison 6 

Elizabethtown 5 

Danville 5 

Lafayette 4 

Heni-y Clay 3 

Somerset 2 

Bryan Station 2 

Fort Knox 1 

Franklin County 2 

Clark County 1 

Oldham County 1 

St. Joseph 1 

K.M.I. 

Dunbar 

Shelby County 

REGION 3 

Team W 
Highlands 6 

Boone County 4 

Ashland 3 

Newport 3 

Dixie Heights 3 

Wurtland 2 

Holmes 1 

Russell 1 

Louisa 1 

Newport Catholic 

Campbell County 

McKell 3 



Team W 

Corbin 4 

Bell County 3 

Knox Central 3 

Evarts 3 

Cumberland 3 

Middlesboro 1 

Hall 

Hazel Green 

District 2 

Hazard 8 

Belfry 4 

Fleming-Neon 5 

.lenkins 4 

M. C. Napier 2 

Whitesburg 2 

Prestonsburg 1 

Wheelwright 1 

Leslie County 1 

CLASS AAA 

REGION 1 

Team W 

Flaget 7 

Male 4 

Manual 3 

Trinity 3 

DeSales 3 

Atherton 2 

St. Xavier 1 

Central 1 

Shawnee 

REGION 2 
District 1 

Team W 

Fairdale 7 

Fern Creek 6 

Valley 6 

Eastern 5 

Southern 3 

District 2 

Butler 5 

Durrett 2 

Seneca 1 

Waggoner 2 

Pleasure Ridge 



18.50 
17.85 
15.00 
15.00 
12.85 
12.00 
11.00 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

30.00 
23.75 
20.00 
19.37 
18.00 
15.00 
15.00 
13.75 
13.57 
12.50 
12.50 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 
19.58 
18.75 
18.75 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
12.50 
12.50 
10.00 
10.00 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

25.00 
18.75 
17.50 
16.67 
16.00 
12.00 
10.00 
N.R. 



27.50 
21.26 
21.26 
17.86 
14.00 
12.86 
12.00 
12.00 
11.67 



Dickinson 
Rating 

25.00 
19.00 
18.75 
15.00 
14.28 
14.00 
12.50 
12.50 
10.00 



Dickinson 
Rating 

26.25 
23.13 
22.50 
19.38 
13.75 

16.67 
14.29 
12.86 
12.85 
10.00 



I 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV— No. 6 



JANUARY, 1962 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions --Installment 2 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modif.v 
any rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

23. Play: Al is dribbling: ball i:i his back court 
when A2 violates by remaining' more than three sec- 
onds in the restricted part of his team's free thro'w 
lane. Where is the ball a-warded to team B 

Ruling: Ball is awarded to team B at the spot out 
of bounds nearest where A2 violated. 

24. Play: Al stands straddling' a cor.ier of the 
three-second restricted area of his free throw lane 
with both feet touching floor outside the lane area 
while his teammates are moving the ball around. 

Ruling: This is not illegal. 

25. Play: How much time may a player have to 
request an alternate position on the jumping circle? 

Ruling: The administering official will observe the 
position of all players around the circle and when he 
is certain there is no misunderstanding as to positions 
and no one is about to request an alternate position, 
he will proceed with his toss. Once he is ready to 
make the toss and the ball is about to change status, 
no change in positions is permitted. 

26. Play: On last free throw by Al, A2 touches 
ball while it is on ring. Is this a violation of the free 
throw provisions or is it basket interference? 

Ruling: Basket interference. Ball is awarded to 
team B at spot out of bounds nearest where violation 
occurred. 

27. Play: Al is dribbling near end of court when 
Bl quickly takes a legal position in his path. Al, in 
attempting to avoid Bl, loses possession inbounds and 
his momentum carries him out of bounds. In attempt- 
ing to steal the ball, Bl also goes out of bounds. No 
foul is committed. Ball remains on playing court, 
bouncing free. Al returns to court before Bl recovers. 
Al then continues his dribble. 

Ruling: There is no penalty for Al or Bl leaving 
and returning to the court in this situation. Dribble 
by Al ended when he lost control. If Bl did not bat 
the ball nor touch the fumble by Al, it was a viola- 
tion for Al to dribble again. However, Al could re- 
cover the ball without violation. 

28. Play: Al has been awarded a free throw and 
he has the ball in his hands preliminary to his try 
when A2, along the free thi-ow lane, pushes B3. 

Ruling: False double foul. Foul by A2 occurs while 
teammate is in control. B3 is not awarded a free 
throw. Ball is tossed at center after Al has com- 
pleted his try or tries. 

29. Play: A free throw by Al is in flight when 
A2, along the lane, pushes B3. 

Ruling: False double foul. The ball is dead after 
each free throw is ended. After Al has completed his 
free throw or free throws, B3 is awarded his free 
throw or free throws. After B3 has completed his 
try or tries, the ball is tossed at center. 

30. Play: Substitute A6 has reported to the scor- 
er and is ready and entitled to enter. A violation 
occurs. The scorer sounds his horn. The official signals 
time-out and beckons A6 to enter. After the clock is 
stopped, substitute B6 comes to the table and wishes 



to enter. 

Ruling: B6 may not enter, since he had not re- 
ported to the scorer before the violation occurred. 
Only those substitutes who have already reported 
prior to the violation and are ready to enter are 
eligible to do so. 

31. Play: Substitute A6 has reported to the scorer 
and is ready and entitled to enter. A violation occurs. 
Scorer sounds his horn. The official signals time-out 
and beckons A6 to enter. A6 enters and replaces Al. 
Al immediately goes to the scorer's table and wishes 
to reenter during this same time-out period as a 
substitute for A6, who has just replaced him. 

Ruling: Al may not reenter during this same 
time-out period since he had not reported when the 
violation occurred. If this procedure were allowed, a 
team which was trailing by a few points in the clos- 
ing stages of the game could get the clock stopped 
every time a violation occurred and actually never 
remove one of its players from the game. This would 
enable it to stop the clock and still keep the same five 
players in the game. 

32. Play: Last minute of the game. Al has a tall 
center and has been successful in securing the jump. 
Score is team A40 — team B40. Al is at the free throw 
line with the ball in his control for a try. A2, along 
the free throw lane, fouls B2 so there will be a jump 
at center (false double foul) and team B will not 
have an opportunity for a throw-in. 

Ruling: Foul by team A is an intentional foul and 
B2 is awarded two free throws after Al has com- 
pleted his try or tries. Jump at center after B2 has 
made his attempts. 

33. Play: Al is fouled and his glasses are broken 
in the process. His coach maintains that Al cannot 
see well enough to shoot free throw and wants to 
enter A6 to shoot the free throw. Official informs the 
coach that if A6 shoots free throw for Al the latter 
may not reenter the game after glasses have been 
repaired. Does the official have this right? 

Ruling: The official should not make such a de- 
cision. It is not for him to determine who may or may 
not play, except in cases of disqualification, as cover- 
ed by the rules. The above situation is similar to one 
involving injury and the official does not decide 
whether the player must leave and whether he is able 
to return. The fact that a player, in the opinion of the 
coach, doctor or trainer (who must assume this 
responsibility), is unable to play at one moment does 
not preclude the possibility that he may be ready to 
play at another time in the game. 

34. Play: May a coach use: (a) written notes 
carried onto the floor by a substitute; or (b) sign or 
flash cards displayed at the bench to direct or en- 
courage his team 

Ruling: Yes. The present coverage does not pro- 
hibit notes or signs, as long as their use is sportsman- 
like and does not tend to incite the spectators. 

35. Play: Al travels. B2 has previously reported 
to the scorer and is ready and eligible to enter. The 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Pag-e Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



JANUARY, 1962 VOL. XXIV— No. 6 

PabUshed monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexingrton, Ky. 

Entered as aecond-clasa matter in the post office at Lexinfirton* 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky, 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62). Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. GUIaspie (1959-63), (JeorBetown 

Directors— Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville: Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-631, Greenville: Preston Holland 11961-651. Murray: 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-66), Danville: Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64). Paintsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



^iom the d 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1961 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered officials 
qualified for the advanced rating of "Approved" and 
"Certified" as a result of the National Federation 
basketball examination which was given in Kentucky 
on December 4, 1961. The "Approved" rating does 
not carry forward from year to year, but must be 
earned each year. After an official has received the 
"Certified" rating, he keeps this rating by clinic 
attendance. Only officials receiving these higher rat- 
ings are eligible to work in the regional tournaments. 
Only "Certified" officials, who are residents of Ken- 
tucky, are eligible to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 
Certified Officials 



Adkins, Raymond C. 
Ale.xander, Rex 
Allen, Lowry R. 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Almond. Alvin 
Arnold, Kenneth 
Baker, James E. 
Baird, Bill 
Ballard, Jack H. 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Bennett, Bert 
Blackburn, Viley 0. 
Boyles, Paul E. 
Bridges, Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Brown, E. C. 
Bruner, Jack C. 
Brown, James W. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Canter, .John 
Casteel, Ralph M. 
Chattin, Charles 
Coleman, L. J. "'Duke" 
Conley, George 
Cooper, John Wellington 



Lucas, Gene 
McClellan, L. B. 
McGehee, G. K. 
McGuffev, Harold 
MeLeod, Robert N. 
McMillin, Larry 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Macon, Alan Leon 
Mahan, Carle 
Maines, George 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mays, Ralph J. 
Meade, Foster "Sid" 
Metcalf, Earl L. 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Miller, Roy J. 
Mudd, Ed 
Mussman, Ralph 
Nau, Bill 
Neal, Gene 
Newton, CM. 
Nixon, James W. 
Nord, Ed 



Cooper, Warren 
Craft, Bill 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 
Crutcher, James W. 
Cummins, Al 
Davis, Bunny 
David, Don 
Davis, Harold T. 
Dotson, John B. 
Drake, Richard R. 
Driskell, Earl, Jr. 
Duerson, William R. 
Duncan, Earl 
Durkin, Jack 
Edelen, Ben R. 
Elrod, Wm. Turner 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Fields, Joe D. 
Flynn, Bobby 
Foster, William R. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Goley, James E. 
Green, Walt 
Grisham, Jesse R. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Harrell, Bill D. 
Haynes, John 
Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hodge, Fred 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Huter, Jim 
Hyatt, Bob 
Inman, Briscoe 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, Wm. Bernard 
Johnson, Walter 
Jordon, Kenneth P. 
Kimmel, Jerry 
King, Bob 
King, Jim 
King, P. J. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer, Joe 
Lance, Walter 
LeVan, Thomas F. 
Long, Bill 

Longanecker, David M. 
Looney, Dick 
Lytle, Price 



Omer, Billy 
Padgett, R. K. 
Parker, Billie E. 
Pergrem, Bernard 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 
Powell, Logan 
Pursiful, Cleophus 
Reed, Charles R. 
Reed, Gordon 
Reinhardt, Myron 
Richardson, Joe M. 
Richetts, C. O. 
Riggs, William T. 
Ritter, Goebel 
Roller, Otis 
Rothfuss, Dick 
Rouse, Clyde L. 
Rubarts, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
St. Clair, Robert L., Jr. 
Sanders, Mel 
Schlich, Paul E. 
Selvy, Curt 
Settle, Evan E., Jr. 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Earl 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Sosh, LaRue 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
Stanfill, Robert 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Taylor, Ed 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Thompson, Jack 
Thompson, Ralph 
Tucker, Neal R. 
Varble, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weaver, Ray 
Weisbrodt, Paul 
Wells, Milford 
Wesche, James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Roger 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wise, Jack 
Wright, Paul 
Wurtz, Emil 



Approved Officials 



Akins, Charlie 
Baughn, E. L. 
Bradshaw, Bill 
Brewer, Randall L. 
Brown, John W. 
Gathers, Bob 
Davenport, Robert B. 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Fuller, John R., Jr. 
Gibson, Fred W. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Gour, Robert A. 
Graham, James E. 
Hammons, Norman 
Hatter, Jack 
Hewitt, R. T. 



Hill, Earl F. 
Hook, Burnley B., Jr. 
Knotts, Franklin D. 
Lowe, Eugene T. 
McClure, Wm. Scott 
Meadows, Marvin Ray 
Moore, Robert 
Moore, Roy, Jr. 
Morse, Richard K. 
Quillen, John T. 
Ring, William H. 
Shackleford, Roscoe 
Strong, Arnett 
Wise, Billy 
Zachem, Vincent 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 19G2 



Page Three 



1961-62 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



School 



Address 



Tel. No. Principal 



Basketball Coach 



REGION 1 



D. 1 Carlisle County 
Fulton 

Fulton County 
Hickman County 
Riverview 

D. 2 Ballard Memorial 
Heath 
Lincoln 
Lone Oak 
Paducah Tilghman 
Reidland 
St. John 
St. Mary'.s Acad. 

D. 3 Cuba 
Dunbar 
Fancy Farm 
Farming-ton 
Lowes 
Mayfield 
Sedalia 
S.ymsonia 
Wingo 

D. 4 Benton 

Calloway County 
Douglass 
Murray 

Murray College 
North Marshall 
South Marshall 



R. 3, Bard well 

Fulton 

Hickman 

Clinton 

Hickman 

R. 1, Barlow 

R. 1, W. Paducah 

Paducah 

Paducah 

Paducah 

R. 8, Paducah 

R. 5, Paducah 

Paducah 

R. 1, Mayfield 

Mayfield 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Lowes 

Mayfield 

Sedalia 

Symsonia 

Wingo 

Benton 

R. 2, Murray 

Murray 

Murray 

Murray 

Calvert City 

R. 1, Benton 



MA 8-5411 0. J. Mitchell 
697 J. M. Martin 

3168 Tom Johnson 
OL 3-5461 James H. Phillips 

2070 A. W. Greene 



Tom Adkins 
Chester Caddas 
Harold Garrison 
Harold Wilkins 
Robert Danner 



665-5151 Robert G. Fiser J. H. Frank 

Don Steohenson W. E. Carter 

E. W. Whiteside John C. McVoy 

443-1211 John Robinson Glenn Dexter 

443-6296 Bradford D. Mutchler Otis Dinning 

898-2411 Richard L. Winebarger Ervin Johnston 
443-1867 Sr. Mary Marcia 

443-2677 Sr. Julia Frances, SCN Jack McKinney 



EV 2-2160 

CH 7-4520 

MA 3-3181 

FI 5-2171 

674-5333 

CH 7-4461 

328-3241 

2141 

376-3271 



Joe McPherson 
F. 1. Stiger 
Sr. Celine Maria 
C. W. Jones 
W. W. Chumbler 
Barkley Jones 
Bob Eaker 
Cecil Reid 
Howard V. Reid 



LA 7-2511 J. Delton Dodds 
753-5479 William B. Miller 
L. P. Miller 
PL 3-5202 Fred Schultz 
PL 3-2310 Wilson Gantt 
EX 5-4400 Robert Goheen 
LA 7-2891 Reed Conder 



Freed Curd 
A. Dawson 
Joe Mikez 
Larry Colley 
Gene Mason 
Jack Story 
Kenneth Wray 
Bobby Noles 
James A. Baker 

Billy Joe Farris 
Richard Vincent 
John Prewitt 
Eli Alexander 
Garrett Beshear 
Charlie Lampley 
William Cothran 



REGION 2 



D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


William F. Brown 


George B. Perry 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


5-4226 Ercel Little 


L. B. Gasten 


Dotson 


Princeton 


EM 5-2155 B. S. Miller 


J. W. Withrow 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


4231 Odell Walker 


Rayborne Pickering 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


Salem 31R Kenneth T. Hardin 


Rex Smith 


Lyon County 


Kuttawa 


5201 John E. Floyd 


Frank Wright 


D. 6 Charleston 


Dawson Springs 


SW 7-2298 Lewis Good 


Jewel Logan 


Dalton 


Dalton 


249-3421 A. 0. Richards 


Edwin Martin 


Earlington 


Earlington 


3-5220 James W. Larmouth 


James W. Lai-mouth 


Hanson 


Hanson 


DA 2-3601 David Siria 


Dewey A. Parson 


J. W. Million 


Earlington 


Lester G. Mimms 


Lester G. Mimms 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


TA 1-2824 Charles N. Boozer 


Curtis Sherrell 


Nebo 


Nebo 


249-3321 A. C. Carneal 


David Jenkins 


Rosenwald 


Madisonville 


TA 1-5044 Mrs. Pearl M. Arnett 


Caldwell Smith 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


676-3443 Charles Jenkins 


Earl Adkins 


D. 7Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


885-8278 F. B. Simpson 


William M. Falls, Sr. 


Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


TU 6-1084 I. Fred Porter 


John Rendek 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


SW 7-3811 R. A. Belt 


Philip D. Back 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


TU 6-2433 Chester C. Redmon 


Roy Allison 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


LA 2-8575 Arthur Wallace 


Duke Burnett 


D. SClifty 


Cliffy 


277-3181 0. P. Hurt 


Harold Gorrell 


Guthrie 


Guthrie 


483-2355 Waldo L. Wolfe 


William Longhurst 


Todd County 


Elkton 


265-2407 Robert N. Bush 


Harold Ross 


Todd Co. Training 


Elkton 


265-2566 William T. Gilbert 


Jimmy Harris 



Pagie Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



School 



Addi ess 



Tel. No. Principal 



Basketball Coach 



REGION 3 



D. 9 Clay 
Dixon 
Providence 
Rosenwald 
Sebree 
Slaughters 

D. 10 Douglass 
Dunbar 
Henderson 
Hendei'son County 
Holy Name 
Morganfield 
St. Ag-nes 
St. Vincent Acad. 
Sturgis 

D. 11 Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 

D. 12 Daviess County 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Western 



Clay 

Dixon 

Providence 

Providence 

Sebree 

Slaughters 

Henderson 

Moreanfield 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Morganfield 

Uniontown 

St. Vincent 

Sturgis 

Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 

Owensboro 
Owensboro 
Owensboro 
Owensboro 



NO 4-2227 Clifton Wilson 
ME 9-9080 P. D. Fancher 

667-2411 L. G. Tubbs 
MO 7-2531 Herbert Jones 
TE 5-7891 Jam=s M. Lynch 
TU 4-2091 Lloyd Sharp 

VA 6-3701 H. B. Kirkwood 

476 Charles N. Crutcher 
VA 6-95'^8 Trov E. Spear 
826-9051 J. W. Duncan 
VA 7-9297 Sr. Sara Ann, SCN 
291 Thomas Brantley 
69 Rev. R. G. Hill 
WA 2611 Sr. Ravmunda, SCN 
4008 H'Earl Evans 

525-3411 Hoy R. Long 
BR 3-32S4 L. D. Knight 
BR 8-2522 J. David Boyken 
RE 6-2731 A. G. Crume 

MU 4-5285 W. P. Wheeler 

MU 3-2611 Joe O. Brown 

MU 3-9614 Sr. Helen Constance 

3-7204 H. E. Goodloe 



Wayne Willson 
Estel Manasco 
L. G. Tubbs 
Herbert Jones 
Eldon Bradley 
Bobby Chaney 

George K. McGill 
John A. Howard 
Chester Montgomery 
Norman O'Nan 
James K. Lindenberg 
Bill Foster 

Rev. Anthony Ziegler 
Robert J. Velton 
H. D. Holt, Jr. 

Bob Rickard 
Don Parson 
Don Walker 
Jude Talbott 

W. B. Sydnor 
Robert Watson 
Tom Hamilton 
Whaylon Coleman 



REGION 4 



D. 13 Breckinridge Co. 
Flaherty 
Frederick-Fraize 
Hancock County 
Irvington 
Meade County 

D. 14 Butler County 
Caneyville 
Clarkson 

Edmonson County 
Leitchfield 

D. 15 Beaver Dam 
Ceritertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 

D. 16 Central City 
Community 
Drakesboro 
Graham 
Greenville 
Hughes-Kirk 
Muhlenberg Central 



Hardinsburg SK 6-5184 R. F. Peters 

Vine Grove 828-3885 H. W. Hunt 

Cloverport SU 8-3388 V. M. Vibbert 

Lewisport 927-2531 Forrest Williamson, Jr. 

Irvington W. O. Jackson 

Brandenburg 422-4665 Stuart Pepper 

Morgantown LA 6-30S2 W. Foyesst West 

Caneyville 879-4211 Ramon Majors 

Clarkson CI 2-3061 James M. Wood 

Brownsville LY 7-39-^0 John M. Lane 

Leitchfield 308 John H. Taylor 

Beaver Dam BR 4-4478 J. W. Park 

Centertown BE 2-4213 Bryan Taylor 

Fordsville CR 6-3601 Earl S. Reid 

Hartford CY 8-3713 Charles S. Combs 

Horse Branch BR 4-4662 W. M. Arnold 

Central City 9 Delmas Gish 

Drakesboro GR 6-2210 William Traylor 

Drakesboro GR 6-2630 W. J. Wilcutt 

Graham Depoy 2042 James Jennings 

Gree.nville 212 Ernest Atkins 

Beechmont GR 6-2207 Charles Fades 

Powderly 143 Lyle C. Baugh 



Donald Morris 
Donald M. Turner 
W. T. Bennett 
Denzel Mefford 
Jack Williamson 
Bill Case 

W. O. Warren, Jr. 
Durwood Neel 
Bowman Davenport 
Robert Burres 
John H. Taylor 

James E. Guess 
Bryan Taylor 
Lyle Dunbar 
Charles S. Combs 
J. R. Whitehead 

Jackie Day 
Norman Pritchett 
James P. Hill 
Kenneth Arbuckle 
Kenneth Sidwell 
Wayne Ewing 
Bob Daniels 



REGION 5 



D. 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 
Bristow 
College 

Franklin-Simpson 
High Street 
Lincoln 

North WaiTen 
Richards ville 
St. Joseph 
Warren County 



Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

R. 1, Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Bowling Green 

Franklin 

Smiths Grove 

Richardsville 

Bowling Green 

Bowling Green 



843-8067 

VI 2-1695 

VI 2-1960 

2-3542 

586-5251 

V! 2-1638 

JU 6-3342 

LO 3-2041 

842-3504 

2-7302 



Arthur M. Reynolds 
Raymond H. Herndon 
Kenreth Harvey 
J. A. Cai-penter 
J. W. Dunn 
E. T. Buford 
W. H. Story 
Andrew Renick 
George Coker, Jr. 
Sr. Alice Louise 
C. H. Harris 



James Walker 
Woodrow Crum 
Jay Atkerson 
Alvin Almond 
John Price 
F. 0. Moxlev 
William Griffith 
Bob Fox 

John M. Lane, Jr. 
Larry Doughty 
Jesse Kimbrough 



I 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Page Five 



School 

D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandler's Chapel 
Lewisburg 
Olmstead 
Russellville 

D. 19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Bunche 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 

D. 20 Clinton County 

Cumberland County 
Gamaliel 
Metcalfe County 
Tompkinsville 



Address Tel. No. Principal 

Adairville JE 9-7711 Jesse L. Richards 

Auburn LI 2-4181 Jim S. Richards 

R. 2, Auburn LI 2-6427 Morris Shelton 

Lewisburg,- SK 5-6191 J. M. Vance 

Olmstead RE 4-4620 W. N. Alexander 

Russellville PA 6-6434 Harold Hunter 

Scottsville 237-3841 T. C. Simmons 

Lucas HE 4-8686 Kenneth B. Sidwell 

Glasgow OL 7-3988 L. J. Twyman 

Glasgow OL 2256 Edwin Mayes 

Hiseville GL 3-2611 F. P. Newberry 

Park City SH 9-2665 W. L. Gardner 

Scottsville 237-3751 Bruce Stewart 

R. 4, Glasgow GA 7-2611 David Montgomery 

Albany 31 I^. H. Robinson 

Burkesville Leon King 

Gamaliel GL 7-2341 Edwin Steen 

Edmonton GE 2-2131 Garland Creech 

Tompkinsville HU 7-5617 Randall Grider 



Basketball Coach 

Glenn McGehee 
Jim Richards 
Thomas D. Garrett 
Van L. Washer 
Earl Shelton 
Jim Young 

James Bazzell 
Charles Day 
Frank Terrell 
Dickie Parsons 
Gene Johnson 
Albert Ellison 
Ernest C. Neil, II 
Ray Burden 

Lindle Castle 
Larry McDonald 
Tommy Downing 
Cortez Butler 
John Marrs 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Durham 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 

D. 22 Caverna 
Cub Run 
LaRue County 
Memorial 
Munfordville 

D. 23 Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Cath. 

Fort Knox 

Glendale 

Howevalley 

Lynnvale 

Rineyville 

Sonora 

Vine Grove 

D. 24 Bardstown 
Bloomfield 
Fredericktown 
Mackville 
Old Ky. Home 
St. Catherine 
St. Joseph Prep. 
Springfield 
Willisburg 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 

Horse Cave 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Hardyville 
Munfordville 

Elizabethtown 
Eilizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
Glendale 
R. 1, Cecilia 
White Mills 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 

Bardstown 

Bloomfield 

R. 2, Springfield 

Mackville 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Bardstown 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



REGION 6 

384-2751 Brooks Coomer 
465-5091 Paul Coop 
465-5121 M. J. Strong 
WE 2-5231 E. E. Tate 

692-3441 Charles F. Martin 
692-2053 Sr. M. Anton 
692-4578 Sr. Florentia 
865-2731 Sr. Mary Carl, OSU 
465-4431 J. G. McAnelly 

PR 3-7951 Wilbur Smith 
JA 4-2525 James E. Redden 

8-3195 Everett G. Sanders 
LA 8-2271 Glen O. Barrett 
J A 4-4651 H. D. Puckett 

RO 5-5237 Paul E. Kemck 
Sr. Mary Janice 
4-7019 S. M. Matarazzo 
UL 4-2300 Damon Ray 
TO 2-1287 Earl B. Goodman 
TO 2-3334 Kenneth Riddle 

5-5356 H. L. Perkins 
EM 9-2101 Dellard Moor 
877-5165 James T. Alton 

FI 8-8147 Vincent Zachem 
T. T. Etheredge 
Sr. Charles Asa 
2771 Robert Drury 
8-8473 Ralph Alexander 
LI 9-3194 Sr. Lennora 
FI 8-3856 Brother DeSales 
336-3718 Robert L. Robertson 
375-2217 Z. T. Lester 



John Burr 
Paul Coop 
Harold Steele 
Carl Deaton 
Hubert Edwards 
Rev. James Schlich 
Tom Clark 
Sam B. Thomas 
Billy B. Smith 

Ralph Dorsey 
Clyde E. Smith 
Corky Cox 
Reathel Goff 
Ray Hammers 

Charles Rawlings 
Hardin McLane 
Bob Burrows 
Edwin A. Goodman 
William Johnson 
Albert McLane 
C. R. Perkins 
Claude Sharp 
Bill Jones 

Garnis Martin 
Ernest Ruby 
Bernard Thompson 
Charles Hume 
William Parrott 
Fred Bean, Jr. 
Bill Echard 
William Yankey 
Michael E. Speck 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



School 



TeL No Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 25 Central 
Flag-et 
St. Xavier 
Shawnee 

D. 26 DeSales 

duPont Manual 
J. M. Atherton 
Male 

D. 27 Bishop David Mem. 
Butler 
Durrett 
Fairdale 
Fein Creek 
Pleasure Ridge Pk. 
Southern 
Valley 

D. 28 Aquinas Prep. 
Eastern 

Ky. Military Inst. 
Ky. School for Blind 
Louisville Ctry Day 
Seneca 
Trinity 
Waggener 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 

Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 

Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Fairdale 
Fern Creek 
Pleasure Ridge Pk. 
Louisville 
Valley Station 

Louisville 

Middletown 

Lyndon 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 



REGION 7 

JU 4-8443 Atwood S. Wilson Edward Q. Adams 

SP 8-9000 Brother Aubin, CFX James Morris 

636-2525 Rev. Br. Edward Daniel Joe Reibel 
SP 6-4653 Robert B. Clem Jerome Keiffner 

EM 8-6519 Rev. Jude Cattelona John Haury 

ME 7-1477 A. J. Ries James Casillo 

JU 3-7697 Russell Garth Fred Allen, Jr. " 

JU 5-2526 Foster Sanders Guy Strong 

WA 1-1441 Rev. Clarence Schwartz Leo Tierney 



EM 3-2628 H. L. Hatfield 
GL 8-4032 J. C. Bruce 
EM 6-1468 Harry K. Hardin 
W. K. Niman 
921-9230 John H. Pollock 
969-1331 T. T. Knight 
WE 7-2300 J. C. Cantrell 



TW 5-9411 
CH 5-4161 

896-1701 
TW 7-1583 
TW 5-3452 
GL 1-4330 

895-9427 
TW 5-0567 



Daniel M. O'Neill 
John W. Trapp 
N. C. Hodgin 
William F. Davis 
Harry F. Ludwig 
K. B. Farmer 
A. W. Steinhauser 
Earl S. Duncan 



Andrew Diersing 
Donald Brooks 
Forest E. Able 
Gerry Calvert 
Jerry Moreman 
William Kidd 
W. B. Fisher 

Bill Kleier 
William B. Hoke 
W. T. Simpson 
Will D. Evans 
Delmar Wallace 
Bob Mulcahy 
Edd Kellow 
Ro.v Adams 



D. 29 Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
St. Aloysius 
St. Benedict 
Shepherds ville 

D. 30 Lincoln Inst. 
Shelby County 
Shelbyville 
Taylorsville 

D. 31 Eminence 

Henry County 
Oldham County 
Trimble County 

D. 32 CarroUton 

Gallatin County 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Williamstown 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Shepherdsville 
Lebanon Junction 
Shepherdsville 

Lincoln Ridge 
Shelbyville 
Shelbyville 
Taylorsville 

Eminence 
New Castle 
LaGrange 
Bedford 

CarroUton 
Warsaw 
Dry Ridge 
Owenton 
Williamstown 



REGION 8 

TE 3-4623 George E. Valentine 
KE 8-4227 C. L. Francis 
LI 3-6094 Sr. M. Francelle, OTU 
TE 3-4829 Sr. Lucina Maria, SCN 
Willis G. Wells 

PA 2-8833 Whitney M. Young 
ME 3-2344 Bruce Sweeney 
ME 3-48S9 Richard Greenwell 
GR 7-2230 Harvey G. Bush 

VI 5-4071 George Stucker 

346-6681 D. P. Parsley 
BR 9-5263 A. L. Roberts 
255-3268 Clyde C. Cropper 

732-5215 Palmore Lyles 
JO 7-5401 W. C. Stevens 
TA 4-5001 Ralph Blakey 

5509 Cyrus E. Greene 
TA 4-5771 M. J. Belew 



Glenn B. Smith 
Lloyd Mullins 
Rev. Herbei-t Uphaus 
Rev. Roger Boehmicke 
Denzil Ramsey 

Alvin C. Hanley 
Bill Harrell 
Evan Settle 
B. F. Mullins 

Mitchell Bailey 
Fred Rice 
Barney Thweatt 
Joe Barnett 

Shiiiey Kearns 
Happy Osborne 
Steve Shuck 
Bill Smith 
Paul Watts 



D. 33 Boone County 
Dixie Heights 
Lloyd 
St. Henry 
Simon -Kenton 
Walton-Verona 



REGION 9 

Florence 283-3331 Chester Goodridge Don Eddy 

S. Ft. Mitchell DI 1-7650 Anthony H. Hohnhorst Lewis Phillips 

Erlanger EI 1-7530 Gordon Simpson A. W. Lancaster 

Erlang3r DI 1-9811 Sr. M. Teresa, OSB Mote Hils 

Independence 358-3541 George H. Edmondson Robert Taylor 

Walton 485-4293 William C. Doan Don Shaw 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Page Seven 



School 



Address 



TeL No, J'rincipal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 34 Beechwood 

Covington Cath. 
Holmes 
Holy Cross 
Ludlow 
William Grant 

D. 35 Bellevue 
Dayton 
Newport 
Newport Catholic 

D. 36 Brossart 

Campbell County 
Highlands 
St. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



S. Ft. Mitchell 

Covington 

Covington 

Latonia 

Ludlow 

Covington 

Bellevue 
Dayton 
Newport 
Newport 

Alexandria 
Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Ft. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



ED 1-1220 Thelma W. Jones Harold Williams 

HE 1-5351 Bro. Donald Fahrig, SM Robert Naber 

HE 1-3604 H. B. Tudor Tom Ellis 

431-1335 Sister Clarita George Schneider 

CO 1-8211 Arthur T. Tipton Carl R. Wenderoth 

HE 1-1881 Charles L. Lett James E. Brock 

CO 1-2980 Donald Davis Roy McKenney 

CO 1-4357 Dr. W. Dwight Sporing George Houston 

CO 1-2860 James L. Cobb Stanley Arnzen 

HI 1-7100 Rev. John Hegenauer James R. Connor 

MY 7-3341 Sr. Mary Carleta, SND Joseph Gastright 

MY 7-8181 Edward E. Ball Lawrence Kinney 

HI 1-1301 Harold Miller Robert Luecke 

HI 1-2211 Sr. Elizabeth Marie Richard Hehman 

HI 1-3873 Robert F. Dozier Charles F. Doll, Jr. 



REGION 10 



D. 37 Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Harrison County 
Scott County 

D. 38 Augusta 

Bracken County 
Deming 

Falmouth 
Pendleton 

D. 39 Fleming County 
Mason County 
Maysville 
St. Patrick 
Tollesboro 

D. 40 Bourbon County 
Carlisle 

Millersburg Mil. Inst. 
Nicholas County 
North Middletown 
Paris 
Paris Western 



Cynthiana 
Georgetown 
Cynthiana 
Georgetown 

Augusta 

Brooksville 

Mt. Olivet 

Falmouth 

R. 5, Falmouth 

Flemingsburg 

Maysville 

Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 

Paris 

Carlisle 

Millersburg 

Carlisle 

North Middletown 

Paris 

Paris 



298 Kellev B. Stanfield 
70 William L. Mills 
670 Joe H. Anderson 
635 William L. Hampton 

PL 6-4282 Alice Kate Field 
5-3891 Jarvis Parsley 
701 H. 0. Hale 
OL 4-3316 C. A. Hellard 
OL 4-3355 Reedus Back 

VI 5-6601 Martin Marlar 
564-6409 Elza Whalen 
564-3856 Orville B. Hayes 
Sr. M. Robert 
8-2541 Charles M. Hughes 

1465 Joe E. Sabel 

216 Miss Nancy E. Talbert 
4352 Lt. Col. F. H. Hall 

477 Charles Wilson 
4523 J. C. Falkenstine 
1767 Milton O. Traylor 

754 William B. Reed 



Woody Preston 
Harry Graham 
Charles Sutherland 
John L. Crigler 

Lou Cunningham 
Jarvis Parsley 
Jesse Amburgev 
Cecil Hellard 
Dwight Wolfe 

Clay Evans 
William Ryan 
Larry Wood 
Francis Stahl 
Joe A. Simons 

J. Robert Barlow 
Gayle Bowen 
Owen Dieterle 
Glenn Dorroh 
Fred Creasey 
Eugene Clark 
William B. Reed 



D. 41 Frankfort 

Franklin County 
Good Shepherd 
Midway 
Versailles 

D. 42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodsburg 
Jessamine County 
Mercer County 
Rosenwald-Dunbar 
Western 

D. 43 Bryan Station 
Douglass 
Henry Clay 
Lafayette 

Lexington Catholic 
P. L. Dunbar 
University 



REGION 11 

Frankfort CA 3-8030 Robert C. Hume 

Frankfort 3-8248 Ronald Connelly 

Frankfort CA 7-9233 Sr. Winifred Ann 

Midway TH 6-2531 Marion Crowe 

Versailles TR 3-4741 Charles 0. Dawson 

Lawrenceburg TE 9-3431 James D. Boyd 

Burgin 748-5170 Patrick E. Napier 

Harrodsburg 734-3242 William D. Smart 

Nicholasville Billy Lockridge 

Harrodsburg 734-4195 Roy R. Camic 

Nicholasville TU 5-5591 Mrs. Ada HoUoway 

Sinai 9-3608 Robert B. Turner 

Lexington 4-1581 R. L. Grider 

Lexington 2-3733 F. D. Talbert 

Lexington 2-5565 Clyde T. Lassiter 

Lexington 7-5430 Dr. H. L. Davis 

Lexington 7-4775 Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 

Lexington 2-0640 Paul L. Guthrie 

Lexington 2-2200 J. H. Powell 



John Lykins 
Charles Mrazovich 
Charles Furr 
Ed Allin 
James McAfee 

Charles Grote 
Robert J. Elder 
Jim Mitchell 
Ronnie Hale 
Zeb Blankenship 
Leonard J. Cavil 
Robert Anderson 

Robert Abney 
C. H. Livisay 
Elmer Gilb 
Ken Caudill 
Fred O'Brien 
Sanford T. Roach 
Eugene Huff 



Pag-e Eipht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Tel. No Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


986-3521 Mrs. Mable Todd 


Don Mills 


Estill County 


Irvine 


723-3537 Luther Patrick 


James Kiser 


Foundation 


Berea 


986-4911 Roy N. Walters 


Ray B. Rose 


Irvine 


Irvine 


723-3616 Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison 


Richmond 


623-4959 W. L. Holloway 


Del Combs 


Madison Centi'al 


Richmond 


623-1530 James B. Moore 


Russell Roberts 


Model 


Richmond 


623-5452 Dixon A. Barr 
REGION 12 




D. 45 Bate 


Danville 


236-6756 William Summers 


Emmett Broadus, Sr. 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


792-2459 W. R. Duerson 


William Butner 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


R. 5, Lancaster 


548-2208 W. R. Tudor 


David Feeback 


Danville 


Danville 


236-6373 Don R. Rawlings 


David Cottrell 


Forkland 


Gravel Switch 


332-7146 Donald Lamb 


Gerald Sinclair 


Junction City 


Junction City 


854-3956 Earl Cocanougher 


Douglas Hamm 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


792-3301 Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Harold Murphy 


Mason 


Lancaster 


792-3181 Mrs. Tommie F. Merritt Warren Wainwright 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


925-2711 Miss Fay Ward Little 


Homer L. Profitt 


Parksville 


Parksville 


236-3753 Joseph E. Wesley 


Hillard Combs 


Perryville 


Perryville 


332-8311 Garland Purdom 


Larry Wooden 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


D. A. Robbin 


W. D. Riddle 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


EL 5-3541 L. A. Wash 


H. Elliott 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


346-2611 Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


787-3941 Stanley E. Bryant 


Pat Tully 


Lincoln 


Stanford 


FO 5-2828 G. W. Parks 


C. E. Kavanaugh 


Living-ston 


Livingston 


453-2121 Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKinney 


McKinney 


346-2942 M. C. Montgomery 


Monty Singleton 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


FO 5-7018 Lester M. Mullins 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middleburg 


Middleburg 


787-2852 Nathaniel Buis 


Truman Godby 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


256-2953 Cleston Saylor 


Jack L. Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


FO 5-2191 Lee T. Mills 


Dienzel Dennis 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


Hobart R. Thompson 


Oscar L. Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


9-4631 J. B. Albright 


Jack Garrett 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


678-5229 Howard T. Moore 


Herbert Childers 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


DR 6-2213 Johnnie Ray Laswell 


Joe S. Williams 


Monticello 


Monticello 


FI 8-2331 Vernon Miniard 


Joe Harper 


Nancy 


Nancy 


678-4942 Herbert T. Higgins 


Garvis Burkett 


Pine Knott 


Pine Knot 


EL 4-2511 Clark Morton 


Howard Jones 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


679-1574 Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 Marshall Dixon 


Aubrey Johnson 


Shopville 


Shopville 


274-3181 Murrell P. Stewart 


Gene G. McFall 


Somerset 


Somerset 


678-4721 W. B. Jones 


Doug Hines 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


FI 8-3311 Arthur J. Lloyd 


Ray Mills 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


VO 4-2331 C. Frank Bentley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Hazel Green 


East Bernstadt 


VI 3-2265 Clark E. Chesnut 


Holbert Hodges 


Lily 


Lily 


4-4330 R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


VO 4-2181 Leighton Watkins 
REGION 13 


Gilbert Samples 


D.49Annvme Inst. 


Annville 


EM 4-2865 Roland Simmelink 


Jerry Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


LY 8-3737 Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thurman 


McKee 


McKee 


AT 7-2631 Walter H. Power 


Charles Norris 


Oneida 


Oneida 


VI 7-2202 David C. Jackson 


David C. Jackson 


Tyner 


Tyner 


EM 4-3170 James W. Wilson 


R. B. Morris 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Page Nine 



School 



Address 



TeL No. Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 50 Barbourville 
Corbin 

Knox Central 
Lynn Camp 
Pleasant View 
Poplar Creek 
Rockhold 
Williamsburg 
Woodbine 

D. 51 Bell County 

Henderson Settle. 

Lincoln 

Lone Jack 

Middlesborough 

Pineville 

Red Bird 

D. 52 Cumberland 
East Benham 
East Main Street 
Evarts 
Hall 
Harlan 
Loyall 

Pine Mountain 
Rosenwald 
Wallins 
West Main 



Barbourville 

Coi'bin 

Barbourville 

Corbin 

Pleasant View 

Carpenter 

Rockhold 

Williamsburg 

Woodbine 

Pineville 

Frakes 

Middlesborough 

Pour Mile 

Middlesborough 

Pineville 

Beverly 

Cumberland 

Benham 

Lynch 

Evarts 

Grays Knob 

Harlan 

Loyall 

Pine Mountain 

Harlan 

Wallins Creek 

Lynch 



LI 6-3129 Charles Singleton 
465 W. E. Burton 
6-4138 Clinton B. Hammons 
1633 P. M. Broughton 
3008 George E. Moses 
William H. Ball 
Warren Peace 
6500 H. B. Steely 
903 Robert L. Jones, Jr. 

ED 7-2329 James A. Pursifull 
7-3618 Robert Hendrickson 
862 Miss E. R. Ball 
ED 7-2435 Chester L. Click 
263 Shelvie Fuson 
7-2439 Effie Arnett 
ED 7-3300 P. P. Estridge 

589-4625 Lee P. Jones 
848-5583 D. C. Taylor 
848-5486 Ernest E. Smith 
77 Claude R. Dozier 
472-J Charles R. Steele 
522 Roy G. Teague 
277 Nicholas Brewer 
2700M Gema Campbell 
637 William M. Wood 
MO 4-3444 John H. Howard 
John V. Coleman 



H. D. Tye 
Harry Taylor 
Harold Cole 
Oscar Howard 
Clyde E. Hill 
Garrett Bennett 
Lane Gray Broyles 
Archie Powers 
Paul Rice 

Willie Hendrickson 
Wayland Jones 
A. M. McKinney 
G. B. Hendrickson 
Darrell Storm 
Orville Engle 
Ladel McFaden 

Fred Parsons 
Carman Weathers 
William Bosch 
Charles Hunter 
James G. Burkhart 
Bill Criscillis 
Charlie Davis 
Vernon Conley 
E. R. Gray 
James L. Howard 
Eugene Traylor 



D. 53 Dunham 


Jenkins 


Fleming-Neon 


Flemnig 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 


Letcher 


Letcher 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


D. 54 Buckhorn 


Buckhorn 


Dike Combs 


Jeff 


Hazard 


Hazard 


Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


D. 55 Breathitt 


Jackson 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


Cordia 


R. 2, Hazard 


Hindman 


Hindman 


Jackson 


Jackson 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


Oakdale Christian 


R. 1, Jackson 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


Lee County 


Beattyville 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


Powell County 


Stanton 


Wolfe County 


Campton 



REGION 14 

948 G. V. Curry 
7597 Roy T. Reasor 

243 Eldon E. Davidson 

I. L. Frazier 
2524 Jeff B. Mayes 
2339 J. M. Burkich 

GE 6-3649 Fred W. Johnson 
GE 6-2500 Homer Jones 
GE 6-3711 James Caudill 
OR 5-4431 Bingham Brashear 
Roscoe Turner 
6-4541 Paul H. Colwell 

NO 6-2805 Millard Tolliver 

MI 2-3585 Morton Combs 
Alice H. Slone 

ST 5-5361 Claude Frady 

NO 6-5164 J. B. Goff 

Edward Madden 
Willard Trepus 

NO 2-2475 Mrs. Heni-y A. Stovall 
IN 4-8126 Elbert Hudson 
LY 3-2815 W. O. Gabbard 
663-4475 Estil G. Chaney 
NO 8-3845 A. M. Richie 



William Webb 
Ralph Roberts 
Jim Summers 
Harold Cornett 
Henry Ed. Wright 
Don Burton 

Raymond Hamblin 
Bill Back 
Goebel Ritter 
Delano Combs 
R. B. Singleton 
Albert Combs 

Fairce Woods 
Morton Combs 
George Cornett 
Pearl Combs 
J. B. Goff 
Edward Madden 
David Tullar 

Joe Owens 
Harold E. Flynn 
John D. Seale 
William T. Orme 
Lando Lockard 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Address 



Tel. No. Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 57 Belfry 
Dorton 
Elkhorn City 
Feds Creek 
Hellier 
Johns Creek 
Mullins 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Virgie 

D. 58 Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Maytown 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 

D. 59 Blaine 

Flat Gap 

Inez 

Louisa 

Meade Memorial 

Paintsville 

Van Lear 

Warfield 

D. 60 Ezel 

Morgan County 
OU Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 



Belfry 

D orton 

Elkhorn City 

Feds Creek 

Hellier 

R. 1, Pikeville 

R. 1, Pikeville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Virgie 

Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Langley 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 

Blaine 
Flat Gap 
Inez 
Louisa 

Williamsport 
Paintsville 
Van Lear 
Warfield 

Ezel 

West Liberty 
Oil Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 



REGION 15 

EL 3-7362 W. F. Doane 

Charles Wright 

SK 4-6981 James V. Powell 
835-2286 Nelson Hamilton, Jr. 

SK 4-8184 Scotty M. Sterling 
Ouinten R. Howard 

GE 7-9194 Landon Hunt 

GL 6-9310 J. H. Cromer 

Charles E. Spears 
639-4774 Fred W. Cox 

TU 6-3383 Carl T. Home 
8-2255 D. W. Howard 
358-3461 Burnice Gearheart 
George L. Moore 
BU 5-3011 James W. Salisbury 

3346 Claude May 
TU 6-2252 Woodrow Allen 
James V. Bolen 
938-2110 Boone Hall 

GL 2-3624 Paul H. Gambill 
AM 5-2164 Virgil Porter 

Ftussell Williamson 
ME 8-4574 Don B. Bales 
789-5050 Harold L. Preston 
789-3881 Paul Wade Trimble 
789-4932 Hysell Burchett 
Russell H. Stepp 

PA 5-4545 Ezra Bach 
SH 3-3705 Ottis Murphy 
CY 7-3071 Willis H. Conley 
Creed Arnett 
Paul W. Polly 



James Hutchens 
Ronald Cui-ry 
Arthur Mullins 
Ernest L. Prater, Jr. 
Jack T. Castle 
Donnie Layne 
Gary Layne 
Jack Cunningham 
Carl P. Mims 
Virgil Osborne 

Bobby W. Wells 
Benny J. Fannin 
John Camnbell, Jr. 
Pete Grigsby 
Denzil Halbert 
Eugene Fvasure 
Jack F. Wells 
Tommy Boyd 
Don Wallen 

Roger A. Gambill 
Frank Perry 
Everette Horn, Jr. 
Joe P. Blankenship 
Howard W. Wallen 
Bruce McLin 
Howard Ramey 
John Marcum 

Henry Cochran 
Neil Hunley 
Paul Setser 
Leonard F. Carpenter 
Len Stiner 



D. 61 Caniargo 

Clark County 
DuBois 

Montgomery Co. 
Mt. Sterling 
St. Agatha Acad. 

D. 62 Breckinridge Tng. 
Menifee County 
Owingsville 
Rowan County 
Sharpsburg 

D. 63 Carter 
Hitchins 
Laurel 

Lewis County 
McKell 
Olive Hill 
Prichard 
South Portsmouth 

D. 64 Ashland 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Fail-view 

Greenup 

Holy Family 

Raceland 

Russell 

Wurtland 



Mt. Sterling 
Winchester 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Sterlnig 
Mt. Sterling 
Winchester 

Morehead 

Frenchburg 

Owingsville 

Morehead 

Sharpsburg 

Carter 

Hitchins 

Camp Dix 

Vanceburg 

South Shore 

Olive Hill 

Grayson 

South Portsmouth 

Ashland 

R. 2, Ashland 

Catlettsburg 

Ashland 

Greenup 

Ashland 

Raceland 

Russell 

Wurtland 



REGION 16 

1500 J. B. Cunningham 
PI 4-6111 Letcher Norton 

952 Arthur R. Hawkins 
266 Calvin Hunt 
956 Dawson Orman 
PI 4-6484 Sr. Caroline Mary 

ST 4-4181 Mrs. Hazel Whitaker 
SO 8-2373 Hiram C. Walters 
OR 4-2501 Edsel L. Karrick 
ST 4-4153 Russell Boyd 

Glynn D. Baucom 

474-6121 Thomas E. Phillips 
474-5784 Harold H. King 

SW 6-5191 William A. Carver 
Teddy Applegate 

YE 2-3323 Cliff Lowdenback 
326-4591 John C. Stringer 
474-5421 Max E. Calhoun 

YE 2-3221 Foster Meade 

324-5225 H. L. Ellis 
739-4428 Cobble Lee 
739-4663 Frank C. Burns 
324-9226 Webb Young 
473-3781 J. W. Harrell 
324-7040 Sr. Mary, CDP 
836-8221 H. R. Bowling 
836-8915 Frank V. Firestine 
836-5931 Ben Webb 



Julian Cunningham 
Letcher Norton 
William Elster 
Bob Crawford 
James Floyd 
J. Homer Fanning 

John E. Allen, Jr. 
Harr.v Howard 
Tom Evans 
Warren Cooper 
Jesse Mayabb 

Baxter McGlone 
Roy Murphy 
C. B. Richardson 
Howard Shumate 
Ed Moore 
Jack Fultz 
Harold Holbrook 
Jack Tackett 

Robert Wright 
Jim McKenzie 
Harold Barker 
Harold Tate 
George Arrington 
Jack Gossett 
Charles Morgan 
Marvin Meredith 
Charles Banks 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 

The first Abou Ben Adhem award of the 
New Year goes to Bruce Sweeney's Shelby 
County High School. This honor award 
goes to communities promoting good neigh- 
bor practices. Coach Bill Harrell and my old 
buddy, Bruce, can feel mighty proud of the 
words spoken by Official Al Gustafson, Jr., 
"Probably the most important part of their 
program is the wholesome atmosphere 
created which you feel prevailing from the 
time you enter until you leave." 

The first Corn Cob Pipe of 1962' honors 
Western Kentucky State College Coach Ted- 
dy Horntack. This award for unselfish 
service was merited by the "Blond Bomb- 
shell" for the work and leadership he gave 
to the promotion of wholesome year-around 
programs of recreation over Kentucky. Ted 
and President Kelly Thompson were lunch- 
eon hosts to state recreation leaders at the 
last meeting of these promoters of state- 
wide parks and recreation programs in 
Bowling Green. 

Among newspaper editors honored by 
tihe Dutchman's Corn Cob Pipes during the 
past year for the development of wholesome 
and sound philosophers of community parks 
and recreation development are Fred Wachs, 
Lexington; Ellis Easterly, Middlesboro, and 
Francele H. Armstrong of Henderson. 

The first two young scrappy athletes to 
receive Lionheart Awards in 1962 for over- 
coming physical handicaps to engage in 
sports are Bob Jones of Louisville and Mar- 
vin Hildenbrand of Brooksville. 

Coach Paul Gering of Trinity High in 
Louisville asked that Bob Jones be consider- 
ed for the Game Guy Award. Not only has 
he played football for the past four seasons 
but he also caught four touchdown passes 
this year. Bob was born without any fingers 
on his left hand. 

The Bracken County News called Marvin 
Hildenbrand to the Dutchman's attention. 
Presently Marvin is in the Shrine Hospital 
in Lexington. This lad is paralyzed from the 
hips down but he has the "Heart of a Lion." 
This young fighter often plays basketball 
using his wheel chair. He is a good dribbler 
and a credit to anybody's team. The Dutch- 
man reminds his Lexington friends that all 
of them can start this New Year feeling 
mighty fine by visiting Marvin. It was Jesus 
who first reminded all of us, "Even as much 
as ye do to the least of these ye do also unto 
me." 



With the turn of the year Louisvillians 
started preparations for an outstanding 
Hospitality Program for the 1962 Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association's annual 
basketball tournament scheduled in Louis- 
ville in March. With Jack Dawson, one of 
Jefferson County's outstanding young lead- 
ers taking the initiative, visitors will be serv- 
ed with a well-seasoned hospitality menu. 

Two more honors have come at the turn 
of the year to "Handsome Vic" Brizendine 
and "Dashing Ben" Edelen. The "Handsome 
One" was selected to officiate in the Orange 
Bowl Basketball Classic while the "Dashing 
One" hied himself away to the Sugar Bowl 
with his basketball whistle. Their selections 
reflect honor on Kentucky's Training Pro- 
gram for Officials. Ben and Vic both credited 
the K.H.S.A.A. basketball clinics and schools 
for officials for sound, fundamental training 
which has enabled them to progress in the 
officiating field. 

On the subject of officiating the Dutch- 
man has a multitude of requests asking that 
he clear up some existing confusion relative 
to the new substitution rule. 

Here's the question: A- knocks the ball 
out of bounds. Team A or Team B has a sub- 
stitute ready and entitled to enter. Should 
the Official stop the clock at a signal from 
the Scorer to permit the substitute to enter ? 

Here's the answer: YES. The new rule 
says that any time the ball is dead because 
of a violation the Official stops the clock at 
a signal from the Scorer to permit an eligible 
substitute to enter. Rule 9 :2 says it is a viola- 
tion for a player to cause the ball to go out 
of bounds. The wording of Play No. 137 in 
our Play Situation Book is in agreement 
with the rule although it is confusing unless 
studied carefully. 

No play situation ruling ever takes prece- 
dent over the rule book. If a time ever comes 
when an item in the play situation book con- 
tradicts or is in conflicct with the rule book 
then the Rule Book is The Book of Basket- 
ball. 

Boyer Jones is leading Taylor County and 
Campbellsville down the recreation path. In 
January, the civic leaders, headed by Boyer, 
will meet to plan a county-wide recreation 
program — Kentucky's communities are on 
the move. 

Within the last six weeks both the New 
York Times and This Week magazine has 
sent writers to Kentucky to get stories of 
the Flying Dutchman's projects — all this 
rush after more than ten years of operation ! 
(Continued on Page Fifteen) 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



FAIRDALE— CLASS AAA REGION II WINNER 




(Left to Ri^ht) Front Row: Burt Hornback. Roeer MoUins. Jim Fisher. Andy Weston. Eugene Matheny. Tom Jones. 
Charles Mudd. Jim Groves, Charles Wood. Larry Price. Bill Barnsfather. Pat Foster, Don Brinklev. Ronnie Gaffney, 
Leon Williams, Loyd Gardner. Second Row: Mgr. Eddie Hail, Mffr. Paul Frve. Arthur Shake. Glenn Miller, 



Huber, Corky Cox, Paul PulU 
Norman Ritchie, Robert Owen, Terry Williar 
Lobb, Loyd Harris, Tom Miller, Gary Nelson 
Tony Hildabrandt, Roy Eiler, Larry Roberts, 
pott. Al Abro. Kenny Corder. 



Dayid Goben, John Baker. Gary Stinson. Bill Ritchie. Jim Stillwell, 

IS. Bob Eiler. Mgr. Don Churchman. Gary Brvant. Third Row: Barry 

Baddy Doyle. Don Taylor. Edwin Phelp.s. Jerry Callahan. John Josnson, 

Earl Martin. Richard Jagers. Jerrv Mills. Chester Payton. Eddie Phil- 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

scorer blows his horn after the ball has become dead 
because of the traveling: violation and the official 
signals time-out and beckons the substitute to enter. 
Is there a likelihood that six players from team B will 
be on the court when the ball is thrown in and is 
there a likelihood that team B will secure the ball for 
a fast throw-in, thus catching their opponents un- 
prepared ? 

Ruling: It is the accepted practice for the official 
to secure the ball whenever the clock is stopped and 
to not return it to a player for a throw-in until con- 
ditions are in order for the ball to again become 
alive. This procedure is not specifically covered in 
the rules but it is accepted as good mechanics. In this 
case, that is, if the throw-in is from B's back court, 
it is not necessary that the official actually hand the 
ball to the player making the throw-in, but it would 
be advisable to do so and it is recommended that, in 
any situation in which a substitution is made or in 
which the clock has been stopped, the official hand 
the ball to the player making the throw-in. This, it 
seems, practically eliminates and certainly prevents 
many chances for an error. The official certainly will 
not permit team B to grab the ball for a quick throw- 
in before the official is ready and assured that play 
can be resumed without handicapping either team. 

36. Play: Al is dribbling the ball in the back 
court. While he is dribbling the ball, Bl bats the ball 
so that it is deflected out of the reach of Al. Al then 
recovers the ball. Does the ten-second count continue? 

Ruling: Team control has not been disturbed as a 
result of the action by Bl, therefore, the ten-second 
count continues. 

37. Play: Al is awarded a free throw, is basket 
is at the end of the floor opposite team A's bench. Al 
goes to sideline to receive instruction from his coach 
before attempting the free throw. 

Ruling: Referee will place ball at the disposal of 
Al by putting it on the floor at the free throw line 
and then immediately begin his ten-second count. If 



Al fails to make attempt before ten seconds have ex- 
pired, Al has committed a violation. Under no condi- 
tion should official delay placing the ball at the dis- 
posal of Al, rather, he should place the ball at the 
disposal of Al as soon as possible. 

38. Play: What is the width of the lane space 
on the free throw lane ? 

Ruling: The first lane space is seven feet wide and 
the second space is three feet wide. The width of lane 
spaces other than the first and second spaces is not 
specified. It is understood that a player along the 
free throw lane in other than the first or second lane 
spaces should have enough room to be unhindered. A 
player in a space of undesignated width might use 
less than three feet. Players of team A and team B 
are entitled to alternate spaces, but it is not man- 
datory that they alternate. If a space next to an A 
player is not utilized by a B player, a teammate of 
the A player may occupy it. 

39. Play: (a) S6; or (b) S6 and S7 have reported 
to the scorer and are entitled and ready to enter. Al 
commits a violation. The scorer sounds the horn. The 
official stops the clock and beckons the substitute 
or substitutes to enter. In (a), S6 indicates he has 
changed his mind and returns to his bench, or in (b), 
S6 enters the court but S7 indicates he will not enter 
the game at this time. 

Ruling: Delay of game in both (a) and (b). 
Technical foul. Substitutes who have reported and are 
entitled to enter the game shall do so promptly when 
beckoned by an official. However, if a substitute is to 
replace a free thrower or a jumper, he shall not enter 
until the next dead ball and time-out. 

40. Play: Al commits a violation. No substitute 
has reported to the scorer. Bl violates during the 
throw-in, after which the scorer sounds his horn, 
signaling a substitute has reported. 

Ruling: The substitution is denied. The official will 
not permit a substitute to enter during the dead ball 
following a violation unless the substitute or sub- 
stitutes have reported and are ready to enter when 
the ball frist becomes dead because of a violation. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 19S2 



Pae:e Thirteen 



TEMPLE HILL-BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Carroll Walden, Bob Richardson, Ronnie Taylor, Jim Thompson, Doair Depp, Dale 
Payne, Marvin Martin, Doug Goode. Second Row : Ass't. Coach Borden, Mgr. Billy Renean, Bnd Tarry, Panl 
Nuckols, Larry Compton, James Clemmons. Bill Bewley, Msr. Benny McGuire, Coach Bob Pardne. Third Row: 
Joe Lewis, Danny Richardson, Leslie Harlow, Jimmy Poore, Phillip Garrett, Terry Denham, LeRoy Payne. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of CoEtrol of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Kentucky 
Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday morning-, December 16, 
1961, The meeting- was called to order by President 
W. H. Crowdus at 10:00, with Board membsrs Jack 
Dawson, K. G, Gillaspie, Preston Holland, Don R, 
Rawlings, Oran C. Teater, and Cecil A. Thornton; 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J, B, Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the reading of the minutes of the September 30th 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the 1961 football 
championship had been very successful, although in- 
clement weather had affected adversely ticket sales 
for the Class A and Class AA final games played on 
November 23. He stated that ticket sales for the two- 
game session in Lexington amounted to $5,490.00, and 
that Association profits realized from the Class AAA 
final game in Louisville were approximately $1,500.00, 
Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that each of the four teams participating in the play- 
offs at Lexington be allowed an additional amount of 
$200.00 for incidental expenses. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner was authorized to poll the 
principals of Class A and Class AA football schools 
in areas not currently having regions divided into 
districts, to determine their wishes concerning the 
setting up of football districts, possibly no earlier 
than 1963. 

The Commissioner presented a request from Prin. 
W. L. Holloway, Madison High School, Richmond, to 
allow his school to ba reclassified in Class A for 1962. 
The Boai-d declined to reclassify the Madison High 
School at this time, calling attention to the fact that, 
when the football regulations were first adopted, it 
was decided that the classification of schools should 
be for two-year periods. The first classification was 
for the seasons of 1959 and 1960, the second for 1961 
and 1962. Attention was also called to the fact that 
the following appears in the original regulations: 



"Any school placed in a higher classification must 
remain in this classification until all schools are 
reclassified." 

The Commissioner recommended that the 1962 
regulations in swimming hi the same as the 1961 
regulations, with the Swimming Committee being 
given authority to make any necessary adjustments 
in the classes and events. K. G. Gillaspie moved, 
seconded by Jack Dawson, that the recommendation 
of the Commissioner be accepted and adopted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion of the medical clinics 
currently being sponsored by the Kentucky State 
Medical Association and the K. H. S. A. A. Jack 
Dawson moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that the 
Commissioner work with the Kentucky State Medical 
Association, setting up additional necessary clinics 
for 1962. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner announced the appointment by 
President Crowdus of a State Rifle Marksmanship 
Committee composed of the following men: Colonel 
Leslie C. Blankinship, M.M.I., Chairman; Prin. James 
H. Powell, University High School; and Prin. R. L. 
Grider, Bryan Station High School. The Commissioner 
stated that this committee had meet in the K.H.S.A.A. 
office on November 14, 1961, and that plans were 
going forward for a state championship meet in rifle 
marksmanship, to be held at M.MJ. in three sections 
on successive Saturdays in May, 1962. 

Chairman Cecil A. Thornton of the Trophy Com- 
mittee reported that his committee had met "at the 
K.H.S.A.A. office on November 4, 1961, at which 
time sealed bids for the 1962 district and regional 
basketball tournament trophies were opened, and 
samples submitted by six bidders were examined. Mr. 
Thornton stated that new style trophies in both cate- 
gories had been selected. Regional trophies presented 
by the Sport Shop, Glasgow, Kentucky, were selected, 
at a price of $60.00 per set; and the district trophies 
supplied by the Southland Sport Shop, Lexington, 
Kentucky, were the choice of the committee, at a 
price of $38.93 per set. 

There was a general discussion concerning the 
possibility of decreasing the number of basketball 
games allowed during the regular season and the 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



limiting of the number of games played on nights 
preceding school days. President Crowdus asked the 
Policy Committee to give its attention to proposals 
concerning these probable desirable changes in Assoc- 
iation regulations, reporting to the Board at its next 
meeting. 

January 20, 1962, was set tentatively for the next 
meeting of the Board of Control, scheduled to be held 
in Louisville. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater, that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning September 30, 1961, and ending December 
15, 1961, be allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 

Conference Standings 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 



Temple Hill 

Caverna 

Gamaliel 

Austin-Tracy 

Hiseville 

Park City 



Won 

9 

8 
5 
4 
2 
1 



Lost 



1 

5 
6 



Tied 

1 
1 








Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

Eminence 8 

Paint Lick 6 2 

Perryville 5 3 

Burgin 4 4 

Berea 2 5 

Camp Dick Robinson 2 5 

Mt. Vernon 8 

Central Kentucky Conference 



DIVISION I 

6 
6 



Shelbyville 

Versailles 

Paris 

Danville 4 

Hem-y Clay 2 

Cynthiana 3 

Harrodsburg 2 

Carlisle 1 

Irvine 

Millersburg Mihtary Inst. 2 

DIVISION II 

Madison 8 

Mt. Sterling 5 

Georgetown 6 

Somerset 2 

Lancaster 4 

Anderson 4 

StarLford 2 

Jessamine County 3 

Frankfort 



23.00 
21.50 
21.00 
21.00 
16.00 
15.00 
12.50 
11.43 
10.00 
N.R. 

24.00 
18.61 
18.33 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.00 
13.33 
10.63 



Cumberland Valley Conference 



Lynch East Main 

Cumberland 

Evarts 

Loyall 

Hall 

Walllns 



Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Hazard 6 

Fleming-Neon 6 10 



Belfry 

Jenkins 

Napier 

Whitesburg 

Prestonsburg 

Pikeville 

Elkhorn City 

Wheelwright 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 



Elizabethtown 
Bardstown 
Lebanon 
St. Joseph 
Fort Knox 
Old Ky. Home 
Springfield 
Shepherdsville 



27.50 
21.20 
20.00 
18.00 
17.50 
13.30 
10.00 
10.00 



Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Catlettsburg 

McKell 

Wurtland 

Louisa 

Raceland 

Russell 



Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 



Highlands 

Boone County 

Newport 

Ludlow 

Bellevue 

Dixie Heights 

Beechwood 

Campbell County 

Holmes 

Lloyd 

Dayton 



30.00 
22.50 
19.94 
16.66 
15.55 
15.00 
15.00 
14.44 
14.00 
11.87 
10.55 



Southeastern Kentucky Conference 



Corbin* 
Pineville 
Bell County 
Williamsburg- 
Knox Central 
Harlan 
Barbourville 
Hazel Green 
London 
Middlesboro 
Lynn Camp 



30.00 
22.50 
22.50 
19.07 
16.00 
15.00 
15.00 
13.75 
13.75 
13.33 
13.33 



Did not play enough to qualify for title 



Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Murray 
Mayfield 

Owensboro Catholic 
Caldwell County 
Russellville 
Hopkinsville 
Bowling Green 
Trigg County 
Franklin Simpson 
Fulton 
Providence 
Crittenden County 



7 





1 


21.43 


6 


2 





20.71 


3 








20.00 


5 


2 





19.17 


3 


4 





14.29 


3 


4 





14.29 


3 


5 





13.75 


3 


5 





13.75 


2 


4 





13.33 


1 


3 





12.50 


1 


4 





12.00 





7 





10.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Page Fifteen 



CATLETTSBURG-NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 

i _ ■ ■ ■ J- 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. (Dropped). 53 (Dropped), Jim Adkins, Grady Walter, Roger Moore, Dennis 
WilUamson, David Davidson, Mgr. Larry Crank. Second Row: John Swim, Larry Lee, David Robinette, Ken 
Stanton, Alva Chaf fin, Jim Preston, Jerry Heaberlin, Jim Croach. Third Row : Coach Harold Barker, Jack 
Marnsh, 62 (Dropped), Joe Stewart. Ken Leibee, David Bnrke, Bill Ross, Joe Nunlcy, Bob Craycraft, Jim 
Hammond, Mgr. (Dropped). Fourth Row: Joe Mellon, Paul Benard, Jim Shivel. 70 (Dropped), Warren Dixon, 
John Bates, Mike McKngiht, Walter Rice. 



In Memoriam 

DELBERT R. WALDEN 

Delbert R. WaWen, 42, Athletic Direc- 
tor of the Grant County High School for the 
past three years, died of a heart attack at 
his home near Williamstown on December 
26, 1961. Mr. Walden had not been ill pre- 
viously, and only two weeks before had taken 
an Air Force Physical examination, A veter- 
an of three years in the Air Force in World 
War II, he was a captain in the 8381st Air 
Force Reserve Recovery Unit, Cincinnati. 

Mr. Walden began his career as teacher 
and basketball coach in 1946-47 at the Cor- 
inth High School. He was teacher and coach 
at Williamstown High School from 1947 to 
1955, and from 1955 to 1958 at the Grant 
County High School. His 1957 basketball 
team advanced to the state tournament as 
winner of the eighth region. 

A graduate of Western Kentucky State 
College, Mr. Walden received his M.A. de- 
gree from the University of Kentucky. He 
taught married couples' class at the Wil- 
liamstown Methodist Church. 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mary Fran- 
ces Matheny Walden; twin sons, Gregory 
and Geoffrey Walden, at home; his mother, 
Mrs. Leslie T. Walden, and a brother Denver 
Walden, Williamstown. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Eleven) 
What's happening? 

As the brand New Year of 1962 is in- 
itiated the Dutchman passes along this 
thought to you : "A fellow who is too busy to 
pray is too busy." 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers arc given, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Begley, Jack, 1502 Florence St., Middletown. Ohio, GA 3-4279, 

GA 2-2711 Ext. 659 
Bisig, Cliff, 2419 Broadmeade Rd., Louisville, GL 4-3797, 

ME 7-8717 
Blanton. Bob, Elm Street, Harlan, 883 
Brooks, Edwin C, Route 2. Henderson, JE 3-6245 
Burkeen, Eulane, 666 Highland Blvd., Paducah, 442-6674 
Carr, Gene Pogue, 3223 Hackworth St., Ashland, 324-8666 
Cornett, Roland, 207 Keller St., Cumberland 

Cotton, James L., 109 South Alves St., Henderson, VA 7-1043 
Creech, Harvey, Cumberland 

Dick, Clellan E., 708 Buffington St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dickerson, William B., 2417 Yuma Court, Lexington, 7-7969 
Doll, Louis E., 5366 Rapid Run Road, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

BL 1-0304, PO 1-4210 
Doyle, Ronald J., 315 Linden Walk, Box A-126, Lexington, 

2-2200 Ext. 2470 (Bus.) 
Ellis, Johnny, Prestonsburg. TU 6-2751, TU 6-3080 
Fenton, Don, 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati 27, Ohio 
Foster, Dallas, Mt. Washington, KE 8-4850 
Goodin, Charles L., 216 Summit Dr., Pineville, ED 7-3265, 

ED 7-2151 
Green, Joseph E., Route 6, Murray, PL 3-2834 
Green, Walter, Box 38, Pikeville 
Grooms. Roger, 3111 Linwood. Cincinnati, Ohio, TR 1-2498, 

BE 1-3600 
Hahn, James N., West Main St., Greenville, 712, 212 
Hale, James J., 214 Sycamore St., Lexington, 6-5783 
Haynes, Ohlin, 7810 Bitteroot Lane, Cincinnati 24, Ohio 
Heath, Lary D., 2121 St. Michael. Lexington, 6-8925, 6-1819 
Hobbs, Fred L., 501 Warwick Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-8209, 

MU 3-2401 
Horine, James J., 141 Romany Road. Lexington. 6-5352, 6-5352 
Hughes, Charles, Wayland, 358-4040 
Ingraham, Gary J., 1030 Greenleaf Road, Louisville, ME 7-2755, 

TW 7-2815 



Fag-e Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1962 



Jahnigen, Robert. 6007 Red Bank, Cincinnati 13. Ohio. 791-2345 
Jones, Walter C. 2047 Powers St.. Cincinnati 23, Ohio 
Jones, Daniel R., Cleaton, Central City 1586-J, 497 
Jordan, A. Larry, Paris 

Kilgore, Bob. Route 1. Lafollette. Tenn.. OR 5-3021 
Kilgore. Winston, Route 1, Lafollette, Tenn., OR 5-3021 
Lacer, Stanley D., Box 97. Spottsville, VA 7-5926, VA 7-9444 
Lee, Charles J.. 315 Scott St.. Lexington, 2-3003, Versailles 

TR 3-4701 
Madden, McElroy, 463 Lindingberg Drive, Lexington, 4-3604 
Maynard, Andrew J.. Matewan, W. Va. 
Miller, John Lee. 21 A Street. Winchester 
Montgomery. Joe. Route 2. Mt. Olivet. Carlisle 574J1 
Parker. Monroe, Isabelle St., Norton, Va. 
Ratlifl. Charles R., Ironton High School. Ironton. Ohio 
Richardson. Ralph, Box T6J & Brocton, Richmond 
Riggs. William T., 103 West McElroy St. Morganfield 
Riley. James R.. 560 Winter St.. Box 189. Russellville, PA 

6-6574, PA 6-7212 
Rouse, W. L., Jr.. 1820 Bimini, Lexington, 6-3546, 3-3667 
barakatsannis. Panny, 79 Bivouac, Fort Thomas, HI 1-0369. 

HI 1-0369 
Saylor. Needham. Cumberland, Wallins Creek MO 4-3569 
Schmitt, Paul E., 602 South 40th St., Louisville 11. SP 8-5355. 

ME 5-5246 
Sheffer, Darrell, 1725 Winding Way, Owensboro. MU 4-4891. 

MU 3-3505 
Staggs, Gerald, Somerset, 678-8834 
Strader, James, Jr.. Belton 

Taylor. D. C. Box 176. Benham. 848-2284. 848-5406 
ToIIe, Charles W., 207 South Elmarch Ave.. Cynthiana. 1960, 300 
Vanover James E.. 337 North Hall. Western Ky. St Col 

Bowling Green. VI 2-1820 Room 337 
Wettlg. Clifford. 962 Helen St.. Milford. Ohio 

All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Logsdon, Caverna; Matthews, Hiseville 

Guards: Thompson, Temple Hill; Pitcock, 

Gamaliel. 

Center: Nunn, Caverna. 

Backs: Shockley, Gamaliel; Depp, Temple Hill; 

Lindsey, Cavenia. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Mills, Austin-Tracv; Spivey, Gamaliel 

Guards: Thompson, Temple Hill; Nunn, Caverna. 

Linebackers: Bewley, Temple Hill; Crowe 

Gamaliel. 

Safety: Gillard, Park City; Wilson, Caverna. 
Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

Gordon, Martin, Roberts and Tarry of Eminence; 
Moore and Prewitt of Camp Dick Robinson; Matherly 
Denny and Walls of Burgin; Smith and Riley of 
Perryyille; West, Chadwell and Bony of Paint Lick- 
Kendricks, Mt. Vernon; Boggs, Berea. 

Central Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Cooper, Stanford; Ladenburger, Millers- 
burg Military Institute; Tennill, Shelbyville; Wilson 
Georgetown. 

Tackles: Caldwell, Danville; Congleton, Madison- 
Deweese, M.M.I. ; McBride, Shelbyville. 

Guards: Bryant, Anderson; Evins and Hines of 
Somerset; Withers, Versailles. 

Centers: Bell, Frankfort; Tucker, Cynthiana. 

Backs: Ballow and Todd of Madison; Kash, Mt. 
bterhng; .ludy, Henry Clay; White, Harrodsburg; 
Edwards, Danville; Raider, Versailles; Bradley, Shelby- 
ville. 

Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends: Granada, Cumberland; Howard, Loyall. 
Tackles: R. McGeorge, East Main; Farmer, Hall. 
Guards: T. McGeorge, East Main; Meeks, Evarts. 
Center: Scott, Cumberland. 

Backs: Cain, Cumberland; Jameson and PursifuU 
of Loyall; Watts and Owens of East Main; 
Goins and Toby of Evarts. 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Kestner, Belfry; Pack, Jenkins. 



Tackles: Stambaugh, Fleming-Neon; Stamper, 
Whitesburg. 

Guards: Fitzpatrick, Prestonsburg; Caudill, Haz- 
ard. 

Center: Tackett, Fleming-Neon. 
Backs: Hatfield, Balfry; Nunnery, Prestonsburg; 
Ratliff, Pikeville; Toll'ivei-. Flem"ing-Neon. 

Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Simpson, Lebanon; Conley, Ft. Knox. 
Tackles: O'Daniel, Leba.Ton; Miles, St. Joseph; 
Hayden, Bardstown. 

Guards: Coyne, Ft. Knox; Greenwell, Bardstown. 
Center: Fulkerson, Old Kentucky Home. 
Backs: McGinnis and Hicks of St. Joseph; Phelps, 
Old Ky. Home; Pruitt, Bardstown; Wilson, Leban- 
on; Rosenborough, Ft. Knox. 

Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Boyles, Gilliam and Vanover of McKell; David- 
son, McKnight and Burke of Cattlettsburg; Gum- 
bert and Rose of Wurtland; Salters, Louisa; 
Woolery, Russell; Salyers, Raceland. 

Defensive Team: 

Riggs, Smith and Bentley of McKell; Dixon, 
Moore and Bernard of Catlettsburg; Bellew and 
Bradford of Wurtland; Ball, Louisa; Slater, 
Russell; Greenslait, Raceland. 
Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Goode, Boone Co.; Walls, Ludlow; 
Schweitzer, Campbell Co. 

Tackles: Moore, Highlands; Young, Ludlow; 
Miles, Newport; Turner, Bellevue. 
Guards: Steele, Dixie Heights; Saunders, Camp- 
bell Co.; Bryant, Bellevue; Smith, Highlands; 
Thompson, Boone Co. 

Centers: Jackson, Holmes; Reif, Highlands. 
Halfbacks: Hamilton, Boone Co.; Brown, New- 
port; Meyer, Ludlow; Spivey, Bellevue. 
Fullbacks: McGraw, Highlands; Stahley, Dixie 
Heights. 

Quarterbacks: Walz, Highlands; Hoffman, Boone 
County. 
Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Cornelius, Williamsburg; New, Corbin. 

Tackles: Nighbert, Williamsburg; Smith, Pine- 

ville. 

Guards: Bryant, Williamsburg; Handy, London. 

Center: Lane, Williamsburg. 

Backs: Bird, Corbin: Greenlee, Williamsburg; 

Elliott, Bell County; Trountman, Knox Central. 

Defensive Team: 

Ends: Cornelius, Williamsburg; New, Corbin. 
Tackles: Buhl, Williamsburg; Smith, Pineville. 
Guard: Root, Corbin. 

Backs: Stanfill and Greenlee of Williamsbui-g; 
Burton and Bird of Corbin; Gray, Barbourville; 
Elliott, Bell County. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 
Ends: Mallory, Caldwell County; Burnette, Ful- 
ton; Overton, Tilghman; Houston, Franklin- 
Simpson; Durston, Bowling Green. 
Tackles: Moody, Franklin-Simpson; Wright, 
Tilghman; Mitchell, Caldwell County, Futrell, 
Murray. 

Guards: Mengel, Tilghman; Workman, Murray; 
Wells, Mayfield; Gentry, Bowling Green. 
Centers: Sharp, Mayfield; Patton, Franklin- 
Simpson. 

Backs: Johnson, Russellville; Hall, Bowling 
Green; Williams, Robertson and Wells of Murray; 
Smith and Laird of Mayfield; Bryant and Rose 
of Tilghman. 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Lexington, Ky. 

School Representative 

FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 

Phone Triangle 3-3623 

Distributors of: 

Spanjian (Eastern Ky. only) Bike 

Southern Cramer 

Nocona Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wilson Wigwam Socks 

Spalding Butwin Jackets 

Rawlings Adirondack Bats 

Voit Trophies 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky, E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters Riddell Helmets & Shoes 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 7-3977 Dick Wallace 



WATCH FOR THE 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR 

1962-63 COVERAGES 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 

^ke. KUufden Gomfia*uf general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



(pi 



v'i 



4. 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following : 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

No. ARX Last Bilt ball official at University of Kentucky. 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament _^ 

in Louisville. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delivery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play and the dial type 
DeLuxe FD-60 Fair-Play in our warehouse ready for immediate shipment. 
A call will get them to your gymnasium before tournament time. 
Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL. ED HENDLEY or C. A. BYRN, JR. are al- 
ways ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




We SHiPlHe DaVYou BuV i 



#■ 





High School Athlete 



Class AAA State Champion Flaget 




(Left to Right) Front Ko« : r)enn> Lucas, Ferd Lindauer. Charles Stuber, Al Stciser, Robert 
Brower, Pat Rigs*'. Kenny Richards, Kino Miller, Jim Kelly, Norb Elbert, T'hil Mathis, Mike 
Hansford. Second l{o« : Billie Mattinob, Norman Callahan, Mike Gone, Pat Thorpe, .John 
Wilder, Ron Marks, Dick Conpl>, Tom Lfhmann, Ray Crable, Bob Talber, Bob Wolf. Third 
Row: Don Ansert, Mel Hobbs, Sam Ryan, Bob Roddy, Arthur Alexander, Tom Ferriell, Stan 
Weihe, Joe Washington, Joe Schuler, Frank Sellinger, Joe Schmidt, Jerome Spalding. Fourth 
Row: William Stanton, Bill Bouchard, Darryl Lillie, James Gadberrj, Bob Robertson, Bob Casey, 
Jim Montgomery, Ray Kemper, Rick Norton, Bob Wessel, George Pearl, Charles Ilorrell. 




Flaget 33— Shawnee 14 
Flaget 38— DeSales 9 
Flaget 21— Trinity 
Flaget 20— Male 
Flaget 16— Central 
Flaget 14 — Manual 12 



Flaget 40— Purcell 20 
Flaget 27— Father Ryan 13 
Flaget 29— Fern Creek 14 
Flaget 27— St. Xavier 6 
Flaget 41— Fairdale 13 



'r. 



f 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
FEBRUARY- 1962 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the De- 
partment of Extension, University of Kentucky. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of 
Audio-Visual Materials. 

Swimmingf 
AQUATIC ARTISTRY, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving exhibition by Harold 
Smith, an Olympic champion. Slow motion photog- 
raphy brings out clearly various points in Smith's 
techniques, 
BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and be- 
neath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land and 
water drills involving kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with the arm are 
practiced separately, then coordinated as the swimmer 
learns the American crawl. The back float, back stroke, 
and breast stroke are also illustrated and explained. 
BRESAT STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-.i-s-c-a, $1.50 

This film pi'esents the conventional breast stroke 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 
CRAWL STROKE,e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in 
this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breath- 
ing are demonstrated. This film also includes slow 
motion shots under water. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: The 
hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, proper 
arm action, correct way of landing on the feet, proper 
takeoff and lift, correct entry into the water. The 
backward dive is also taught, including lift, arching 
the body, and entry into the water. The motion is 
stopped at various points to enable detailed study of 
form. 
DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and 
carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce 
the new swimming technique known as the dolphin 
or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body movements used 
in the dolphin kick, the film stresses the importance 
of practice for mastery of this efficient speedy kick, 
1955 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL, A, A, SWIM- 
MING MEET, j-s-c-a, 2 reel, silent, $,75 

Highlights of the meet and championship heats 
are shown in the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won the 
Class A title for the ninth consecutive year. Univers- 
ity High of Lexington won the Class B and Bellevue 
the Class C 
SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Army Air Force at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burning 
oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruction 
and for safety classes as well as for general programs. 

Baseball 
Baseball All-Star Game of 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, 
$.75 

The All-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American and 
National League are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are shown 
as the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 
Baseball All-Star Game of 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, 
$.75 

Twenty-five all stars from the American League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close ups of the baseball 
stars of today and interesting plays of the game are 
shown in the film. (KHSAA) 
Baseball By The Code, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $,75 

This picture gives an official interpretation of the 
rules and a demonstration of game administration by 



situations are demonstrated by high school, college. 
Umpires from the Major and Minor Leagues, Play 
and professional players. Correct pitching procedure, 
interference and obstruction, live and dead ball, trap 
plays, infield fly, and strike zone are illustrated. 
Baseball Hall of Fame, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film shows the annual meeting at Coopers- 
town, New York, when new names are added to the 
Hall of Fame list. Numerous stars of the past return 
to the shrine each year at this time and are shown 
as their feats on the diamond are related. The history 
of Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of Fame 
are explained in the picture. 
Batter Up, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 Min.) color, $,75 

Produced by National and American Leagues of 
Baseball, Shows the proper techniques of batting as 
demonstrated by hitting stars of the majors, Stan 
Musial, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, 
Willie Mays and others. 
Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and follow-through are clearly 
demonstrated in this film by professional players. 
The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1,00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 
Catching In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1,50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. 
Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
enable the viewer to follow each step or movement in 
each of the basic skills. 
Catching Stars of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $,75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching 
of catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining 
Correct methods and techniques of receiving, throw- 
ing, signalling and fielding are illustrated by Bill 
Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and Roy Camp- 
anella. 
Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $,75 

The purpose of this film is for fui'ther develop- 
ment of young baseball players in our modern de- 
mocracy and illustrates this through sports and sports 
competition. This film includes a brief history of 
baseball along with a cavalcade of past and present 
stars. 
Double-Play Kings of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and graphically the basic funda- 
mentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, 
legs, hips, shoulders, amis, and head is explained. How 
to select a bat, how to hold it, and correct batting 
positions are shown. 
Infield Play at 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield play 
at first and third base are illustrated by big league 
players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, 
etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Sponsored by A. 
G. Spalding Co., The American and National Leagues. 
Inside Baseball, j-s-, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding and base-running, are demonstrated. 

1955 Kentucky High School A, A, Baseball Tourna- 

ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $,75 
duPont Manual defeated Hall High School for the 
championship by a score of 13-3, All the final game 
is shown in color, 

1956 Kentucky High School A, A. Baseball Tourna- 

ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 
Group pictures and action shots of the eight teams 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV — NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1962 



$1.0U Pel- Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The National Alliance Football Committee and the 
exec-utive officers of the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations met at the Statler- 
Hilton Hotel, St. Louis, Missouri, durino- the period of 
January 3-6, 1962. The Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association was renresented at the two meetings by 
Ath. Dir. Edgar McNabb, Beechwood High School, 
football clinic director; Assistant Commissio.'^er J. B. 
Mansfield and Director Oran C. Teater. Meetings of 
the football rules committee were held in the morn- 
ings and afternoons of Wednesday and Thursday. 
Meetings of the executive officers were held on Fri- 
day evening- and Saturday morning. 

Executive Secretary Clifford B. Fagan of the 
National Federation has summarized the more im- 
portant rules modifications and revisions adopted by 
the 1962 National Alliance Football Committee, and 
has included a brief report of matters discussed. Mr. 
Pagan's report follows: 

The agenda for the opening session included sev- 
eral exceedingly informative and interesting presen- 
tations. 

The Missouri State High School Activities Assoc- 
iation Past-President, C. E. Potter, bade the Commit- 
tee welcome and reported that his Association was 
very pleased the Committee was meeting in its state. 
He complimented the Committee on its progressive 
record and its consistent action in the interest of the 
welfare of the participant. 

The Committee's Chairman, S. F. Burke, present- 
ed the National Federation's Executive Committee 
(Section 1, Northeast, John J. F. Ruddy; Section 2, 
East Central, H. A. Meyer; Section 4, Central, R. R. 
Watson; Section 5, Southwest, D. W. McBride; Sec- 
tion 6, Northwest, John V. Bernard; Section 7, West 
Ray J. Lofton). Mr. Burke outlined the "ground rules" 
for the conduct and procedure of the meeting. He re- 
viewed the responsibility of the various Sub-Commit- 
tees and called the group's attention to the fact that 
"safety has been the first consideration of this Com- 
mittee over the years and I am sure that it still is." 
He reiterated the Committee's interest in any im- 
provement which will make the game safer and em- 
phasized that, while safety has been the foremost 
objective and will continue to be, it was necessary 
that proposals should be examined carefully in light 
of experience and urged that the Committee not be 
"stampeded" into some quick action which might 
tend to tear down what has been built up over the 
years. He also pointed out that participation in the 
rules meeting and representation on the Committee 
carries with it the obligation to follow the rules as 
adopted unless the specific state or organization is 
authorized to conduct an experiment. When a state or 
organization adopts the rules they are adopted with- 
out reservation and are to be followed exactly, ex- 
cept where an experiment is authorized. No state or 
organization participating- in the formation of the 
rules has the right to set aside any of them. 

Mr. Cecil Patterson, Football Coach at Southeast 
High School, Kansas City, Missouri, discussed "Why 



the Football Rules are Changed" in a most interest- 
ing and humorous manner. Mr. Patterson drew from 
his long experience as coach and from his wide ac- 
quaintanceship with the game to explain how in- 
genious and imaginative coaches and players frequent- 
ly find loopholes in the rules which require the Com- 
mittee to take action to preserve the game as intend- 
ed. 

"Problems Relating to the Prevention of Injuries 
in Sports" was very ably presented by Dr. Allan 
Ryan, immediate Past-Chairman, American Medical 
Association's Committee on the Medical Aspects of 
Sports. Dr. Ryan discussed the nature of football in- 
juries and suggested possible solutions for the reduc- 
tion and elimination of them. He pointed out that a 
careful pi'eseason examination and medical super- 
vision of team members was very important. It was 
his contention that almost everyone feels some im- 
provements could be made in the football headgear 
and he urged a modification of the face guard, to 
prevent it from being used as an offensive weapon 
or a defensive aid. From time to time some rules be- 
come outmoded or there are voids in the codes because 
of changing styles of play on both offense and de- 
fense. The curtailment of the use of the elbow as an 
offensive weapon is absolutely necessary if many 
injuries are to be eliminated. A very moving part of 
the Doctor's report had to do with sportsmanship and 
a sportsman's moral obligation to observe "not only 
the letter but the spirit of the rules." 

Dr. Richard C. Schneider, Neuro-Surgeon of the 
University of Michigan's Medical School, presented a 
most interesting and informative illustrated lecture, 
explaining possible causes and results of injuries to 
the spine. He suggested that there was a possibility 
that a change in the style of some equipment might 
reduce the injury hazard to the spinal cord in the 
cervical region. Injuries to the head and cervical 
spine have, for many years, made up the majority 
of very serious and fatal injuries. Progress is being 
made in detecting the exact cause of these serious 
injuries through the use of movies, pictures, and post- 
mortem examinations. Dr. Schneider pointed out that 
not only were the results of these studies going to be 
beneficial to the game of football but already they 
had made a significant contribution to the entire area 
of neuro-surgery. 

Mr. Perry Sandell, representing the American Den- 
tal Association, explained to the group that the A. D. 
A. has a very special interest in the field of mouth 
and tooth protection. On behalf of his Association, he 
congratulated the Alliance Committee for the leader- 
ship it has given the problem of elimniating injuries 
to the teeth and mouths of football players. He report- 
ed that it seemed most important that the basic re- 
quirement for mouth protectors be maintained and 
added that "it may be desirable to modify the cur- 
rent rule to simply require the wearing- of an intra- 
oral mouth and tooth protector." This action by the 
Rules Committee would assure the protection of all 
boys for almost all mouth and teeth injuries and it 
would provide an opportunity for further study and 
experimentation by the manufacturers and others to 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



FEBRUARY, 1962 VOL. XXIV— NO. 7 

Pablished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIEUJ 

Lexingrton, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1968-62), Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville: Robert P. For- 
sythe (1969-63), Greenville: Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Oran 0. Teater (1960- 
64), PaJntsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1,00 Per Year 

.mliom the Commissionei s Cjfflce 

1962 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Fulton, (2) Heath, (3) Wingo, (4) 
Murray College, (5) Livingston Central, (6) 
Madisonville, (7) Christian County, (8) Todd 
County, (9) Providence, (10) Henderson, 
(11) Bremen, (12) Owensboro, (13) Meade 
County, (14) Butler County, (15) Beaver 
Dam, (16) Muhlenberg Central, (17) Bow- 
ling Green, (18) Russellville, (19) Park City, 
(20) Metcalfe County, (21) Tavlor County, 
(22) LaRue County, (23) Elizabethtown, 
(24) Bardstown, (25) Central, (26) Male, 
(27) Southern, (28) Trinitv, (29) Shep- 
herdsville, (30) Shelby County, (31) Oldham 
County, (32) Grant County, (33) Boone 
County, (34) Covington Catholic. (35) New- 
port Catholic, (36) Highlands, (37) Harri- 
son County, (38) Pendleton, (39) Maysville, 
(40) Paris, (41) Frankfort, (42) Mercer 
County, (43) University, (44) Madison Cen- 
tral, (45) Danville, (46) Memorial, (47) 
Somerset, (48) London, (49) Annville Insti- 
tute, (50) Rockhold, (51) Bell County, (52) 
Hall, (53) Letcher, (54) Hazard, (55) Knott 
County, (56) Owsley County, (57) Phelps, 
(58) Wayland, (59) Van Lear, (60) Sandy 
Hook, (61) DuBois, (62) Owingsville, (63) 
Olive Hill, (64) Ashland. 

1962 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State College, (2) Christian 
County High School, (3) Owensboro High 
School, (4) Meade County High School, (5) 
Bowling Green High School, (6) Taylor 
County High School, (7) Louisville, (8) 
Shelby County High School, (9) Boone Coun- 
ty High School, (10) Harrison County High 
School, (11) University High School, (12) 
Somerset High School, (13) Cumberland 
High School, (14) Hazard High School, (15) 
Prestonsburg High School, (16) Morehead 
State College. 



"Certified" Officials 

Since the list of "certified" officials appeared in 
the January issue of the magazine, two additional 
officials have qualified for this rating. They are Bill 
Overly and Curtis E. Peay. 

News About Swimming 

The 1962 State High School Swimming Meet for 
Class A will be held in Lexington on Friday evening 
and Saturday, Febi-uary 23-24, at the University of 
Kentucky pool. The meet for Class B will be held at 
the same location on Saturday, March 31. 

Class A will include those high schools with an 
enrollment of 750 or more (grades 9-12), and Class B 
will include those schools with an enrollment of less 
than 750. Any school may enter a class above its 
classification. 

Class A will have eleven events this year, Class B 
eight. Individual contestants may enter only two 
events, including Fancy Diving. 

The Class A events are as follows: 400 Yard Free- 
style, 50 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard Butterfly, 200 Yard 
Freestyle, 100 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard Breast- 
stroke, 100 Yard Freestyle, Fancy Diving, 200 Yard 
Individual Medley, 200 Yard Medley Relay, and 200 
Yard Freestyle Relay. 

The Class B events are: 50 Yard Freestyle, 100 
Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard Breaststroke, 100 Yard 
Freestyle, Fancy Diving, 200 Yard Individual Medley, 
200 Yard Medley Relay, and 200 Yard Freestyle Relay. 

Class B Diving will be arranged so that the con- 
testants have to perform no more than seven dives 
(providing they qualify for the finals). There will be 
four preliminai-y dives (No. 101, No. 201, No. 401, and 
No. 510, all required) in the morning session. The 
three remaining dives will be in the afternoon, all 
optional. 

Girls may enter the meet as members of their 
respective school teams in diving. It was hoped that 
an auxiliary meet for girls only in each class could 
be set up for 1962. However, a survey of Class A 
schools indicates that there is not enough interest 
this year for a girls' meet to be conducted in this Class. 
A similar survey will be conducted among Class B 
schools, and it is entirely possible that an auxiliary 
meet for girls will be conducted on March 31 at the 
time of the Class B meet for boys. 

The method of entering teams in the meet will be 
the same as in past years, with the State Office sup- 
plying entry blanks to the schools whose principals 
have indicated that they will enter teams in the meet. 
The Association will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and meals, 
as is given State Track Meet participants in each 
event. Expense for the swimming coach will be paid 
if the school has as many as four entries in the State 
Meet. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 
If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise desi^rnated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Babbage. Donald R., llOCO Grafton Hall, Valley Station, 
WE 7-5977 

Ball, Lonnie. Kenova. W. Va. 

Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., Route No. 1, Greenmound Rd., Ne^r 
Richmond, Ohio 

Clark, Owen B., 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetows, 2047, Lexing- 
ton 2-8717 

Caruso, Richard A.. 1150 Wellspring Drive, Cincinnati 31, 
Ohio, JA 1-3349, GA 1-3300 

Dawson, Alby, 2108 Eastway. Lexington, 7-9055 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



Page Three 



Fulkerson. James R.. 1120 Pearl St., Owensboro, MU 4-5458, 

MU 4-6636 
Hafele. Charles Hargis, 726 St. Louis Ave., Connelton, Indiana 
Jenkins, Claude J., 507 W. Stansifer Ave.. Clarksville, Indiana 
McDowell, Glen D., 504 6th Street. Pikeville, GE 7-4546 
Miller, Kenneth H., Sgt., 4469-B Gaffey Hts., Fort Kno.x 
Peay, Curtis E., Bowling Green, VI 3-8171 

Thompson, Thomas A., 3435 Greentree Road, Lexington, 6-8921 
Watts, Shirley, 802 Carneal Road. Lexington, 5-2743, 2-5494 
Whipple, Lloyd G., 216 South Frederick St., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-5809, HA 6-3137 
Withrow, Roy D., 424 Res. Ave,, Central City, 742-W, 9 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
Hig'h School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday 
morning, January 20, 1962. The meeting vi'as 
called to order by President W. H. Crowdus 
at 9:15, with Directors Jack Dawson, K. G. 
Gillaspie, Don R. Rawlings, Oran C. Teater, 
and Cecil A. Thornton ; Commissioner Theo 

A. Sanford, and Assistant Commissioner J. 

B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Oran 

C. Teater, that the reading of the minutes 
of the December 16th meeting be waived, 
since the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported on a recent 
football referendum which had been sent out 
by his office, in an effort to determine 
whether districts should be set up in the 
various regions of Classes A and AA. He 
stated that the principals in all regions ex- 
cept Region 3 of Class AA had voted for the 
district set-up not later than 1963, but that 
only Region 4 of Class A and Region 1 of 
Class AA had voted for districts in 1962. The 
Commissioner stated that Region 4 of Class 
AA had been districted for 1961, and that he 
recommended districting in Region 4 of Class 
A and Region 1 of Class AA for 1962, with 
all regions of Classes A and AA being dis- 
tricted for 1963 except Region 3 of Class A. 
K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the districting plan recom- 
mended by the Commissioner for 1962 and 
1963 be adopted and made a part of the foot- 
ball playoffs system. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Chairman K. G. Gillaspie of the Policy 
Committee reported that his Committee 
would recommend proposals to the Board of 
Control, to be submitted to the 1962 Delegate 
Assembly, providing for the reduction of the 
total number of basketball games played by 
K.H.S.A.A. teams during the regular season 
and limiting the number of games played on 
nights preceding school days. Mr. Gillaspie 
stated that the committee would submit its 
proposals to the Board at the next meeting. 



Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that the following regulation 
concerning fees for the regional tournament 
officials be adopted : The official shall re- 
ceive a fee of $20.00 per game and a trans- 
portation allowance of 8 cents per mile for 
all necessary travel. In the event that it is 
necessary for the official to remain over- 
night at the tournament site, he shall be paid 
an additional $10.00 per day for lodging and 
meals. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by K. 
G. Gillaspie, that the 1962 State Track Meet 
be held in Lexington on May 18-19, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to set the 
dates and determine the sites of the other 
spring events. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

There was a discussion of the plan to be 
used in the selection of State Basketball 
Tournament officials for 1962. Don R. Raw- 
lings moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the present rating plan in the selection 
of state tournament officials by the coaches 
of the participating teams be continued, but 
that the number of officials working in the 
tournament be increased to eight. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that there 
was a possibility of two or three ties in the 
district basketball tournament balloting. K. 
G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Cecil A. 
Thornton, that the Commissioner be given 
authority to break the ties and select the 
tournament site in each district involved. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by K. 
G. Gillaspie, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning December 16, 1961, 
and ending January 19, 1962, be approved. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



BIG EIGHT ALL-CONFERENCE TEAM 

Ends: Pollock, Madisonville; Peyton, Henderson 
County; Mason, Daviess Cour.ty; Carpenter, Owens- 
boro. 

Tackles: Ball, Henderson County; Taylor, Owens- 
boro High; Berry, Sturgis. 

Guards: Ashmore, Madisonville; Bell, Morganfield; 
Gish, Henderson County; Smith, Owensboro High. 

Centers: Apman, Owensboro; Bennett, Owensboro 
Catholic. 

Quarterbacks: Watkins, Owensboro; Thomason, 
Henderson County. 

Halfbacks: McMullin, Henderson County; Levitch, 
Owensboro; Wells, Madisonville; Woodring, Sturgis. 

Fullbacks: Gillham, Henderson County; Geiger, 
Morganfield. 



Page Pour 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

Norb Raque is one of the outstandiiig 
civic leaders of the Falls Cities area. He serv- 
ed Bellarmine College as its first basketball 
coach and has years of experience as an of- 
ficial. Norb is interested in sports because 
they are good for boys. He organizes "oodles" 
of kids teams as a volunteer service as a 
member of the Glendale Optimist Club — so 
Norb Raque was serious when he expressed 
concern to the Dutchman about the harm 
destructive criticism of basketball officials 
by a few sports writers and announcers is 
doing sports. Norb asked the Dutclbman to 
answer the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1 Do you think it is 
helpful to sports to have sports writers or 
announcers castigate officials? 

ANSWER: Castigation is harmful; con- 
structive criticism is helpful. If it is my job 
to criticize, then it also becomes my job to 
offer a solution to correct the situation I am 
critical of. 

QUESTION NO. 2 How many sports 
writers and announcers attend your basket- 
ball clinics annually to learn the rules well 
enough to qualify them as critics? 

ANSWER: Not more than one-half 
dozen in the entire State of Kentucky. All 
sports writers in Kentucky should be requir- 
ed to attend rules clinics by their editors. The 
same should be true of announcers. A few 
years ago Earl Ruby, Sports Editor for the 
Courier-Journal, called the Dutchman to his 
office to help him organize a special clinic 
for sports writers. This materialized and was 
held at the Brown Hotel in Louisville. It was, 
however, only done the one year and that was 
a number of years ago. It was a worthwhile 
project. 

QUESTION NO. 3 What is your Dutch 
philosophy about criticism? 

ANSWER : The trouble with most of us 
is that we would rather be ruined by praise 
than saved by criticism. 

Because partisan fans feel that officials 
are "meanies," there will always be a lot of 
gleeful readei's of articles "dressing down" 
the men with the whistles. By following the 
line of least resistance, writers and announc- 
ers can always insure themselves a lot of 
readers or listeners by "Getting on the of- 
ficials." We must be fair, though — It is 
wrong to "chew anybody out" if he is doing 
an unpopular job right. It is well for all of 
us to always keep in mind, however, that 
without officials there can be no sports. 



Al Gustafson, Jr., well known across Ken- 
tucky as an outstanding basketball official, 
has come up with an excellent idea for the 
advancement of the Dutchman's state-wide 
sportsmanship program. Al suggests that 
each major athletic season be launched with 
a "Sportsmanship Game," having as its 
prime aim emphasis on sportsmanship. If 
our principals would also arrange chapel pro- 
grams during the three (3) major sports 
seasons to teach students and adults proper 
manners at sports contests, Kentucky would 
be assured of remaining the "Sportsmanship 
Capitol of the Nation." Because of the unsel- 
fish service and the work which Al continual- 
ly gives to the promotion of cleaner sports, 
he is a recipient of the Flying Dutchman's 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award for the month 
of February. 

It is unusual to have two (2) Cob Pipe 
winners in the same month, but this second 
award has been delayed too long already and 
must be made now. Wherever travelers go in 
Kentucky, they find people singing the 
praises of Greensburg's Gene Tate. This 
gentleman is not only liked, but deeply re- 
vered in the places where he has spread his 
influence while teaching and coaching. He is 
the coach who developed the fabulous Frank 
Ramsey at Madisonville; and he is also the 
gentleman who has, by his exemplary life, 
led young people wholesomely and directed 
their leisure 'hours wisely. The little 
thoroughbred with the pipe adorning its neck 
is on its way to a great Kentuckian, Gene 
Tate of Greensburg. 

From Francele H. Armstrong, editor of 
the Henderson Gleaner and Journal, comes a 
letter saying, "I am delighted with the eques- 
trian figure and the Corn Cob Pipe which 
you sent to me last week. I am also very 
proud of the certificate indicating recogni- 
tion of my interest in park development in 
Kentucky. This is the first time I have heard 
of these awards and I am interested in learn- 
ing more of them so that I can do a story 
about them in my column." If any of you 
fellows around Henderson have this column, 
please send it on to the Dutchman. Such 
articles are gratifying. Gratification is good 
for the inner Dutch Man. 

Brooksville's Bracken County News fea- 
tured a picture and a front-page story of 
Marvin Hildenbrand, who won the Lionheart 
Award last month. The local newspapers a- 
cross the State are taking a great interest 
in the Game Guy Awards, the Abou Ben 
Adhem Awards, and the Com Cob Pipe of 
(Continued on Page Six) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



Paffe Five 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A- 
Member Schools — 1961 



SCHOOL 

Anderson 

Ashland 

Atherton , 

Attucks 

Austin Tracy 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

3erea 

Bishop David Memorial 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Bryan Station 

Buckhorn 

Burgin 



utle 



Caldwell County 

Camp Dick Robinson 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Carlisle 

CarroUton 

Catholic Country Day 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Clark County 

Christian County 

Corbin 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Cynthiana 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs Mem. 

Dixie Heights 

Douglass ( Henderson) 
Douglass (Murray) __. 

DuBois 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

Eastern 

East Main Street 

Elizabethtown 

Eikhorn City 

Eminence 

Evai-ts 

Fairdale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget . 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Hall 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 

High Street 



Hii 



■ille 



Holn 

Hopkinsville 

lenkins 

Jessamine County . 
Kentucky Mil. Inst. 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 







1 


OTHER SCHOOL 
















COACH 




OFFICIALS 






CROWD 






TEAM 


G 


F 


P 


I E G F 


p 


E 


G 


F 


P 


! E 


G F 


7 








29 


3 








26 


6 








30 


3 





4 








36 


3 








32 


7 








36 


3 





4 


2 


5 


34 


4 


4 





30 


8 


3 





29 


10 


2 


10 


1 





14 


7 








8 


13 








12 


9 





6 


3 





21 


3 


1 





13 


10 


2 





16 


6 




1 


1 





26 











24 


2 








24 


1 


1 


i <> 








27 


6 








26 


7 


1 





28 


6 





6 


3 


3 


6 


9 





1 


5 


6 


3 


2 


2 


3 


6 


4 


1 


1 


23 


1 








21 


3 








18 


6 





6 








31 


5 








30 


6 








30 


6 





4 


4 





33 


1 








24 


9 


1 





23 


9 


2 


12 


1 





33 


11 








33 


11 








31 


13 














17 











16 


1 








14 


3 





4 








7 


2 








7 


2 








4 


4 


1 


4 








30 


5 








28 


7 








27 


8 





3 








18 











18 











17 


1 





11 


2 





46 


4 





1 


44 


7 








39 


11 


1 


9 


1 





28 


7 








27 


7 


1 





?,1 


7 





8 








22 


3 








15 


6 


2 


2 


15 


6 


4 


1 








14 











14 











13 


1 





4 








34 


5 








34 


7 








35 


5 


1 


8 


1 


4 


38 


4 








38 


4 








32 


7 














10 











10 











10 








15 


1 


2 


28 


9 







25 


12 


1 





26 


11 




7 


2 


1 


30 


4 




1 


29 


6 


1 


1 


30 


6 





4 





1 


27 


6 







26 


7 








25 


8 





5 








18 


3 







18 


3 








17 


3 




2 


1 





23 


1 







22 


3 








21 


4 





9 





1 


34 


6 







32 


9 








28 


11 


2 


3 








26 


1 







24 


3 








26 


1 





24 


1 





11 


25 







9 


25 


2 





12 


20 


3 


7 








33 


4 







31 


5 


1 





31 


5 


1 


5 


1 





19 










17 


3 








17 


3 








2 


1 


32 


1 







29 


4 


1 





29 


8 




7 


1 





35 


5 







32 


7 


1 


1 


26 


13 


2 


3 








29 











24 


4 


1 





28 


6 




4 


3 


1 


24 


4 








24 


4 








21 


5 




5 


2 





33 


7 








33 


7 








32 


8 




11 








27 


11 








28 


11 








23 


15 




9 





1 


32 


8 








32 


8 








81 


9 





5 


3 





33 


4 


2 





33 


5 





1 


32 


7 





7 


1 


4 


24 


8 


1 





20 


8 


3 




21 






8 








25 


8 








21 


12 








22 


10 




9 


2 





16 


8 








11 


12 


1 





8 


11 




3 








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Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



SCHOOL 
Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) .._ 

Lincoln (Padueahl 

Lincoln Institute 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madison 

Madisonville 

Male 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesborougrh 

Millersburg Mili. Inst. 

Morgan County 

Morj^anfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Oldham County 

Old Ky. Home 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic ___ 
Paducah Tilghman ___ 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Park City l_ 

Paris 

Perryville 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

P. L. Dunbar 

Pleasure Ridge Park _ 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rosenwald (Harlan) _ 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph (Bardstown) 

St. Xavier 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somei-set 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill 

Fompkinsville 

Trigg County 

Trinity 

Valley 

Versailles 

Waegener 

Wallins 

Warren County 

Western (Owensboro) _ 

Western (Paris) 

West Main 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wurtland 



FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Pag-e Four) 

Honor Awards. This all adds up to a better 
athletic program for Kentucky. Incidentally, 
Fred B. Wachs who won a Com Cob Pipe 
Award during 1961, was recently accorded 
one of Kentucky's highest honors when he 
was declared the most valuable member of 
the Kentucky Press Association. The Dutch- 
man salutes the Lexington Herald-Leader's 
Man of Service, Fred B. Wachs. 



2 


1 


5 























2 





2 


1 





1 








1 






}?1 



3 I 1 

James A. Pursifull, personable principal 
of Bell County High School deep in the 
mountains of Kentucky, must be rated one 
of Kentucky's outstanding leaders in the 
field of recreation as well as one of its lead- 
ing educators. Realizing that all children 
need to develop socially and that often his 
mountain students did not have enough oj)- 
portunities to "re-create" themselves, Jim 
designed a unique, daily, social period which 
is attracting wide acclaim. This lengthens 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



Page Seven 



the school day an hour for both teachers and 
pupils — ^but it pays dividends, by eliminating 
youthful frustrations. Jim Pursifull is a 
great guy. 

The Dutchman's closing thought is: Give 
that job to be done to a busy man — He'll 
have his secretary do it. 



Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officals 

The following rating's were received on football 
officials registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1961- 
1962. The numbers following each name represent 
respectively the number of Fxcellent, Good, Fair, and 
Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abele, George F., 21-6-1-0; Adkins, Wendell L., 
1-0-0-0; Allen, Charles E., 0-1-0-0; Almon, James H., 
0-4-0-0; Anderson, E. W., Jr., 3-5-0-2; Ashworth, Fred 
G., 1-0-1-0; Atkinson, Charlie, 6-6-2-1; Attick, William 
E., 2-8-1-3; 

Baker, Charles J., 11-6-0-0; Ballard, Robert A., 9- 
9-4-0; Barbour, Morris H., 1-1-0-0; Barlow, Bill B., 
5-5-1-4; Barlow, Bob, 4-6-2-0; Bartels, John, 2-3-2-0; 
Baskin. Sylvester, 0-2-0-0; Bauer, Richard E., 2-4-1-0; 
Beck, C. Norman, 5-7-1-1; Bell, Clarence T., 0-2-1-0; 
Bennett, Howard "Pete", 6-7-0-0; Blanton, Homer, 3- 
3-1-2; Blosser, Kermit, 1-0-0-0- ; Bocook, George Allen, 
1-1-0-0; Boeh, William, 1-5-0-0; Boeing, Charles F., 
5-2-0-0; Boemker, Bob. 1-9-0-1; Bond, Jack, 12-4-1-1; 
Book, Donald C, 4-5-1-0; Bordy, Philip, 1-0-0-0; Bos- 
tick, Lord M., Jr., 7-8-3-0; Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 
9-6-1-0; Boyle, Dennis M., 4-1-0-0; Boyles, Jerrv F., 
3-0-1-4; Brandenburg, Donald E., 17-9-2-1; Brichler, 
Joe A., 0-2-0-1; Briscoe, Edward D.. Jr., 9-11-2-0; 
Brizendine, Vic, 11-10-1-0; Brotzge, Maurice J., 6-16- 
0-0; Brown, George W., 9-8-0-1; Brown, John W., 6- 
5-2-0; Bunn, Gary, 2-1-1-0; Burke, Daniel F., 2-5-0-0; 
Burke, Harry R., 1-2-1-0; Burton, John, 3-2-0-4; Byrd, 
Harry G., 7-2-0-0; 

Cain, Paul D., 1-5-1-0; Caldwell, Charles M., 1-0-0- 
0; Caiman, E. C, Jr., 0-5-1-1; Campbell, John J., 8-4- 
1-0; Canter, John, 13-13-1-0; Carlson, David A., 10- 
7-0-0; Carroll, James L., 6-1-1-1; Carroll, Thomas J., 
5-11-0-0; Carswell, Ernest L., Rev., 13-1-1-0; Gathers, 
Bob, 8-11-0-0; Cathey, Gene S., 7-6-0-0; Cecil, A. 
Morris, 5-7-0-0; Chesher, Paul E., 0-1-0-0; Chinn, 
Ralph, 2-1-0-0; Clark, Bill W., 7-3-0-0; Clark, Owen 
B., 3-5-1-3; Clinard, Fred L., 4-2-1-0; Cluskv, Joe, 0- 
1-0-0; Coleman, L. J. "Duke", Jr., 11-4-2-1; Conn, 
Kenneth, 0-5-0-0; Corea, Frank, 7-1-0-0; Coulter, Wil- 
liam, 1-0-0-0; Cowan, Robert L., 5-12-1-1; Cox, Wil- 
liam J., 1-8-2-0; Craft, Albert B., 2-5-1-1; Craft, Bill, 
5-14-1-2; Crager, Bobby F., 1-0-1-1; Creasy, Fred, 8- 
6-0-0; Crouch, Jack J., 1-0-0-0; Crum, Edward E., 4- 
8-0-1; Cubbin, George C, 2-0-1-0; Gulp, Willard E., 
8-6-2-0; Curnutte, James R., 3-0-0-0; Current, Ellis 
Ray, 9-7-0-0; 

Dahlander, Ward M., 2-0-0-0; Dallmann, James W., 
2-5-0-1; Daniel, Ernest H., 5-2-0-0; Davidson, Norman 
L., 0-3-0-0; Davis, Charlie, 3-2-0-0; Davis, Clyde E., 
2-2-0-2;. Davis, Curtis, 0-0-0-1; Davis, Ralph C, 0-1-0- 
0; Davis, William P., 1-0-0-0; Deaton, Dan, 0-1-0-0; 
DeMuth, Paul E., 3-6-0-0; Denton, Charles, 4-7-1-0; 
Detenber, Gene, 3-10-0-0; Deutsch, T. C, Jr., 1-3-0-0; 
Dial, Charles R., 1-0-0-0; Dierolf, William H., Jr., 5- 
15-0-0; DiMuzio, Robert, 1-0-0-0; Dixie, C. P., 0-1-1-0; 
Dotson, W. S., 3-5-0-0; Downey, Robert F., 2-0-0-0; 
Drake, Richard R., 4-1-0-0; Duke, J. W., 10-10-1-0; 
Durkin, Jack H., 38-4-0-0; 



Edelen, Ben R., 15-14-2-0; Elliott, Carroll L., 4-2- 
3-1; Ellis, Harry, 7-6-4-1; EUspermann, George A., 
4-1-0-0; Elovitz," Carl, 9-7-0-4; Ensslin, Thomas F., 
9-5-1-0; 

Fallon, Robert, 1-6-1-0; Falls, William M., Sr., 1- 
4-0-0; Fandrich, William, 2-2-1-2; Farley, Ken, 7-6-0- 
0; Faust, Jack, 6-14-0-3; Feix, Darl W., 6-2-0-0; Fergu. 
son, Thomas L., 1-0-0-0; Fey, Allen, 0-1-0-0; Fletch- 
er, John L., 11-3-2-1; Florence, Robert H., 9-8-0-0; 
Forbes, J. W., Jr., 3-10-3-3; Fortney, Robert Lee, 
14-8-2-0; Foster, Berryman E., 5-6-2-1; Foster, J. W., 
5-11-0-1; Fraley, Bill, 2-7-2-1; Franklin, James A., 
0-1-0-0; Freese, Ollie, 2-5-0-0; Fruit, William 1-1-0-0; 
Fryrear, Bill P., 3-4-0-0; Fugate, E. Hugh, 1-1-1-1; 
Funkhouser, Roy A., 12-2-0-0; 

Gammon, William H., 9-2-0-0; Gettler, John F., 
7-6-1-1; Gibson, Fred W., 7-5-0-2; Gillespie, Robert C, 
1-0-1-1; Gluszek, Henry, 9-1-5-1; Golden, Billy Joe, 
15-4-5-2; Gour, Robert A., 5-1-0-0; Gourley, Harold E., 
0-3-0-0; Grace, Charles K., 7-5-3-1; Grace, H. E., Jr.. 
3-2-2-0; Graham, James, 2-6-7-0; Greene, Paul 
"Dutch" 4-4-1-0; Griggs, John M., 10-5-2-1; Gruneisen, 
Sam J., 7-5-0-0; 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 35-10-0-0; Hagan, Joe 
"Red", 11-11-2-0; Hagerman, Bart, 2-2-1-5; Hagy, 
Harold J., 3-0-0-0; Hale, Don C, 10-1-0-0; Hall, John 
R., 0-2-1-0; Hanes, Edward C, 9-7-0-0; Harris, John 
C, 8-6-2-0; Harris, Russell, 8-11-0-0; Harrod, Robert, 
1-1-0-0; Hatfield, Gene S., 4-4-0-0; Hawkins, Robert 
W., 2-6-0-1; Heinold, F. Thomas, 4-2-0-0; Heinold, 
Jack, 2-4-0-0; Heinze, Frank, 21-4-1-1; Heinze, John 
G., 19-5-2-0; Hellard, George Dewey, Jr., 9-2-1-1; Hill, 
Earl F., 10-3-0-0; Hoferer, Louis R., 9-5-0-0; Hofstet- 
ter, Joe, 8-1-0-0; Holbrook, William, 5-4-0-0; Hole- 
man, D. Fletcher, 7-9-1-1; Holman, S. T. "Bitsy", 8- 
2-3-2; Howerton, Jack, Jr., 12-15-1-0; Huber, Carl W., 
3-1-0-0; Huber, Jerry, 1-3-1-0; Hughes, Robert E., 7- 
7-2-1; Hunter, Charles, 3-0-0-1; Hyland, John L., 2-7- 
0-1; Hynson, Fred R., 4-1-0-0; 

Idol, Billy Joe, 3-0-0-1; 

Jackson, Dennis M., 0-4-0-0; James, Gene, 2-0-0-0; 
Jarboe, Clem, 0-1-1-0; Jenkins, Kean, 7-3-3-1; John- 
son, Bernard M., 14-6-0-1; Johnson, Frank W., 0-2-0-0; 
Johnson, Harry A., Jr., 6-1-2-1; Johnson, Stanley W., 
Jr., 0-2-0-0; Jones, J. Carl, 2-1-0-0; Jones, Paul, 3-1-0- 
0; Jones, William A., 1-1-0-0; Josephs, Michael, 
1-0-0-0; 

Kathman, Bernie, 2-0-1-0; Kauffman, Victor C, 
4-3-1-0; Kemper, Russ, 6-4-0-0; Kerr, Kenneth, 9-4-0- 
0; Kessell, Harry R., 1-0-0-0; Kimble, Frank, 8-0-0-0; 
King, Allen, 6-7-2-2; Knight, James A., 0-0-0-2; 
Kraesig, Charles F., 2-9-0-0; Kyle, Leslie G., Jr., 3- 
13-1-0; 

Lally, James J., 1-0-0-0; Lamb, Billy J., 0-0-1-1 
Lambert, Ii-vin, 6-2-0-0; Lambert, Kenneth L., 0-2-0-1 
Lancaster, Morris B., 5-8-0-1; Lawson, Leland, 4-7-0-0 
Lee, Charles J., 1-2-0-0; Lenahan, Thomas F., 5-11-2-1 
Lewis, Horace N., 2-2-0-0; Lewis, Jesse O. D., 4-0-0-0 
Lewis. Richard Q., 0-16-0-0; Liber, James, 1-3-1-0: 
Longenecker, David M., 14-10-3-0; Lowe, Eugene T. 
6-5-5-1; Lowe, Stan, 9-10-2-0; Lucas, Gene T., IS-O-O^ 
1; Lucas, Thomas L., Jr., 1-2-0-0; 

McCollum, Robert G., 3-1-0-1; McClure, James B., 
1-1-0-0; McCowan, Connell, 15-8-0-0; McDade, C. F., 
1-0-1-0; McGehee, Gordon, ,3-2-0-0; McGlasson, Eu- 
gene M., 0-3-0-0; McHenrv, Louis P., 3-13-0-0; Mc- 
Kinney, Adelle F., 0-1-0-0; McMullan, Cecil E., 6-2-1-0; 
McQuilling, Gerald, 0-3-1-0; Makepeace, William H., 
3-4-0-0; Malcolmn, Don, 1-0-0-1; Malone, Donald R., 
4-0-0-0; Marks, Edward W., 9-2-1-0; Marsili, Lee A., 
0-1-0-0; Martin, Bill, 0-1-1-0; Matarazzo, S. M., 4-1- 
0-0; Mathis, Curtis W., 3-2-0-1; Maxwell, Ray, 1-0-0-0; 
May, E. B., Jr., 19-4-3-0; May, Robert M., 1-1-0-0; 
Mayhugh, Robert Lee, 10-2-4-1; Mayhew, William M., 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



fi-4-3-1; Mayo, Henry L., Jr., 8-1-0-2; Mesks, Jack F., 
12-S-O-O; Melmige, Jim, 2-0-0-0; Mercke, Frank R., 
7-9-2-0; Miller, Kenneth H., 10-7-0-0; Minton, Eugene 
H., 3-4-1-1; Mitchell, Emmett D., 8-11-1-0; Mitchell, 
Vvron W., 9-4-1-0; Moore, Pete, 1-3-4-0; Mordica, 
William, 4-2-3-1; Morris, Gene, 7-0-0-0; Morrisey, 
"Rockne", 5-3-0-0; Moss, Howard A., 8-3-0-0; Moss, 
James W., 7-8-2-0; Mouser, H. D., 3-7-0-1; Mudd, Ed., 
3-4-0-0; MuUins, B. E., 6-0-1-0; Muntan, Peter J., 5- 
11-3-0; Murray, Thomas, 3-4-1-0; 

Nau, Bill, 17-6-1-0; Neal, Gene, 17-11-0-0; Nichol- 
son, J. Ke.i, 0-1-0-0; Noble, Clarence A., 1-0-0-1; No- 
land. Douglas, 10-.5-2-1; Nord, Bertrand, J., 4-2-1-1; 
Nord, Ed, 15-13-0-0; Nord, Gilbert, 9-4-1-0; 

Okruch, Nicholas, 0-5-0-0; Omer, Billy W., 5-12-2- 
1; O'Nan, Norman, 2-4-0-0; O'Neal, Bud, 1-6-0-0; Os- 
borne. Kenneth, 0-1-0-0; Osborne, Ted, 9-7-0-1; Over- 
by, H. E., 13-1-1-1; Owens, Charles, 2-0-0-0; 

Palmer, Carl A., 1-2-0-0; Parker, Billy E., 11-4-1- 
0; Parkhurst, David S., 6-1-2-1; Parsley, Clyde E., 7- 
6-0-1; Pate, Lloyd W., 9-1-1-0; Peeno, Harry R., 2-4- 
0-0; Perry, A. L., 0-1-0-0; Phelps, Don "Dopey", 4-1- 
0-1; Pinson, Eugene, 0-4-2-0; Piper, James K., 1-2-0-0; 
Poore, William E. "Tunney", 7-2-1-0; Powell, Logan, 
11-3-5-1; Powers, Thomas J., 2-1-0-0; Prior, Lowell F., 
0-1-0-0; 

Raisor, J. T., 7-5-2-2; Raitt, William C, 0-3-0-0; 
Rapp, Bill, 2-0-0-0; Rapp, Lowell, 1-0-0-0; Ray, Shir- 
ley G., 3-12-0-1; Reddington, James T., 1-9-1-0; 
Reece, Fred, 12-9-1-0; Reed, Gordon "Moe", 2-11-0-0; 
Renfro, John E., 4-1-1-1; Rentz, Thomas W., 9-9-0-0; 
Reinhart, Gene, 0-5-0-0; Rhatigan, Alfred J., 3-3-0-1; 
Rieman, Bob, 1-5-0-0; Riggs, William T., 7-6-0-0; 
Riggins. Jason, 7-1-0-0; Rivlin, Jule, 1-0-0-0; Robin- 
son, Don, 1-0-0-0; Roettger, W. H., 6-2-4-0; Rolph, 
Harold J., 2-2-0-0; Rudolph, Fred Jr., 9-18-1-0; Russell, 
C. B., Jr., 11-7-5-2; Russell, Gary E., 2-4-0-0; Russell, 
Joe, 14-7-2-1; 

Sacra, Gresham, 8-9-1-0; St. Clair, James, 0-1-0-1; 
Sanders, Mel, 7-3-4-0; Sapp, Edward, 5-1-0-0; Sauter, 
Harold S., 11-7-1-0; Saylor, Ben H., 7-0-0-0; Saylor, 
Deward, 0-2-0-1; Saylor, Emanuel, 4-3-0-2; Scharfen- 
berger, Irv, 2-4-0-0; Schellhase, Dave, 2-1-0-0; Schier- 
ing. Jack H.. 1-0-0-0; Schlich. Paul E., 5-6-0-0; Sch- 
mitt, K. F., 12-4-0-0; Schmitt, Paul E., 0-1-0-0; 
Schultz, John J., Jr.. 2-2-2-0; Schwetschenau. Paul J., 
0-4-0-0; Scott, W. L., 10-8-0-0; Seale, Frank E., 8-5-2- 
1; Seale, William E., 3-7-1-3; Sellier, Edward F., Jr., 
6-1-1-0; Sellman, John B., 1-0-1-0; Selvy, Curt, 12-11- 
1-1; Shanks, Thomas E., 2-0-0-0; Shaw, John H., 5-7- 
0-0; Shaw, Stanley E., 6-5-0-0; Sheets, William, 1-0-0- 
0; Sherman, Jerry, 1-0-0-0; Shewmaker, Wayne, 3-3- 
0-0; Showalter, John, 12-8-0-1; Shumate, Roy V., 7-3- 
0-1; Sinclair, George H., 2-4-4-4; Sizemore, Dewey, 
2-0-0-0; Skinner, Earnest, 0-1-0-0; Sloan, Earl D., 5- 
1-0-1; Sloan, Wallace, 6-16-2-0; Smith, Edgar James, 
12-21-5-0; Smith, Richard T., 1-1-0-0; Smith, Thomas 
E., 0-2-0-0; Smith, Walter K., 5-6-1-0; Snyder, Gus, 
0-1-0-3; Sper.cer, Edward H., 4-0-0-0; Staten, Joseph 
B., 2-0-0-0; Steele, Charles, 1-2-0-0; Stephenson, 
Harry S., 13-3-0-0; Stevens, Alex, 1-1-1-0; Stevens, 
William D., 9-7-1-1; Stewart, Herbert T., 3-9-1-0; 
Stone, Clifton, 2-2-1-1; Straight, Roy, 1-0-0-0; Strain, 
Richard P., 4-2-2-0; Strimer, Albert, 1-0-0-0; Strong, 
Arnett, 8-8-2-0; Stump, Bennett, 1-0-0-0; Sturgill, 
Barklev, 4-1-1-0; Sullivan, Don C, 17-7-5-1; Swinford, 
John M., 3-7-1-0; 

Tackett, Jay, 4-9-1-0; Taylor, D. C, 5-5-0-0; Tay- 
lor, Dennis H., 6-8-0-1; Thomas, Charles, 6-1-0-0; 
Thomas, Frank M., 1-2-0-0; Thomas, Raymond E., 2- 
0-0-1; Thompson, Jack, 25-22-0-0; Thompson, Jack, Jr., 
15-7-1-0; Thurman, J. W., "Spider", 22-2-0-1; Tim- 
mering, George E., 2-2-1-0; Tirey, James H., Lt. Col., 
2-1-1-0; Trautwein, J. R. 4-7-1-0; Treas, Joe W., 4-2- 



0-0; Troutman, Bill, 3-0-1-0; Trurzo, Nick, 1-5-0-2; 

Van Gilder, W. S., 0-1-0-0; VanMeter, David G., 1- 
8-2-0; VanHoose, Jack D., 6-0-1-1; Vankirk, Alvia S., 
6-3-2-1; Vennari, Paul, 2-1-0-0; Vennell, Robert, 
.5-0-0-0; 

Waide, Harry D., 2-8-0-2; Walker, Paul R., 14-8- 
3-1; Wanchic, Nicholas, 18-6-2-1; Watson, Ronald L., 
0-2-0-0; Watts, Shirley, 6-10-0-2; Weaver, Ray, 3-4-1- 
0; Weber, Davis, 0-4-0-0; Weisbrodt, Paul E., 11-4-2-0; 
Welch, Bill, 4-3-0-0; Welch, J. D., 0-6-1-0; Welch, Tom, 
2-5-0-0; Werkowitz, Jack, 0-1-0-0; Whittemore, Paul, 
1-1-1-0; Wiggington, Al. Sr., 4-6-2-0; Williams, Bert 
O., 2-3-0-0; Williams, Jim, 4-2-3-0; Willis, Donald A., 
1-1-1-0; Wilson, John Pope, 2-1-0-1; William, Roy E., 
7-1-2-0; Winfrey, Shelby, 9-2-0-0; Wise, Billy V., 10- 
8-1-2; Wise, Jack, 1.3-8-i-l; Womack, William H., 6-9- 
1-1; Wurtz, Emil, 0-2-0-0; Wyatt, William J., 1-0-0-0; 

Zimmer, Tom, 3-6-0-0. 



H. S. Athletics VS. Drop-Outs 

By Paul K. Teague 

E.\tension Speciali.st in Youth Development 

University of Kentucky 

The score is tied, two minutes remaining in the 
game urtil the final buzzer sounds. The packed gym 
is wild with excitement; every person is playing the 
game with every ounce of energy he can muster; the 
eager eyes of the referees are looking for infractions 
of the rules. What a game! Nobody leaves the gym 
until after the final buzzer sounds. There are no 
drop-outs from a game such as this. 

It is too bad that youngsters don't have the same 
eagerness to stay in school until the sounding of the 
last buzzer. We see far too many leaving the game at 
the end of the first quarter and at half time. Yes. the 
drop-out rate is high, far too high, at the end of the 
ninth and tenth grades. 

At your next big game take a look at the bleachers. 
How many of those youngsters will complete high 
school? It is safe to say that more than fifty per 
cent of them will fail to get their diploma. Do we tell 
them often enough and vividly enough that education 
is important? Every boy or girl who boosts your 
team has a lot of respect both for you as their coach 
and for your team. Would they listen to you? Your 
team does; so will your backers. 

A few things you could consider that would add 
greatly to a stay-in-school campaign are: 1.) Place 
a banner in the gym urging your boosters to stay in 
school and get that diploma, 2.) make annou.-.cements 
during half-time and between games, urging pupils 
to stay in school and get that diploma, 3.) include a 
stay-in-school slogan when you prepare your posters 
and programs for the forth-coming tournaments, 4.) 
plan a half-time demonstration by the pep club or 
cheerleaders on the importance of getting that 
diploma. 

Start your imagination to work and you'll come 
through with ideas that will cause youngsters to take 
a serious look at themselves and the importance of 
completing high school. It will be a very worthwhile 
project for you to push. This season will be a good 
time to start. 

As principal you know the thrill of learning. Can 
you discover how to pass this thrill on to the young- 
sters? If the same excitement and enthusiasm of the 
hardwood were prevalent in the classrooms, would 
we have as many drop-outs? 

As professional people you know what lies ahead 
for the drop-out. Many a youngster is a bench warmer 
in the game of life because he doesn't have his high 
school diploma. Many a youngster will not even have 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



Page Nine 



the opportunity to dress for the g'reat game of op- 
portunity on that job he has been dreaming about, 
because he quit school prematurely. 

Why is this addressed to you? A challenge faces 
you even greater than that victory over the opponent 
on the hardwood. If principals and coaches would con- 
sider playing key positions in a stay-in-school cam- 
paign, we might well see more youngsters in caps and 
gowns, completing the last half, and receiving that 
much-needed diploma. 

You have demonstrated in the past how the K. H. 
S. A. A. can push projects. You did a bang-up job 
pushing the safe-driving campaign a few years back. 
The high drop-out rate certainly has a devastating 
affect upon our communities, our state, and our na- 
tion. If our nation, our state, and our communities 
are to achieve the greatness they strive for, our 
youth must develop through education. This can only 
be done if they stay in school. 



More Aid From KSMA 

The Kentucky State Medical Association's 
Committee on School Health, by working 
with the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association, is attempting to expand and 
make more effective the care of the student 
in the school athletic programs. 

Many physicians have been active in Ken- 
tucky in the Medical Aspects of Sports. To 
increase this activity, however, the KSMA 
School Health Committee is contacting 
physicians in the state who have not been 
active in the past in order to attempt to im- 
prove medical coverage of the athlete and 
students generally. 

"Some physicians in the past have been 
reluctant to volunteer their services because 
of the fear that such services might not be 
wanted by the schools," R. E. Davis, M.D., 
Central City, chairman of the KSMA Com- 
mittee on School Health, said. 

"Some principals and coaches at the high 
school level have similarly been hesitant a- 
bout contacting busy physicians in their 
areas for fear that they, too, might receive 
either a rejection, or at best a lukewarm re- 
ception," Doctor Davis added. 

It is the feeling of the KSMA School 
Health Committee, Doctor Davis said, "that 
an attempt should be made to break this 
barrier in order that we may work together 
toward the common goal of healthy and 
strong students participating in athletics 
with a minimum of liklihood toward injury." 
_ In 1961, the KSMA School Health' Com- 
mittee, in cooperation with the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association, sponsored 
two athletic injury prevention conferences. 

Tentative plans are under way now by the 
KSMA and the KHSAA to hold several re- 
gional athletic injury prevention conferences 
throughout the state this year. 



The purpose of these conferences is to 
help keep physicians and coaches informed 
on the latest developments in the prevention 
of athletic injuries, and the general care and 
protection of our developing athletes. 

The KSMA School Health Committee 
would appreciate any suggestions as to how 
we can reduce athletic injuries. "We, too, be- 
lieve that Kentucky's greatest resource is a 
strong and healthy younger generation," 
Doctor Davis said. 



BIG EIGHT CONFERENCE STANDINGS 



Henderson County 
Madisonville 
Owensboro 
Daviess County 
Owensboro Catholic 
Sturgis 
Henderson 
Morganfield 
Crittenden County 



w 


L 


T 


7 


1 





6 


1 





6 


1 





3 


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3 


4 





3 


4 





1 


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1 


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7 






NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
improve mouth protectors as well as permit coaches 
and dental societies an opportunity to work on the 
evaluation of the various protectors available. 

Mr. J. W. Kellv addressed the group as represen- 
tative of the National Sporting Goods IManvifactur- 
ers' Association. He assured the Committee that the 
manufacturers would continue to work with and for 
the best interest of interscholastic football. Some of 
the suggestions submitted for the improvement of 
equipment have been already incorporated and will 
be available in the 1962 lines. He indicated that 
manufacturers were most appreciative of the en- 
couragement and help they were receiving from the 
medical associations and he acknowledged sincere 
appreciation to all groups who were making positive 
contributions to a safer game of football. 

Standing Sub-Committee Chairmen submitted valu- 
able reports which included information and material 
upon which the Rules Committee could base action. 
These reports were made by Kermit Anderson of the 
Safet.v Committee, who called upon John E. Roberts 
to present the results of an injury survey, J. C. Har- 
per of the Game Administration Committee, Lyle 
Quinn of the Equipment Committee, S. D. Jackson of 
the Research Committee and Webb Porter of the Sta- 
tistical Committee. W. M. Runyon presented the Na- 
tional Federation's official report of fatalities re- 
sulting from 1961 interscholastic competition. A sum- 
mary of these reports will be included in the com- 
plete minutes. 

Several carryover pi'oblems and new studies were 
referred to the Standing Committees for further 
study and recommendations. 

CHECK-UP ON 1961 CODE: Approximately 20,000 
National Alliance Football Questionnaires wei'e dis- 
tributed by the National Federation, the National 
Junior College Athletic Association and the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Nearly 8,000 
were returned and tabulated. The proportionate vote 
of one group differed very little from the correspond- 
ing vote in each of the other groups in all but two 
items. This prevailed for the check-up on last season's 
rules, as well as for possible revisions for the 1962 



Pass Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



QUESTIONNAIRE RESULTS, which were receiv- 
ed from all sections of the country, indicated a high 
deg-i-ee of satisfaction with the changes which were 
authorized for the 1961 season. The revision prohibit- 
ing- the use of any lime or caustic material for mark- 
ing the field was endorsed by 7,380 and was found to 
be unsatisfactory by only 414. The requirement that 
each player wear a face protector was approved by 
7991 of those returning questionnaires. The 1961 re- 
vision which permitted a fair catch to be made only 
beyond the line and between the goal lines was sup- 
ported by a vote of 28 to 1. A check-up revealed that 
only 4'''( were dissatisfied with the expansion which 
permitted a valid fair catch signal to be made by ex- 
tending and either waving or holding one hand only 
at full arm's length above the head. An oveinvhelming 
majority (7,218) favored the change which requires 
receivers to put the ball in play at the inbounds spot 
if R is the last to touch a free-kick which goes out-of- 
bounds between the goal lines. The check-up also en- 
dorsed, by 15 to 1, the provision that the right of R 
to take the ball at the spot of first touching by K be 
nullified if the penalty is accepted for any foul com- 
mitted during the down. 

Part II of the Questionnaire, which is based upon 
observation, revealed that SS'/f considered grasping 
the face mask of an opponent a major problem. 2,297 
indicated that, in their opinion, the face mask was 
contributing to the injury of the wearer. This phase 
of the Questionnaire is based entirely upon observa- 
tion, there were no statistics or supporting evidence 
presented to confirm the opinions. A substantial num- 
ber of reportees called attention to the use of hands 
during offensive blocking and suggested stricter en- 
forcement and increased attention from officials. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1962: Questionnaire 
returns evidence an evenly divided opinion regarding 
the advisability of specifying in a given year that all 
hard material in rib, shoulder and hip pads be covered 
with soft material. 4,189 favored the proposal, with 
.3,455 opposing it. Only lout of 3 favored the elimina- 
tion of return-kicks. 55'/f of the Questionnaires re- 
turned manifest satisfaction with present code cov- 
erage which provides that any kick becomes dead in 
a receiver's end zone when it touches something or is 
touched. A study of the returns from the college in- 
dicated that 25'/r of those reporting also supported 
the present coverage. An overwhelming majority of 
the total returned Questionnaires (6,537) favored the 
retention of the present rule which provides that a 
successful try-for-point scores one point. 5 out of 7 
returns recommended a provision which would permit 
the snapping- team to snap anywhere between the in- 
bounds marks on the proper yardline after a foul 
during- a down which follows a touchback. A majority 
of 62% favored a revision which would permit all 
player's on offense and defense to have identical 
rights as far as use of hands and arms is concerned 
after a forward pass which has crossed the line is 
touched by a team B player. The Questionnaires re- 
vealed that a majority of 66'/f presently reject the 
suggestion that a tee which would elevate the lowest 
part of the ball not more than two inches above the 
ground be legal for place-kicking purposes. The re- 
sponse of the colleges demonstrated considerable sup- 
port for this proposal. 48% of those returning Ques- 
tionnaires favored it. Several items were included in 
the Questionnaire for the purposes of securing in- 
formation based on the experience of those who wore 
tooth and mouth protectors and also, to learn what 
type and kind of mouth protector those replying pre- 
ferred. The reports indicated that half the squads 
had used tooth and mouth protectors. Approximately 



36% of the protectors used by those making the re- 
port were fabricated by a dentist. 41% were of the 
stock variety (intra-oral)with filling. 17% were of 
the stock variety (intra-oral) with no filling and 
slightly less than 6V1 were of the stock variety (extra- 
oral) which covers the outside of the mouth as well 
as keeping the arches apart. The report gave evi- 
dence that there were approximately 4 times as many 
dental injuries to players who were not wearing a 
mouth protector as there were to players who were 
wearing mouth protectors. 65% of those in this sur- 
vey favored a rule making it mandatory for all play- 
ers to wear a tooth protector. A majority of those 
favoring the requirement preferred that the player 
be permitted to weai- a tooth and mouth protector of 
his choice. 

The simplification and orderly arrangement of the 
rules, as in the National Alliance Code, are, on the 
basis of the Questionnaire report, becoming more 
widely understood, appreciated and accepted with 
each passing season. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

1-5-1: The article will include the requirement 
that "each player shall wear an intra-oral mouth and 
tooth protector which includes both an occlusal and a 
labial portion." It will recommend that the protector 
be fitted to the individual by impressing his teeth 
into the protector itself or that it be constructed from 
a model made from an impression of the individual's 
teeth. 

2-8-3: The Editor was directed to correlate the 
definition of batting with Case Book Comment 105A. 

3-3: The revision will provide that any accepted 
penalty for a foul by the offense during a down in 
which the first or third period expires shall be measur- 
ed before the change of goals. 

3-4-2 and 3: An addition to each of these items 
will specify that if the time required for the repair of 
faulty player equipment without assistance from a 
team attendant necessitates more than 25 seconds, a 
time-out will be charged his team if such is available 
and if a time-out is not available, the player must be 
replaced for at least one down. 

9-1-1: The article will be expanded to provide 
that a blocker may not snap or whip his forearm or 
elbow so that it is moving faster than the blocker's 
body at the time he makes contact with an opponent. 
Neither will the blocker be permitted to contact, with 
his hand or arm, an opponent above the opponent's 
shoulder. 

9-1-3: So that the possibility of injury may be 
reduced, the rule will prohibit a player from locking 
his hands. In addition, when a hand and arm are used, 
the hand must be in advance of the elbow at the time 
of contact. 

9-2: An additional clause to (b) will permit all 
players to have identical rights as far as the use of 
hand and arm is concerned after a forward pass which 
has crossed the line is touched by a player. 

Summaries of Penalties: Encroachment will be 
added for explanatory purposes to item 3, Loss of 5 
Yards. An addition to item 5, Loss of 15 Yards, will 
specify that "the down counts." 

GENERAL 

Additional details of supplementary action will 
be included in the complete, minutes which will follow 
at a later date. 

1. It was voted to include the following items in 
the 1963 Questionnaire: 

(a) Do you favor the elimination of the use of 
metal cleats ? 

(b) If a team has been privileged to put the ball 
in play anywhere between the inbounds marks on the 
pi'oper yardline and a foul occurs before or during 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



Page Eleven 



the down, do you favor extending the same privilege 
for the first dovifn following the measurement of the 
foul? 

(c) Shall it be legal to tackle above the shoulders? 

(d) Shall it be illegal to b'ock above the shoulders? 

(e) Should the penalty for grasping a face pro- 
tector be 15 yards and disqualification? 

(f) When the player "under the snapper" has 
extended his hands in position to receive the snap, 
shall he be denied the privilege of moving to a new 
position or being "in motion"? 

(g) Should all blocking from the rear be prohibit- 
ed? 

(h) Do you favor permitting the coach to confer 
with his entire team on the field during time-outs? 

(i) Do you prefer the present width goals (18 
feet 6 inches) or the wider goals (23 feet 4 inches) ? 

(j) Should the official dimensions of the field for 
8-Man Football be identical with those of 11-Man 
Football? 

2. The Editorial Committee was directed to revise 
Fundamental 13 to conform with the Rule and Case 
Book coverage. 

3. The Game Administration Committee was au- 
thorized to edit the Football Official's Manual and 
include the changes necessary to correlate the oubli- 
cation with the rules changes and points of officiat- 
ing emphasis adopted by the Football Rules Commit- 
tee. It also was assigned a study of Play Situation 207, 
Interpretations to be Checked, and Case Book Play 
247. The Committee was requested to study the situa- 
tions and applicable rules coverage. 

4. The Editor was directed to include in the ap- 
propriate publications, articles which: 

(a) direct officials to penalize promptly, and 
without previous warning, all infractions of grasping, 
holding or twisting an opponent's face protector. 

(b) instruct officials to enforce, without excep- 
tion, the rule which requires a 3-minute warm-up per- 
iod before the beginning of each half. 

(c) explain thoroughly and with emphasis the 
privileges and restrictions regarding the use of hand 
and arm. 

(d) instruct officials to penalize promptly and 
vigilently a player who piles on any player who is 
lying on the ground. 

5. The Committee Secretary was authorized to 
permit controlled experimentation with a tee which 
elevates the lowest point of the ball 2 inches above 
the ground. 

6. The Editorial Committee was directed to study 
the possibility of including in the definition of possess- 
ion, coverage for situations which are not specifically 
included. These are situations in which the player 
jumps high in the air to catch a muffed punt or a 
backward pass or a fumble and then comes dovm to 
the ground with a foot on or outside a sideline. 

7. Play Situation 206, Interpretations to be Check- 
ed, was approved by Committee action. 

8. The interpretation that any official has the 
authority to call time-out was approved by common 
consent. 



FILMS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

in the tournament are shown in the film. Also included 
are the first innings of the semi-final games and four 
innings of the final game between Nevirport Catholic 
and Murray. 

1957 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, color, $.75 
duPont Manual defeated Owensboro High for the 
championship by a score of 8-3. All of the final game 
is shown in color. 

Pitching Stars of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. 
Types of pitches and methods for practice are por- 
trayed. 

Play Ball, Son, j-s-, 1^/2 reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showdng a group 
of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in baseball. 
Correct methods of hitting, catching, and throwing 
are demonstrated in natural and slow motion. Based 
on book by Bert V. Dunne. 

Throwing in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing 
in baseball. Instructions are given for the over-head, 
three-quarter side, side, and underhand throws. Co- 
ordination of foot and arm motion is stressed, as well 
as coordination of the body as a whole. 

Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League stars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding and knowledge of the 
national pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan 
and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame ceremon- 
ies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from night 
baseball games. 

The Umpire In Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the 
baseball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing where they 
receive their training. 

World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

Highlights of the game between the Cleveland 
Indians and the New York Giants are shown in this 
film. The Giants, sparked by the sensaticmal hitting 
of Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight games. 
The Indians had set a record for the number of games 
won in winning the American League Pennant. 
World Series of 1955, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

Exciting moments of the seven games between the 
Brooklyn Lodgers and the New York Yankees are 
shown in this film. The commentary leading up to each 
game makes the film interesting as the Dodgers win 
the world championship. 

World Series of 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

The American League champion New York Yank- 
ees, carry the series the full seven games before bow- 
ing to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the Na- 
tional League. The film catches most of the hitting 
and shows the plays in which runs were scored in each 
game. The narrator. Lew Fonseea, describes the play 
and fills in the background with interesting bits of 
information concerning the game. 

World Series of 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

The highlights of the six games played in the 
Cleveland .ndians are shown in this film. Most of the 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1962 



WATCH FOR THE 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR 

1962-63 COVERAGES 



KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^4e Kl4ij(fden Qo^nficimf. 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the 
scoring plays are filmed, along with many of the 
outstanding defensive plays. The color that goes with 
these games is captured in the film. 
World Series of 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 Min.), 
color, $.75 
New York Yankees of the American League 
carried the series its full seven games before bowing 
to the National League Pittsburg Bucs. Highlights of 
all seven games are shown and the action described. 

Tennis 

Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil, Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 
Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Riggs is shown winning national tennis 
championship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis 
school in Chicago, he demonstrates how to make var- 
ious shots correctly — the grip, service, forehand drive, 
backhand, etc., using regular speed and slow motion. 

Golf 

Saving Strokes with Sam Snead, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his 
stance, his swing on each of several types of golf 
situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help to 
clarify the instruction. Shots with driver, brassie, and 
various irons for difficult lies are illustrated and 
finally his putting technique is shovim. 



ADVICE TO OFFICIALS 

1. Know the Rules. 

2. Control the game and keep unquestion- 
ed discipline without provoking resentment 
and antagonism. 

3. Always be courteous and calm. 

4. Dress like an official and look and act 
the part. 

5. Do not hesitate, make instant decisions 
without delay. 

6. Do not criticize other officials, players 
or coaches. 

7. Do not mingle with crowds before, 
during or after games. 

8. Never argue. 

9. Be dignified, do not sit or lean on 
scorers' table. 

10. Under no circumstances should an 
official ever lose his temper to coaches, 
players, or spectators. 

11. Be careful to call the game consistently 
from the first toss to the final gun. 

12. Keep the game moving on free throws, 
out-of-bounds or substitutions. Give your 
best in every game. Each team and game is 
entitled to the official's best. 

— Alabama H.S.A.A. 



WHILE YOU ARE IN LOUIVILLE 

FOR THE 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

VISIT 

SUTCLIFFE'S 

ATHLETIC DISPLAY 

ROOM 826 
WATTERSON HOTEL 

Your Traveling School Representative 
Will Be There To Greet You 



f^ ,. .THE 



UTCLIFFE 



COMPANY 
INC. 

225 South Fourth Street 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL STATE 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

March 14 thru March 17, 1962 

While in Louisville for the State Basketball Tourna- 
ment make our room at the Kentucky Hotel your head- 
quarters, for it is the meeting place for players, coaches 
and basketball fans. Our factory representatives, to- 
gether with our school representatives, Roy J. Boyd, 
Jim Mitchell and C. A. Byrn, Jr. will be on hand to 
make your visit in our room a pleasant one. 

We will have on display our new 1962 Spring and 
Summer samples as well as an advance showing on foot- 
ball and basketball supplies for the coming 1962 season. 
We would recommend that you be ready to place your 
order so that there will be no delay from the standpoint 
of delivery. 

Our Spring and Summer catalog was mailed to you a 
few weeks ago. If you failed to receive your copy, write 
us and we will gladly send you another. 

Remember-two of the basketballs to be used in the 
State Tournament can be secured from us. Namely, the 
Coach Adolph Rupp No. AFR official ball and the No. 
ARX official LastBilt basketball. Both of these balls 
carry the signature of Coach Adolph Rupp and used by 
the University of Kentucky Wildcats. Let us ship you 
these basketballs so that you will have the feel of the 
ball to be used in the State Tournament. 

For those last minute needs for tournament and for 
the last few games before tournament time let us assist 
you. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO„ INC. 

PHONE CHapel 7-1941 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




Hiqh School AthMe 

Site of the 1962 State Basketball Tournament 





TE~¥ 





Above is a view of the main entrance to the Exposition Center and Coliseum 
of the Kentucky State Fair plant in Jefferson County. Freedom Hall, the basketball 
arena, will be the site of the State High School Basketball Tournament this year. 
The approximate seating capacity is 17,000. 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 13B2 




Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night; 

For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 

And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV — NO. 8 



MARCH, 1962 



1.00 Per Year 



SPORTSMANSHIP — WHOSE RESPONSIBHJTY ? 



Editor's Note: This material was prepared originally by 
committees of experienced teachers in physical education at- 
tending the Ohio State University as graduate students. It 
appeared in four successive issues of The Ohio High School 
Athlete some fifteen years ago. The material has been revised 
recently by Delbert Oberteuffer. Donald Michielli and Joseph 
Carlson of Ohio State. It is printed in the ATHLETE through 
the courtesy of the Ohio High School Athletic Association. 
Sections of this report might be reprinted in school papers 
and made the subject of classroom discussion and student 
assembly programs. The material might also be useful for the 
public through radio and newspaper usage and as a basis of 
service club and community group discussion. 

Many responsible people are of the opinion that 
unless the quality of sportsmanship displayed at 
school and college games is improved, the contri- 
bution sport makes to the social development of 
young people will be sharply reduced. There is am- 
ple evidence to lead us to believe that behavior at 
both amateur and professional contests has reached 
a ne-w low. Arguments, fights, boos, lost tempers, 
inexcusable and unethical behavior are altogether 
too frequent. "Showboating" coaches are glorified 
in the press and made out to be defenders of their 
players and of the honor of their school. The lives 
of officials are made miserable by the protesting 
tactics ^ of coaches, players and spectators. Many 
complain that we seem to be losing our sense of 
proportion, our knowledge of how to behave. We 
seem to be degrading sport by making every game 
an unpleasant experience. 

What can be done? Nothing probably, unless 
we can unite on a program of acceptance of our 
respective responsibilities to clean things up. No 
one person can do it alone. Many must work for 
better sportsmanship and many would if each knew 
what to do. Responsibility can and must be fixed. 
Those involved at any level must see clearly his 
influence and behave accordingly. What are these 
responsibilities? 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE COACH 

The coach is the central figure in the sports- 
manship pattern of the school and community. He 
is the leader. In order for good sportsmanship to 
be the guiding principle in athletics for the team, 
student body, community, and press, he must know 
what good sportsmanship is and teach it to all. It 
has been said that as the coach goes, so goes the 
community. 
Specifically the coach should: 

1. At every opportunity urge the student body 
to be polite, courteous, and fair to the visiting team. 
Game assemblies, classes, informal meetings, and 
community gatherings should be used for this type 
of education. 

2. Always display good sportsmanship, losing 
or winning, so all observers can pattern their be- 
havior after his. 

3. Maintain poise and self-control at all times, 
especially at the games, never "showboat," never 
boo, never make a scene, never make a public dem- 
onstration of protest to officials or opposing per- 
sonnel. 

4. Teach his team to play fairly, not with "dirty" 



tactics. Games should be played hard without using 
unethical practice. 

5. Be a perfect host to the visiting team, coach, 
and crowd. Treat them as if they were guests in 
his own home. 

6. Select reputable officials for the games. 

7. Discipline and, if necessary, dismiss players 
who disregard good sportsmanship. 

8. Educate the players on the bench to the fact 
that it is unsportsmanlike conduct to yell intimidating 
remarks at the visiting team or officials. 

9. Have a good relationship with the press in 
order to promote the rig'ht interpretation of the game. 

10. Treat the officials like gentlemen, respecting 
their judgment and interpretation of the rules. 

11. Put his efforts on controlling his ovra team 
and let the officials control the game. 

12. Publicly shake hands with the officials and 
opposing coach before and after the game. 

The coach should not: 

1. Protest the decisions and actions of the offi- 
cials pertaining to the game during and after the 
contest, except in the privacy of the coaches' or offi- 
cials' quarters. 

2. Create bad feelings or misunderstandings 
through intimidating statements to players, the 
public, or to the press. A loose tongue is the root 
of most of the evil in misbehavior at games or 
matches. 

3. Reprimand a player in view of spectators or 
team members. 

4. Interrupt the half time show. 

5. Use strategy which could be considered legally 
right, but morally wrong. 

6. Give out false or misleading weights or other 
data on players. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PLAYERS 
A player should: 

1. Treat officials and opponents with the respect 
that is due them as guests and fellow human beings. 

2. Make his hand shake with opponent sincere and 
wish him luck before contest. 

3. Control his temper at all times on and off the 
playing field or court. 

4. Take victory or defeat without undue emo- 
tionalism, gloating, or show of disappointment. 

5. Congratulate opponents in a sincere way fol- 
lowing either victory or defeat. 

6. Use his influence on and off the court to help 
curb the booing of officials and opponents by spec- 
tators. 

7. Tell students and friends that good crowd be- 
havior makes going on the field or court easier for 
the players. 

8. Explain rules and strategies of the game to 
parents and friends so they can better understand 
why certain decisions are made. 

9. Learn to accept decisions as they are made 
and abide by them. 

10. Cooperate with coach and fellow players in 

(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 

MARCH, 1962 VOL. XXIV — NO. 8 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association a^^&^^^'^ ^' S^ 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. ^a^P^-O ^ 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD fli^^K' \ 

Lexington, Ky. m^m^^m^ I 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (1958-62), Louisville; Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-631, Greenville: Preston Holland (1961-651, Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64), Paintsville; Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^lotn the Commissione'i s Office 






REPORTS NOW DUE 


1. 


1961-62 Basketball Participation List 


2. 


School's Report on Basketball Officials 


3. 


Official's Repoi't on Schools (Basket- 




ball) 



SPRING MEETS 

Tentative dates have been set for the 
various spring meets and tournaments in 
baseball, golf, track, and tennis. They are as 
follows : 

May 4-5, reigional tennis tournaments 
(girls) 

May 7, regional tennis tournaments 
(boys) 

May 8-10, district baseball tournaments 
May 11-12, State Tennis Tournament 
(girls), regional track meets 

May 14-15, State Tennis Tournament 
(boys) 

May 16, regional golf tournaments 
May 18-19, State Track Meet 
May 22-23, State Golf Tournam_ent 
May 24-25, regional baseball tournaments 
June 6-7, State Basketball Tournament 

BOARD ELECTION 
At the copy deadline for this issue of the 
ATHLETE, principals in Sections 3 and 4 
were still balloting in the election for Board 
of Control membership. There were two can- 
didates in Section 3. They were : Supt. Ralph 
C. Dorsey, Caverna Independent District ; 
and Supt. Herschel J. Roberts, Fort Knox 
Dependent Schools. There were also two can- 
didates in Section 4. They were: Prin. Rich- 
ard Greenwell, Shelbyville High School ; and 
Prin. Foster J. Sanders, Louisville Male High 
School. 




Ralph MeRight 

IN MEMORIAM 

When Ralph McRight, the Paducah Tilghman 
football coach, died Januai-y 28th, the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association lost one of its pioneer 
coaches. He had served as president of the Kentucky 
High School Coaches Association. 

McRight came to Kentucky in 1931 directly from 
the University of Alabama where he was regular 
quarterback and blocking back on the 1930 Crimson 
Tide which was unbeaten and untied, and had beaten 
Washington State 24-0 in the Rose Bowl game of 
January 1, 1931. His first assignment was as co- 
coach with teammate John Suther at Hopkinsville 
High School. 

McRight did such a good job at Hopkinsville that, 
when the Tilghman .iob opened up in 1937, the Paducah 
school board promptly employed him and this started 
a saga of success that probably is without parallel 
in the state of Kentucky. From 1937 through the 1961 
season McRight served continuously at Tilghman 
except for the war years of 1942-45 inclusive. His 
record at Tilghman is almost unbelievable — 155 won, 
47 lost and eight tied. He had three undefeated and 
untied teams at Tilghman, and in eight of his twenty- 
one seasons there his squad was unbeaten within the 
state of Kentucky. Only twice during this long span 
of years did a McRight-coached Tornado lose more 
games than it won. 

The death of Coach McRight came at the height of 
his career. His last two teams swept to regional 
championships when other schools had been favored. 
His fellow coaches believed the tall Alabaman got 
more mileage out of his material the last two seasons 
than in some of the years when he piloted the Tor- 
nado to perfect records. He taught hard, clean foot- 
ball. He always insisted that his players abide by the 
rules. "You don't have time to play football if you're 
busy fighting," he would say. Often his teams were 
rated far down the heap until the closing weeks simply 
because McRight refused to run up big scores against 
teams that were outclassed. "The other coach has to 
live, too," he would say. And then, too, he believed in 
using as many of his own boys in a game as possible. 

This respect that Coach McRight had for his fellow 
members of the coaching profession resulted in trib- 
utes from his comrades in the field that came by the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



Page Three 



scores to his widow. Telegrams from all parts of 
the country, floral offerings and contributions to a 
school welfare fund in his memory poured in. His 
funeral was the largest ever in Paducah except poss- 
ibly for the Alben Barkley funeral. 

Paducahans appreciated McRight for many rea- 
sons other than his coaching. He had made a place 
for himself in his community by his civic activities, 
and only his friends knew before his death just how 
much he had contributed personally in counselling and 
aiding children from indigent families so that they 
would stay in school. When Paducah Tilghman inte- 
grated its school this man from the deep south was a 
prime mover in making integration work, and a co- 
captain on his very last team was a Negro boy whom 
McRight often fed and clothed. 

In addition to his coaching duties McRight served 
as assistant principal at Paducah Tilghman, and in 
this role he relieved Principal Bradford Mutchler of 
much of the routine in personal relationships with 
students. So well had he served in this capacity that 
Paducah School Board President William Black ex- 
pressed the opinion that McRight might be missed 
even more as an administrator than as a coach. 

McRight's death was unexpected. While he had 
been hospitalized briefly in December there was no 
evidence of a heart ailment. He visited with friends 
on Sunday afternoon, .January 28th, and even discuss- 
ed his plans for spring practice. He complained early 
Sunday night that he was not feeling well. At 10:25 
p.m. he was dead, the victim of a coronai-y. He was 57 
His survivors include his widow, Mrs. Helen McRight, 
and a son, Terry, a sophomore at Tilghman. Funeral 
services were held at the First Baptist Church in 
Paducah, burial in Hopkinsville. 

— B. D. M. 



TRACK AND FIELD RULES 

The principal rules revisions authorized 
by the Track and Field Committee, effective 
for the 1962 season, are included in the new 
edition of the Track and Field Rules and 
Records Book. They are as follows : 

RULE 3-2: Inspectors are required to sig- 
nal an infraction or irregularity detected dur- 
ing a race by waving a red flag overhead. 

RULE 5-2: It is recommended that the 
Games Committee and Meet Director award 
a tied place in a high jump or pole vault to 
the contestant with the fewest misses at the 
tied height. 

RULE 6-2 : Immediately after the Starter 
instructs competitors to "Set," each of them 
shall at once and without delay assume final 
set positions. Failure to comply shall consti- 
tute a false start. 

RULE 9-1: It counts as a high jump trial 
if the competitor displaces the bar, passes 
under it, crosses the line of the bar extend- 
ed, or leaves the ground in an attempt. 

RULE 9-4: The broad jump board shall 
be rectangular with a width between 8 inches 
(minimum) and 24 inches (maximum). 

CROSS COUNTRY: The Meet Manual 
has been moved forward in the Rules and 



Records Book so that it immediately follows 
Rule 11 (Cross Country Rimning). 

SITUATION RULING 23S: When it be- 
comes necessary to rerun a race, runners 
who have made false starts in the original 
race are not charged with a false start when 
the race is rerun. 

SITUATION RULING 44S: It is illegal 
for a relay runner to leave the exchange 
zone, return to the zone and receive the baton 
there. 

SUPPLEMENT: All tables have been 
brought up-to-date and results for the 1961 
finals are included. 



GOLF TOURNAMENTS 

Eight regional tournaments have been set up in 
golf. These tournaments will be held on May 16 at 
Princeton, Bowling Green, Lou'sville, Jefferson Coun- 
ty, Lexington, Paintsville, Middlesboro, and Coving- 
ton. The State Golf Tournament will be held at Fort 
Knox on May 22-2.3. The assignment of schools by 
regions is as follows: 

Princeton Region — Caldwell County, Fulton, 
Greenville, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Mayfield, 
Murray, North Marshall, Owensboro. Owensboro 
Catholic, Paducah Tilghman, and Providence. 

Bowling Green Region — Adair County. Bardstown, 
Bowling Green, Breckinridge County, College. Eliza- 
bethtown, Fort Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, 
Hartford, High Street, Hiseville, Russellville, St. 
Joseph (Bardstown), Scottsville, Temple Hill, Tomp- 
kinsville. Vine Grove, Warren County. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, DeSales, Flaget, 
Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Jefferson County Region — Aquinas, Bishop David, 
Butler, Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Kentucky Mili- 
tary Institute, Louisville Country Day, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Oldham County, Owen County, Seneca, 
Southern, Shelbyville, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Lexington Region — Clark County, Danville, Frank- 
fort, Franklin County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Leb- 
anon, Lexington Catholic, Madison, Maysville, Millers- 
burg Military Inst., Paris, St. Augustine, St. Patrick, 
Springfield, University High. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Breck- 
inridge Training, Fail-view, Hazard, Paintsville, Pike- 
ville, Prestonsburg. 

Middlesboro Region — Corbin, Cumberland, East 
Main, Hall, McCreary County, Middlesboro, Pine 
Knot, Somerset. 

Covington Region — Beechwood, Covington Catholic, 
Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Holy Cross, Lloyd, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, St. Henry, St. Thomas. 

There is a probability that three or four regional 
tournaments for girls' golf will be set up this year, 
leading to a state tournament. The principals of some 
twenty schools have indicated that their schools may 
have girls' golf teams. At the present time definite 
commitments from the schools involved relative to 
sending teams to the regional tournaments are being 
secured. If the tournaments are attempted, an an- 
nouncement concerning the sites will be in a subse- 
quent issue of the ATHLETE. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 




You are making plans to come to Louisville for the 
Kentucky High School Basketball Tournament as you 
read this column! You are convinced, as is the Dutch- 
man, that sports, properly controlled, contribute 
much to our American way of life. So, let's do some 
timely thinking about hardwood and hardheads! This 
is important because the hardwood is vital to Ameri- 
can youth but the hardheads have nothing to con- 
tribute to either the community's reputation or school- 
boy sports. 

The hai-dheads form four (4) categories: (1) 
Players, (2) Coaches, (3) Spectators, and (4) Offic- 
ials. The categories are not necessarily ranked in 
the order named, nor do they have to be hardheads 
at all — their actions at sports contests either qualify 
or disqualify them. 

Basketball has become more than just a sport. In 
many places it is now a way of life. It is of prime 
importance to the community because it involves the 
boys who play, the men who coach, the spectators 
who cheer, and the officials who penalize. 

During the first tiiree consecutive weekends of 
March, Kentucky's high school teams face district, 
regional, and state tournaments. This column would 
not be worth writing if winning these championships 
were all-important and sportsmanship practices in 
games held no significance in the molding of character 
in our players and student bodies. 

A kid who doesn't play to win and who doesn't 
"bleed inwardly" when he loses just isn't a worthy 
descendant of Daniel Boone and Abraham Lincoln, 
but Kentucky needs young people who learn valuable 
lessons for later life from defeats. Kentucky can do 
without the kid who allows defeat to turn him into a 
hardhead. 

These are the "Ides of March" and it behooves 
players, coaches, spectators, and officials to beware 
lest they menace the game of basketball by being 
haidheads of the hardwood. 

During the "Ides" all players must realize that 
they are the heroes of countless youngsters and the 
examples they set will effect many other young lives. 
In one tournament, I recall two opposing captains who 
refused to shake hands prior to the opening tip-off — 
a couple of hardheads. In another, 1 recall a fine 
competitor who attained a degree of immortality as 
he "stopped" a menacing crowd of supporters with 
these words, "The kids on this team are ashamed of you." 



If a coach sends his boys into the tournaments with 
the philosophy that there is no guilt in breaki.ng 
rules, only in being detected, he qualifies as a hard- 
head. If his conduct at the players' bench reflects 
discredit on himself, his school, and communitv, he 
qualifies again. Coach Knute Rockne of Notre Dame 
taught a grand lesson more than thirty (30) years 
ago when he said, "I could beat the rules, but I won't. 
My teaching respect of the law is important in the 
development of our young men as is my own personal 
example." 

Spectators would not knowingly menace the sport 
they love by unsportsmanlike conduct — yet, they are 
often the hardheads. Booing has never contributed 
anything of value to basketball. It often causes ill 
will and dangerous uncontrolled emotions. I once 
watched several hundred spectators convert them- 
selves into several hundred hardheads as they charged 
onto the floor to "get" the officials. In the mad rush, 
a little three (3) year old girl was trampled and 
crippled. Spectators ought to remember her during 
the "Ides of March." 

Officials, who are poorly trained, constitute the 
final category of hardheads. Good sports require 
good officiating. Eight (8) of Kentucky's finest 
schoolboy officials will work our State Tournament. 
Attitude largely determines an official's efficiency. 
The poorest spectacle of an official is one who abuses 
his authority and deludes himself by thinking that the 
fans have paid to watch him officiate rather than see 
the boys play. It is entirely unnecessary for him to 
preach a sermon to a player or coach who has violated 
a rule. He has no authority to publicly embarrass 
anybody. After all unpardonable sins are not commit- 
ted by making errors. When violations occur, all that 
is required of an official is that he enforce the penalty 
in a firm, pleasant manner. During the "Ides of 
March" it will be proven again that the best officials 
are the most inconspicious ones. 

In schoolboy sports, Kentucky has long been re- 
garded by many as ""The Sportsmanship Capitol of 
the Nation." The conduct of players, coaches, spec- 
tators, and officials in the tournaments will again 
detei-mine if this recognition is merited. The reputa- 
tion of Kentucky is what you make it. 

Valley's Joe Troutman gets the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor for February. Al Gustafson, Jr., says that Joe 
is great in his service to athletes at high school con- 
tests. The Dutchman goes further to say that no_ one 
man in Jefferson County has given more unselfishly 
of himself than Joe. There are lots of fine adults in 
the westend of Jefferson County, because Joe develop- 
ed them, teaching them well and leading them down 
the right paths. The Dutchman salutes one of 
"Nature's Noblemen" — Joe Troutman. 

A noted Jurist once said, "Many a boy joins a 
gang because he never had the chance to join a team." 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first numbber is that of the home phone. 

Cieslack, Albert. Box 97, Richland, Indiana, EL 9-49S0 
Crutcher. Joseph Lamar, 116 Edelen, Vine Grove, TR 7-2448, 

Fort Knox 4-7217 
Groves, Glendal D., 3606 Manslick Rd., Louisville, 366-9202, 

367-2761 
Jenkins, Claude J.. 607 West Stansifer, Clarksville, Indiana 
Kinman, Joe T., 210 Holly Street, Frankfort, 223-6131, 223-8791 
Lee, William A., Box 116. Wallins 

Lockard, Leo A., 6806 Homestead Dr.. Louisville. EM 8-8795 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr., 613 South Second St.. Louisville 
Russell, Joe, Box 213, Russellville, PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
South. William F., 180 Vei-sailles Road. Frankfort, CA 7-6666 
Williams, Tom M., Box 288A-Johnson Acres. Bardstown, 348- 

3079, Fern Creek CE 9-3267 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



Page Five 



"Bud" Wilkinson's Letter 

NOTE: Because of our readers' tremendous interest in and 
support of interscholastic athletics and the general physical 
fitness of all youth in America, we are reprinting a copy of 
a letter written by C. B. "Bud" Wilkinson to members of the 
American Football Coaches Association. Mr. Wilkinson is 
Consultant to the President of the United States on Youth 
Fitness as well as the Director of Athletics at Oklahoma Uni- 
versity. The letter was first printed in the Summer 1961 
issue of "The Mentor." 

Dear Member of the Coaches Association: As you 
may know, I have recently been anpointed the Con- 
sultant to the Pi-esident on Youth Fitness. This selec- 
tion is a great tribute to football. It is not personal. 

As I see it, this is one of the finest things that 
has happened to our profession in recent years. The 
values of our game have been ouestioned repeatedly. 
In some quarters, the advisability of continuance of 
college football has been seriously discussed. Yet, 
President Kennedy feels so strongly about the worth 
of our game that he has selected one of us to work 
with him in the development of a program to im- 
prove the fitness of American Youth. 

The problem of youth fitness is terrifying in its 
implications. You are aware, I am sure, of the appal- 
ling lack of fitness on the part of the majority of 
young people. If our Nation is to survive, we must 
change this situation. The historian Arnold Toynbee 
points out: "Nineteen of twenty-one notable civili- 
zations have died from within — not from conquest 
from without. There were no bands playing and no 
flags flying when these countries decayed. It happen- 
ed slowly in the quiet and the dark when no one was 
aware." 

We are fortunate in knowing what our present 
situation is. We krow how the current is moving. We 
must change the course. 

All of us tell our players that the individual 
participant must unselfishly co.",tribute to the welfare 
of the team without concern about his own status 
or glory. In the fitness effort, each of us will have an 
opportunity to practice what we preach. We should all 
contribute in every possible way to the success of 
this program without concern as to the individual 
benefits we may derive personally or to the increased 
status which might come to our association. 

For many years, there has been a schism between 
the representatives of competitive athletics and the 
representatives of physical education and recreation. 
If we are to improve the fitness of our youth, all 
interested agencies must work together in close har- 
mony. I would like to ask each of you to take the 
initiative in closing ranks with these groups so that 
we will all work together toward the common goal. 

Specifically, what can you do to aid the program? 
I would suggest the following: 

1. In all your speeches make refei'ence to the 
gravity of the fitness problem. 

2. Enthusiastically endorse the first simple, pro- 
posed school program which we will announce shortly. 
Obviously, it will have faults and short-comings. In- 
stead of pointing these out, as will some Physical 
Educators, concentrate on the improvement that will 
result if this or any similar plan is put into operation 
in our schools. 

3. Urge your own school — and your local school 
district — to implement the program. 

4. Go out of your way to work in harmony with 
Physical Educators and Recreation Directors in the 
furtherance of all youth fitness activities. 

This cause is vital to the future welfare of our 
Nation. Our country is at war even though, for the 
moment, no guns are being fired. Our ability to win 



th's contest depends on the vigor and vitality of our 
young citizens. I hope you will do all in your power 
to insure the success of the Youth Fitness effort. 
Sincerely, 

C. B. "Bud" Wilkinson 
Past President, 
American Football 
Coaches Association. 



Films 



Track 

The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed-timing and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — foot roll — single and 
triple air stride^soft versus hard take off — arm 
position. 
Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle develop- 
ment for side arm throw — grips — finger roll — ^heel of 
thumb pressure — finger exercises — cockwise spin — 
hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 
Distance Races, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeplechase 
are demonstrated. Style of dsitance runner is con- 
trasted with that of dash man. Difference in typical 
physiques are shown. Slow motion photography is 
used to analyze movements. 
Distance, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoid- 
ing shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee re- 
flex — straight line running — automatic stride. 
The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 
The Hurdles, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — hurdling, calisthenics — Ijody bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of physiques. 
The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
position — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — body and leg coordination drills 
— flexibility exercises. 
Jumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are 
shown for running high-jump; running broad- jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photography is used for detailed study of foi-m. 
1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, j-s-c-a, 
4 reels, silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are 
shown as Ashland High School won the meet with 26 
points. Tilghman High School of Paducah was second 
with 20% points. New records were set in the Mile 
Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 
Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — ^pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise — 
counter balanced arm action — push drive — jockeying 
for position. 
Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercis- 
es — running action — grip — selecting the pole — take-off 
— Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice train- 
ing. 
The Relays, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass^right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — baton grips — ■ 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



relay starts, underhand action — cup style — overhand 
sprint pass — fly scoop — practice and team work. 
The Sprints, j-s-c-a, 2 reel, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash- 
impact style and natural stretch stride-synchronizing 
leg and arm action-conditioning exercises-starting 
techniques-slow motion of muscular utilization and 
coordination. 
Shotput, j-s-c-a-, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting styles to physiques-tension control-one, 
two, three rhythm-exercises-finger and hand grip- 
finger and wrist snap-foot positions-progressive ten- 
sion and effort-explosive hip snap. 



KAPOS NEWS 

State Tournament Plans 

Again, the Kentucky Association of Pep Organiza- 
tion Sponsors (KAPOS) will have a "Welcome Booth'' 
set up in Freedom Hall somewhere near the main 
entrance, for the sole purpose of registering and 
greeting you. Please stop by and visit with fellow 
sponsors. 

Perhaps you would like to have a part in making- 
known to the public just what is involved in being a 
cheerleader sponsor. If so, we can use you for radio 
interviews or possibly a television program. Mrs. Jane 
McCoy will be in charge of setting up the schedule 
for interviews etc. She has requested that you signify 
your willingness to assist in this program by leaving 
your name and the times you will be available either 
in her box at the Kentucky Hotel or at the KAPOS 
booth. 

KAPOS board members will have a room at the 
hotel on the same floor as the cheerleaders. You are 
encouraged to call on them in any way you see fit. 
They are there to evaluate all cheerleaders but they 
will not be too busy to help you with your problems. 
Principals Must Send Confirmation 

Each principal whose school is participating as 
one of the sixteen teams in the state tournament 
should receive a letter from the Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Cheerleader Sponsors. The letter contains the 
information concerning the basis of selecting an out- 
standing cheerleading squad and requests that the 
principal send, either by wire or special delivery con- 
firmation that the cheerleaders of his school are be- 
ing chaperoned by a well qualified, school approved 
adult. The name of the sponsor should be included in 
this confirmation letter. Send confirmation to: Presi- 
dent Ruth Spurlock (KAPOS), Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. 

The Cheerleader selection will be made on the 
following basis: 

1. Appearance (neatness and general good groom- 
ing. Girls are asked not to wear blue jeans or other 
trousers with their school sweaters.) 

2. Ability to execute the yells. 

3. Ability and effort displayed in control over own 
rooters. 

4. Appropriateness of the choice and time to yell 
(Do not delay the game.) 

5. Conduct while in uniform (gum chewing, smok- 
ing, using intoxicants or profane language. This ap- 
plies to rest rooms, hotels, etc.) 

6. Pep and enthusiasm displayed during cheering. 

7. Sportsmanship (toward opponents and officials.) 
Method of grading, based on a possible 70 point 

total, is as follows: Excellent, 19 pts.; Good, 7 pts.; 
Fair, 5 pts.; Poor, 2 pts. 

Saturday Morning Coffee 
KAPOS extends a cordial invitation for all spon- 
sors and cheerleaders to join them for coffee and 



doughnuts on Saturday morni.-g from 9:00 to 11:00, 
at the Kentucky Hotel. 

Cheerleader Camp 
The first Kentucky Cheerleaders Camp was so 
successful that plans are in the making to have two 
camps this summer. The dates are: August 5-9 and 
August 9-13. Ask for further information at the 
KAPOS booth or contact: Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. 
Milly Rodes, or Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. 



Spor tsmansh ip — Whose Responsibility ? 

(Contir,ued from Page One) 
trying to promote good sportsmanship. 
A player should not: 

1. Be boastful in victory nor bitter in defeat. 

2. Take unfair advantage of his opponent, nor 
advocate such practices. 

3. Make insulting remarks to his opponent be- 
fore, during or after a contest. 

4. Argue with the officials or go through mo- 
tions indicating his dislike for a decision. 

5. Make degrading remarks about officials dur- 
ing or after a game either on the field or from the 
bench. 

6. Criticize coaches or officials after a game. 

7. Lose his temper and start a fight if opponent 
is not playing fairly. 

8. Swear or use profane language. 

9. Make a mockery of good sportsmanship if a 
game is already lost. 

It is obvious that the above points refer almost 
exclusively to the players' conduct on the floor or 
field. 

Players can exercise a great deal of influence 
over student and adult conduct. After all, they are 
the ones for whom the student audience does all the 
shouting and booing. They are usually much admired 
and respected by those students who attend the 
games and if players were to let the other students 
know that their conduct is embarrassing to them, it 
would cause most of the students to reduce the booing 
and insulting of officials and opposing players. This 
can be done best by individual word of mouth, but if 
the opportunity exists, an assembly should be held at 
which players should make their points clear. School 
paper editorials or articles also do a lot of good. 

It is more difficult for the players to influence 
the conduct of adult members of the crowd. The 
individual player can, of course, talk to his parents 
and should be able to get them to understand the 
situation. They in turn can discuss the matter with 
their friends and acquaintances. It would be possible, 
in a really bad situation, for one of the players to 
give a short speech before the "downtown coaches" 
or some of the civic organizations of the community 
and appeal for more sportsmanlike conduct from the 
crowd. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE OFFICIALS 

Well-trained and competent officials are import- 
ant to the success of an athletic program. Their in- 
fluence on crowd and players is of great importance. 
An official should: 

1. Remember that his responsibility is first to 
the players of the game. Their welfare comes before 
all other values. 

2. Play the role of a judicious judge in as un- 
assuming manner as possible. 

3. Know the rules thoroughly and give intelli- 
gent interpretations to the players if asked. 

4. Handle the game with confidence and poise, 
controlling the game from start to finish. 

5. Greet the rival coaches as a part of his first 
duty when appearing before the spectators. 

6. Be cooperative to the fullest extent possible 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



Pag-e Seven 



with his fellow officials and maintain a courteous 
relationship with scorers and timers. 

7. Station himself away from coaches or spec- 
tators at time-outs or delays in the g:ame. 

8. Withdraw from the area of the playing court 
or field at half time. 

9. Maintain poise, dignity, and sense of humor 
when crowd, players or coaches get "on" him. 

10. Actively participate in any organization that 
tries to assure the highest type of officiating for all. 
An official should not: 

1. Over-officiate to the extent of taking the game 
from the players. No "showboating"! 

2. Play for the lime-lig'ht at the expense of 
efficie.^.cy. 

3. Openly acknowledge or react to actions or 
remarks by spectators. 

4. Assume the bearing or manner of a policeman. 

5. Exhibit emotion toward players in enforcing 
the rules. 

6. Humiliate a player for violation or mistake. 

7. Try to even up a previous mistake. 

8. Allow personal bickering to continue between 
opposing players. 

9. Answer spectator remarks or accusations. 

10. Discuss or argue personally with a player, 
coach or spectator in anger or in a heated manner. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF STUDENTS 

Students are very important factors in school 
sportsmanship. Their habits and reactions quite 
largely determine its quality. The better schools are 
those in which there is a willingness on the part of 
the students to share responsibility with the faculty, 
alumni, and community for establishing and main- 
taining good school practices and traditions. 

The following suggestions will serve as a guide 
for the student so that he will know what he should 
or should not do to carry out his responsibility at 
athletic contests. 
The individual student should not: 

1. Consider the visiting team and fans, and offi- 
cials, as guests and treat them as such. 

2. Respect the rights of students from the oppos- 
ing school. Be friendly with them. 

3. Respect the rights of all spectators. 

4. Respect the authority and judgment of the 
coach. 

5. Respect the property of the school and the 
authority of school oflicials. 

6. Cheer both teams as they come on the field of 
play. 

7. Commend or cheer good plays by either team. 

8. Cheer an injured player when he is removed 
from the game. 

9. Support his cheerleaders wholeheartedly. 

10. Accept the officials' decisions as final. 

11. Show self-control at all times during and 
after the game. 

12. Be modest in victory and gracious in defeat. 

13. Consider it a privilege and duty to encourage 
every one (players and spectators alike) to live up 
to the spirit of the rules of fair play and sportsman- 
ship. 

The individual student should not: 

1. Boo or jeer officials or players at any time. 

2. Applaud errors by opponents or penalties in- 
flicted upon them. 

3. Yell while opponent is shooting a free throw. 

4. Yell while the opposing cheerleaders are leading- 
cheers. 

5. Yell for or demand a substitution or withdrawal 
by the coach. 

6. Use profane language at any time during the 
game. 



7. Be obnoxious to his fellow spectators nor ex- 
hibit rowdyism in any form. 

8. Throw things on the field or playing court. 

9. Argue or develop the "sorehead" attitude. 

10. Place bets on the outcome of the game. 

11. Molest the referees after the game. 

12. Criticize his players or coach for losing the 
game. 

13. Boast in victory nor alibi in defeat. 

The individual student should abide by the Golden 
Rule: Do unto others as you would have others do 
unto you. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE TEAM CAPTAIN 
The team captain should: 

1. Greet the opposing captain with genuine friend- 
liness. 

2. Demo/.strate very plainly a respect and friend- 
liness toward the officials — treat them as guests. 
If the captain has any questions on decisions he 
should ask them during a time out in a quiet and 
respectful manner and only for the purpose of clarify- 
ing a ruling so that it may be conveyed to teammates 
and coach. 

3. Not permit teammates to enter into argu- 
ments with opponents, officials or spectators. 

4. Always be ready with a word of praise for 
fine play, whether it be by an opponent or teammate. 

5. Never indicate or let teammates indicate by 
any actions that he or they may feel "robbed" by 
an official. 

6. Never depart from the word or spirit of the 
rules and should discourage teammates from break- 
ing rules. 

7. Play to the limit of his ability and energy and 
motivate teammates to do likewise. Spectators are 
less critical of good, clean play no matter what the 
outcome. 

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE CHEERLEADERS 
Cheerleaders should: 

1. Act as representatives of the student body at 
athletic contests and realize that they are in a posi- 
tion to control the reactions of the crowd. 

2. Be carefully selective about choosing new mem- 
bers for the squad. Prospective cheerleaders selected 
should be students respected by fellow students. The 
most aggressive and loudest individual does not 
necessarily make the best cheerleader. 

3. Set up and describe standards of conduct for 
the cheer squad and for the spectators. 

4. Welcome help and suggestions on crowd con- 
trol from an advisory faculty member or committee. 

5. Serve as ho.sts to the visiting cheerleaders, 
and not as their competitors. Meet them upon ar- 
rival and if time permits introduce them to friends 
and show them the school. Visit at half time. 

6. Give visiting squad right of way when both 
squads attempt to cheer simultaneously and never 
use a long chant to monopolize the cheering time. 

7. Hold a series of well-planned pep meetings in 
which students are reminded that the reputation of 
their school rests partially upon the behavior of its 
students at athletic contests in relation to their own 
team, officials and spectators. The fact should be 
stressed that no derogatory, remarks, calls or booing 
should be made at any time. 

8. Select and create good cheers and signals and 
be discriminating about where and when to use them, 
for example, extend a hearty welcome to visitors, 
recognize plays of merit of the visiting team, signal 
for quiet and discourage attempts to disturb opposmg 
players when shooting for the basket, give recogni- 
tion to all players leaving the game. 

9. Do a good job of executing the cheers, remem- 
bering that cheerleaders are not primarily exhibition- 



Pag-s Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



ists. Avoid an impromptu performance. Cheers should 
be practiced so that they can be given with ease and 
are pleasing to watch. 

10. Appear happy, peppy, well groomed, and in 
command of any situation that might aris?. Cheer- 
leaders should not be coaxed or challe'ged to follow 
in situations where unsportsmanlike behavior might 
be displayed. 

11. Be desirable guests at "away" games — on your 
best manners. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PRINCIPAL 
The principal as the administrative head of the 
school must establish the principles of good sports- 
manship in the mirds of the entire school familv and 
all those who associate with any of the school's ac- 
tivities. He must realize that the type or kind of 
sportsmanship that is nracticed or displayed reflects 
his leadership in the administration of his school be- 
cause the contest is being played by representatives 
of his institution. 
Specifically the principal should: 

1. Practice good sportsmanship himself at all 
times. 

2. Promote the practice of sportsmanship by the 
official school family and the patrons. 

.3. Keep the contests under the official control of 
the school authorities. 

4. Establish a definite policy and procedure rela- 
tive to eligibility and abide by that policy. Be sure 
that this policy is thoroughly understood by all. 

5. Attend the school activities and display a vital 
interest in them. 

6. Be sure he is in accord with the method used 
in selecting and approving the officials selected. 

7. Promote good relationships with all civic or- 
ganizations and acquaint them with their respon- 
sibilities relative to good sportsmanship. 

8. Be sure that all parents thoroughly under- 
stand what the school expects of its players. 

9. Lend active support and approval for all good 
efforts to discuss sportsmanship, crowd behavior, 
game rules, etc., in orde,r to deepen the understand- 
ing of fans about sport. Assembly programs and 
classroom discussion of these matters should receive 
approval. 

10. Establish good rapport with the radio awl 
press relative to their obligation to promote good 
sportsmanship. 

11. Be sure that all players are thoroughly aware 
of his desires relative to their sportsmanship. 

12. Arrange to have the opposing teams meet 
and escorted to their dressing rooms. Their reasonable 
needs should be fulfilled and their stay made com- 
fortable. 

Specifically the principal should not : 

1. Allow any activity to supersede or interfei'e 
with the objectives of education. Victory celebra- 
tions, game rallies, and any unscheduled burst of 
mass enthusiasm should not be allowed to interfere 
with the rest of the school program. 

2. Allow booing of decisions or penalties. 

3. Allow booing at the other team or fans. 

4. Allow interference with the normal procedures 
of the other team. 

5. Allow counting of the score en masse. 

6. Allow throwing of materials. 

7. Allow anyone but those authorized in the play- 
ing area. 

8. Be delinquent in any way in his own behavior. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE 
FACULTY MANAGER 
The faculty manager is not always closely as- 
sociated with the team. He is, therefore, in a much 
better position to talk to officials, sportswriters, and 
spectators than is the coach. At times "straight- 



from-the-shoulder" talk is necessary to arrive at a 
clear understanding of the kind of behavior wanted 
and expected in terms of the values we are trying 
to realize. His greatest opportunities seem to be 
found in his contacts with officials, press, and fac- 
ulty managers of other schools. 
Specifically the faculty manager should: 

1. Provide the opponents with an opportunity to 
help choose officials who will be completely satis- 
factory to both parties. 

2. Employ the best officials obtainable. 

3. Set aside enough money to pay well for an 
officiating job well done. 

4. See that there is sufficient faculty and/or 
police supervision to discourage unruly behavior. 

5. See that all students have a definite under- 
standing of the kind of behavior expected of them. 

6. Try to promote friendly relations with the 
press and "suggest" that articles be written in such 
a way as to emphasize proper values. 

7. Help to increase crowd understanding of rules, 
penalties, strategies, and encourage wider sports 
appreciation among the spectators. 

The faculty manager .should not: 

1. Schedule opponents where traditional rivalry 
has reached such a point that unruly crowd behavior 
has come to be accepted as a matter of course. 

2. Hire officials who call fouls inconsistently, 
permit the game to get out of hand, or in other ways 
encourage a noisy, unruly, crowd. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

It is assumed that the athletic director is in direct 
charge of tlie athletic program. It is pretty well 
established that, in the long run, the departmental 
staff and policies will reflect the kind of philosophy 
held by the departmental head. The general policies 
of the athletic department — the over-all picture — 
will be determined in a large degree by the leadership 
displayed at the top. If mere lip-service is all that 
is given to sportsmanship, it becomes evident in short 
order. 
Specifically the athletic director should: 

1. Secure competent officials for all athletic 
events. 

2. See that adeouate measures are taken to handle 
crowds. 

.3. Print some of the more common rules, regula- 
tions or scoring methods. 

4. Arrange schedules, with the close cooperation 
of the coach, with teams in the same class. 

5. Play schools with like standards. 

6. Find ways and means of bringing student lead- 
ers and groups to see and help in the problem of 
crowd control. 

7. Have only competent and fair men to handle 
the loud-speaker systems. 

8. Cooperate with cheerleaders in the control of 
crowd behavior. 

9. Arrange for student assembly or departmental 
demonstrations on rules and rules interpretations. 

10. Present a true picture to the press of the 
sportsmanship problem and make some suggestions 
of a worthwhile nature. 

11. IVIake known to student body and public the 
departmental policy regarding liquor. 

12. Arrange for school and public clinics for 
the purpose of informing fans of all ages of rule 
changes, the nature of the "inside" game, problems 
in officiating and the like. 

13. Arrange tor pre-game and post-game social 
affairs involving the rival gi'oups and squads. 

The athletic director should not: 

1. Second-guess officials for crowd effect. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



Page Nine 



2. Hand out a lot of "confidential stuff" to create 
a crowd-drawing- story, or create false impressions 
just to pack the stadium to see the "fight." 

3. Be too conspicuous at athletic events. 

4. Publicly criticize rival personnel. 

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF OTHER TEACHERS 

Responsibility for individual conduct whether 
student or adult need not be left only to those in 
charge of athletics. All teachers on the faculty can 
help to create not only an atmosphere of good 
sportsmanship but can be influential in the teaching 
of the specifics of good behavior. 
A teacher should: 

1. Stress good conduct, fair play, and good man- 
ners within the classroom or laboratory and help the 
students make the transfer to sport. 

2. Set an example by treating all students with 
respect for their integrity and in return expect stu- 
dents to earn that respect through their behavior. 

3. Show exemplary behavior at all athletic and 
other public contests or exhibitions. 

4. Encourage and participate in classroom dis- 
cussion of the nature of fair play, the expected con- 
duct at games, and the true meaning of sport as a 
cultural element and an educatio.-.al tool in the 
American scene. 

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
Board members generally have an interest in 
maintaining a good school program carried on under 
democratic principles. They are interested in all 
phases of education that will help the students to be 
of greater service to society in our democracy. With 
these things in mind there are certain responsibilities 
the board must accept in regard to sportsmanship. 
The Board of Education should: 

L Attend all athletic contests involving the school. 

2. As members of civic organizations, foster a 
feeling of good will toward the school's athletic pro- 
gram in the organization. 

3. Make broad policies relating to sportsmanship 
in the school. 

4. Develop in the schools a good program of phy- 
sical education and interscholastic activities for all, 
and insist on a steady development toward set objec- 
tives in this program. 

5. Insist that employees of the school consider 
sportsmanship an ultimate aim in the education of 
the students, correcting those individuals at fault 
at a time convenient and in a manner adequate for 
the situation. 

6. Prohibit the use of alcoholic beverages at all 
contests. 

7. Provide for safe and adequate athletic facilities. 
The Board of Education should not: 

1. Employ a coach solely on the basis of the record 
of wins and losses. 

2. Have selfish or gambling interests in the out- 
comes of any athletic teams or contests. 

3. Be autocratic in their policies concerning the 
running of the school and its athletics. 

4. Retain a coach who resorts to unethical prac- 
tices in the coaching of athletics. 

5. Use influence in putting certain boys on the 
team, regardless of their abilities. 

6. Set poor examples for the public by their con- 
duct at athletic games. 

COMMUNICATIONS 
The press, radio and television personnel are 
often influential in molding public opinion and be- 
havior concerning interscholastic sport. Writers and 
commentators frequently have opportunities to point 
up good and bad behavior and make it a point of 
public discussion. Specifically there are many things 
which they should and should not do in the interests 



of better competitive athletics. 
Things they should do: 

1. Conduct good sportsmanship program in the 
press and over the air. 

2. Give accurate facts when disseminating in- 
formation. 

3. Discourage betting on amateur games. 

4. Be an example of the good loser when the 
home team loses. 

5. Look for acts of courtesies of players during 
the game and write favorably of such. 

6. Continue to make something of the game after 
the substitutes enter. 

7. Be familiar with sports they are covering. 

8. Play up scholarship as well as athletic prowess 
of plavers on teams. 

9. Honor all boys on teams as team players. 

10. Explain something of the background of the 
teams, the rules of the game, and its possibilities. 
Things they shou'd not do: 

1. Criticize the judgment of the coach in making 
substitutions and other decisions without checking 
facts. 

2. Give individual players the "hero" type of pub- 
licity or conversely, make a "goat" out of some player 
because he had misfortune in the contest. 

3. Criticize the officials' decisions openly without 
knowing facts. 

4. Show partiality to the home team. 

5. Offer alibis if the home team loses the game. 

6. "Ride" the players. 

7. Give all the credit to a few players for winning 
or losing the game. 

8. Give out misleading information. 

9. Make professional matches out of amateur 
sports. 

10. Mislead the public as to the characteristics of 
the opponents of the home team. 

11. Forget to mention the boys on the bench and 
the good behavior of the crowd at the game when 
this is in evidence. 

12. Do anything to build up snobbery on the part 
of parents, school or public. 

CIVIC LEADERS AND FANS 

Community organizations and civic leaders can go 
far in setting the "tone" of sportsmanship at school 
and college games. Alumni members of Booster Clubs, 
"downtown quarterbacks," Lions, Kiwanians, Rotar- 
ians, members of the Chamber of Commerce, and the 
rest of the public have a responsibility for sportsman- 
ship. 
Things public leaders can do: 

1. Get behind the "Booster Club" movement. Be- 
come an active force in the club and encourage en- 
thusiasm for the team regardless of the game results. 

2. Recognize achievement and applaud good play 
on both teams. 

3. Keep in touch with the authorities who do the 
hiring of coaches. Know them and know the coaches 
so that an opinion about the quality of leadership 
the boys are getting can be voiced. 

4. Encourage the establishing of a salary scale 
for athletic teachers in keeping with the duties and 
job done. 

5. Be ever willing to attend and participate at 
banquets. If called upon to "glorify" the team be 
sure to point out to the boys the real values of the 
game. Don't go haywire on the "win them all" idea. 

6. Discourage and if necessary expose the sub- 
sidizing of players. Encourage the expression of 
opinion freely on the subject. Let the coach know 
that his job is the developing of players, not the hiring 
of players. 

7. Accept without public question the judgment of 



Pag:e Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



the coach as he names starting: lineups and makes 
substitutions. 

8. Leave the game if intoxicated or unable to 
control temper. 
The public should not: 

1. Attempt to influence the director, superinten- 
dent, or the school board to hire their coach on the 
basis of a terminal contract. The coach is always at 
his best when little or no pressure is applied. All 
civic leaders should refrain from such practice. 

2. Award prizes of any sort except when such is 
acceptable to the educational authorities. 

3. Spread false interpretations or rumors con- 
cerni.ig the sport, coach, or players. 

4. Supplement the coach's earning- from private 
purses. 

5. Support any movement in discriminating against 
any member of the team or squad. 

6. Question the coach's judgment with resentment. 

7. Bribe a coach, player or official. 

8. Encourage any foul or unfair play on the court 
or field. 

9. Hoot, boo, jeer, or otherwise carry on in a dis- 
courteous manner to officials, visiting teams, or visit- 
ing public. 

10. Enter the playing area at any time to parti- 
cipate in a controversy. 

11. Destroy property of the opposing school or 
community. 



REGIONAL TRACK MEETS 

The Board of Control has established twelve track- 
regions for 1962. The scheduled dates for the regional 
meets are May 11-12. Only first and second place 
winners in the regions will qualify for the State Meet. 
Sites of the meets are Murray State College, Daviess 
County High School, Western Kentucky State College, 
Fort Knox High School, Shawnee High School, Eastern 
High School, Bellevue High School, University of 
Kentucky, Centre College, Union College, Elkhorn 
City High School, and Ashland High School. 

The assignment of schools by regions is as follows: 

Region 1 at Murray — Caldwell County, Christian 
County, Farmington, Fulton, Heath, Hopkinsville, 
Mayfield, Murray, Murray College, South Marshall, 
Tilghman, Trigg County. 

Region 2 at Owensboro — Attucks, Calhoun, Critten- 
den County, Daviess County, Douglas (Henderson), 
Hancock County, Henderson, Henderson County, Madi- 
sonville, Morganfield, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, 
Providence, Rosenwald (Providence), Sacramento, 
Slaughters, Sturgis. 

Region .S at Bowling Green — Alvaton, Austin 
Tracy, Bowling Green, Cavsrna, College, C!ub Run, 
Edmonson County, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Guth- 
rie, High Street, Hiseville, Lincoln (Franklin), Met- 
calfe County, Park City, Russellville, Temple Hill, 
Tompkinsville, Warren County. 

Region 4 at Fort Knox — Breckinridge County, 
Campbellsville, Clarkson, Durham (Campbellsville), 
Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Glendale (3reensburg, 
Howevalley, Irvington, LaRue County, Lebanon 
.Junction, Meade County, Rineyville, Vine Grove, 
Taylor (iounty. 

Region 5 at Louisville — Atherton, Central, duPont 
Manual, DeSales, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee. 

Region 6 at Middletown — Bishop David, Butler, 
Durrett, Eastem, Fairdale, Fern Creek, Kentucky 
Military Institute, Lincoln Institute, Louisville Coun- 
try Day, Oldham County, Pleasure Ridge Park, Seneca, 
Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Region 7 at Bellevue — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Campbell County, Dayton, Deming, Dixie 
Heights, Grant County, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, 



Ludlow, Newport, Newport Catholic, St. Henry, Simon 
Kenton, Walton-Verona, William Grant. 

Region 8 at Lexington — Anderson, Berea, Bourbon 
County, Bryan Station, Carlisle, Clark County, Du- 
Bois, Dunbar (Lexington), Fleming County, Founda- 
tion, Frankfort, Franklin County, Georgetown, Har- 
rodsburg, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, 
Madison, Madison Central, Midway, Millersburg Mili- 
tary Institute, Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling, 
Paris, Paris Western, Scott County. Shelby County, 
Shelbyville, University High, Versailles. 

Region 9 at Danville — Bai-dstown, Bloomfield, Bur- 
gin, Camp Dick Robinson, Danville, Old Kentucky 
Home, Paint Lick, Parksville, St. Catherine, St. 
Charles, St. Joseph (Bardstown), Spring-field, Wayne 
County. 

Region 10 at Barbourville — Barbourville, Bell Co- 
unty, Bush, Clay County, Corbin, Cumberland, East 
Benham, Evarts, Hall, Harlan, Hazel Green, Knox 
Central, Lily, London, Loyall, Lynn Camp, McCreary 
County, Middlesboro, Pineville, Poplar Creek, Rosen- 
wald (Barbourville), Rosenwald (Harlan), Somerset, 
Wallins, West Main (Lynch), Williamsburg. 

Region 11 at Elkhorn City — Belfry, Buckhorn, Dike 
Combs, Dunham, Elkhorn City, Fleming-Neon, Haz- 
ard, Hellier, Jenkins, Johns Creek, M. C. Napier, 
Paintsville, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Virgie, Wheel- 
wright, Whitesburg. 

Region 12 at Ashland — Ashland, Boyd County, 
Catlettsburg, Flat Gap, Greenup, Meade Memorial, 
Morgan County, Oil Springs, Raceland, Russell, War- 
field, Wurtland. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENTS— BOYS 

On May 7 seven regional tournaments will be held. 
The sites are Bowling Green, Fort Knox, Louisville, 
Jefferson County, Bellevue, Lexington, and Richmond. 
The State Tournament will be held in Louisville on 
May 14-1.5. The assignment of schools by regions is 
as follows; 

Bo'ivling Green Region — Attucks, Bowling Green, 
Caverna, (College, Franklin-Simpson, Greenville, Hop- 
kinsville, Memorial (Hardyville), Russellville, Warren 
County. 

Fort Knox Region — Douglass (Henderson), Eliza- 
bethtown Catholic, Fort Knox, Greensburg, LaRue 
County, Lynnvale, Owensboro, St. Joseph, Vine Grove. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, DeSales, du 
Pont Manual, Flaget, Shawnee, St. Xavier. 

Jefferson County Region — Bishop David, Durrett, 
Eastern, Fern Creek, Kentucky Military Institute, 
Louisville Country Day, Pleasure Ridge Park, Seneca 
Southern, Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Dayton, 
Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, Ludlow, Newport Catholic, 
Simon-Kenton. 

Lexington Region — Fleming County, Frankfort, 
Franklin County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Millersburg 
Military Institute, Paris, Shelbyville, University. 

Richmond Region — Ashland, Breckinridge Train- 
ing, Camargo, Danville, Foundation, Hazel Green, 
Paintsville, Somerset, Stanford, Whitesburg. 
TENNIS TOURNAMENTS— GIRLS 

Seven regional tournaments have been set up for 
girls tennis. These tournaments will be held on May 
4-5 at Murray, Bowling Green, Louisville, Jefferson 
County, Bellevue, Lexington and Richmond. The State 
Tennis Tournament for Girls will be held at Shawnee 
Park in Louisville on May 11-12. The assignment of 
schools by regions is as follows: 

Murray Region—- Attucks, Douglass (Henderson), 
Henderson, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Murray. 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, Caverna, 
College, Fort Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Greensburg, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAilCH. 1962 



Page Eleven 



Memorial (Hardyville), Owensboro, Vine Grove, War- 
ren County. 

Louisville Region — Central, duPont Manual, Male. 

Jefferson County Region — Durrett, Eastern, Fair- 
dale, Fern Creek, Southern, Waggener. 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Dayton, 
Highlands, Ludlow. 

Lexington Region — Fleming County, Franklin Co- 
unty, Henry Clay, Lafayette, Paris, Shelbyville, Uni- 
versity. 

Richmond Region — Ashland, Breckinridge Train- 
ing, Camargo, Danville, Foundation, Hazel Green, 
Montgomery County, Somerset. 



HOSPITALITY COMMITTEE 

The following events and functions of the Hospi- 
tality Committee in connection with the State High 
School Basketball Tournament will be of interest to 
tournament visitors: 

A TEENTOWN GAME & LOUNGE RO^M will 
be set up on the second floor of the Armorv Building 
for Friday morning from 8:00 A. M. to Noon, and 
again on Saturday morning from 8:00 A. M. to 10:30 
A. M. 

A DANCE will be held in the Flag Room of the 
Kentucky Hotel on Thursday night, March 15, from 
10:30 P."M. to 1:00 A. M. Price on the dance is 75c 
per couple or 50c per individual. 

CINERAMA: "South Sea Adventure" at the 
Rialto Theatre, March 16 at 11:15 P. M. Price per 
ticket is $1.00 which is less than half of regular cost. 

SWIMMING from 9:00 A. M. to 10:00 A. M. daily 
at the Henry Clay Hotel pool — 75c. 

RECREATION CENTER, West wing of Fair- 
grounds. Free basketball, tennis, etc., daily. Free golf 
at all City of Louisville golf courses daily. 

INFORMATION DESKS will be set up and manned 
at both the Kentucky Hotel and the Fairgrounds. 

HOSPITALITY ROOM at Freedom Hall for coach- 
es, referees, school principals and officials will be 
opened daily, 30-minutes before game time. All who 
will be eligible to enjoy the Hospitality Room should 
come prepared with their identification cards from 
the various associations, etc., as the door will be 
handled by a uniformed attendant who will request 
seeing their cards. 

PRACTICE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR TEAMS 
will be available at the following schools: Louisville 
Male High School, 911 South Brook Street; Sally B. 
Rutherford School, 301 Southland Boulevard; Hazel- 
wood School, 1325 Bluegrass Avenue; St. Xavier High 
School, 1606 Poplar Level Road; St. George School, 
1819 Standard Avenue. Principals or coaches may 
phone Louisville Male High School, 582-2613, and 
make arrangements for the use of these gyms. Con- 
tact Foster Sanders, Principal. 

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION BADGES: All stu- 
dents, in order to participate in this program and to 
be given advantages of the special prices, must have 
an identification badge. These are to be picked up at 
the Information Desk at the Fairgrounds Coliseum. 

TRANSPORTATION: Cabs displaying signs will 
charge a flat rate to the Fairgrounds from the hotel 
district as they did at the previous Tournament. 
Buses will be identified with signs and will give 
special attention to service from downtown to the 
Fairgrounds at regular rates. 

PARKING OF SCHOOL BUSES at the Fair- 
grounds has been handled at the rate of 25c per bus. 



What Did The Ref Call? 

"What did the Ref call?" is a question 
commonly raised by basketball bench of- 
ficials, coaches, spectators and press, radio 
and television reporters throughout the coun- 
try only because far too many officials fail 
in their responsibility to signal properly. 
Most certainly this is to be regretted. It de- 
tracts from the enjoyment of the game and 
is a totally unnecessary tragedy. Proper sig- 
nals by officials wlil make the question un- 
necessary. 

The signals to be used by basketball of- 
ficials are informative, dignified and mean- 
ingful. They have been adopted by the Na- 
tional Basketball Rules Committee for na- 
tion-wide use. These signals, which were de- 
veloped after much research and study, will 
most adequately serve the intended purpose. 
They will contribute to uniformity wherever 
basketball is played in this land of ours and 
make it possible for everyone viewing the 
game to interpret the officials' decisions cor- 
rectly. 

An official who signals correctly keeps 
the coaches and spectators informed. This is 
as it should be. It is his duty to correctly sig- 
nal and those who do not have no place as 
officials. The game would be much better 
without them. It is important that players, 
coaches, spectators and press representatives 
know the foul or violation which causes a 
penalty. Naturally, the use of the official set 
of signals limits the free wheeling of some 
of the acrobats who are masquerading as 
officials. Proper signaling is not dramatic 
enough for these actors. It limits their oppor- 
tunity to show off. It restricts the opportun- 
ities for some officials who desire to satisfy 
an unbounded ego. Some of these improvis- 
ors can, with little effort, go through an en- 
tire game, perhaps a season, without once 
using the authorized signals. They jump, 
pull, jerk, do a St. Vitus dance, extend their 
posteriors in an adapted lumbago posture, and 
frequently look like a monkey on a string. 
When making a call, some of them go into 
contortions that make the Twist attractive 
and graceful by comparison. The gyrations 
that these phonies go through after blowing 
the whistle are positively offensive. 

Without question, they feel inadequate 
and try to detract from their call by holler- 
ing, yelling, punching, kicking or pulling an 
arm after blowing the whistle. They bring 
justifiable antagonism and resentment to 
themselves from all who are participating or 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1962 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 
FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 
Phone Triangle 3-3623 



Daring the State Toamament oar representative 



Distributors of: 



Spanjian 

Southern 

Nocona 

Wilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky. 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 



Room 926 at the Watterson Hotel. 

Bike 

Cramer 

Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R, Moore Gym Suits 

Riddell Helmets & Shoes 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



7-3977 



Dick Wallace 



viewing the game. They emphasize their 
whistle blowing and support it with these un- 
called for gestures. This is proof positive 
that their calls are not adequate and that 
the calls cannot stand on their merit. An in- 
creasing number of athletic administrators 
are acknowledging these expressions of bad 
taste and inadequacy and are refusing to en- 
gage men who cannot officiate basketball 
without making a public display of themselv- 
es. Refusing to assign them to games is 
progress. 

Officials' organizations must accept the 
responsibility of insisting that their mem- 
bers use the adopted signals. No officials' 
association worth its salt teaches or instructs 
its members to use signals other than those 
officially authorized by the National Basket- 
ball Rules Committee. Most officials' groups 
do teach the proper signals but, unfortunate- 
ly, not all of them insist that their members 
use them. 

There is nothing sacred about the present 
signals. If any are inadequate or inapprop- 
riate, they should be and can be changed. 
This should be done through established 



channels and, most definitely, not through 
individual improvising. If changes are nec- 
essary, and at this time there is no evidence 
any are, the National Basketball Committee, 
which is always ready to accept any sugges- 
tion which will contribute to the improve- 
ment and enjoyment of the game by the play- 
ers and spectators, should be petitioned. 

Until a need for a change is demonstrat- 
ed, game administrators must insist that 
officials use the proper signals. Those of- 
ficials who cannot comply because they are 
unable to learn the proper signals, or be- 
cause they cannot give them, or because use 
of them does not afford an opportunity of 
attracting enough attention to themselves, 
or who, for any reason, fail to use the desig- 
nated signal, should not be engaged. The 
game is better off without them. Let's hurry 
them on their way. 

The good official will let people know 
what he calls by giving the right signal prop- 
erly. 

Clifford B. Fagan, 

Secretary, 

National Basketball Committee 



ANNOUNCING OUR IMPROVED 
FOOTBALL COVERAGE FOR 1962-63 

$ 500.00 Basic Accident Medical Expense 
$1,750.00 Overall Maximum Benefit 
$L000.00 Accidental Death Benefit 
$L000.00 Maximum Dismemberment Schedule 

Offered In Conjunction With An 
Excellent Student Accident Policy 

$3,000.00 Basic Accident Medical Expense 
$8,000.00 Overall Maximum Benefit 
$2,000.00 Accidental Death Benefit 
$8,000.00 Maximum Dismemberment Schedule 

PROMPT CLAIM SERVICE! 

WE INVITE YOUR INQUIRIES. 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 

^/te KiHffJlen G(unfia4Uf, general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, Kif. PHONE 2-8522 



HUNT'S ATHLETrC GOODS COMPANY 
For all of your 1962 Spring Sports 

With the baseball and track season just around the corner let us help 
you take care of all your supplies. 

BASEBALL EQUIPMENT 

We have in stock baseball uniforms, two-piece shirt and pants trimmed 
ready for immediate lettering to your specifications at prices $7.95, $9.95, 
$11.95, and $13.95. Samples and swatches sent upon request. 

MacGregor No. 97 official KHSAA Baseballs, Reach American League 
baseball, Hunt's official League balls, at all prices from $1.60 each up to 
$2.35 each. 



Famous Louisville Slugger Bats and all the other items to outfit your 



team. 



TRACK SUPPLIES 

We have a complete stock on track this year including vaulting poles, 
shoes, uniforms, discus, javelins, timers, batons, shots etc. Write us for 
complete school prices on all your Spring Sports including softball, tennis, 
golf and swimming. 

K. E. A. 

When in Louisville for the K. E. A. be sure to visit HUNT'S Display 
in the Kentucky Hotel on April 4, 5 and 6. 

Our salesmen will be on hand to show you all our new 1962 Spring and 
Summer as well as Fall and Winter merchandise. 




HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




Hiqh School AthMe 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION -- 1962 




(Left to Right): John Tayh)r, Ken Anderson, Bill Smith, Vince Stamp. 
Jim Kupper, Bob Bohn, Bob Schmidt, Mike Silliman, Bill Cassidy, Bill Musselman, 
Bill Nold, William Kaufman, Jim Duerr, Wayne Gates. 



District Tournament Games Won 

St. Xavier 54-29 Flaget 

St. Xavier 60-48- Central 




Regional Tournament Games Won 

St. Xavier 59-58 Central 

St. Xavier 49-40 Malt 

St. Xavier 57-56 Seneca 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 1362 




Ashland — Runner-Up 
1962 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Kow: Vernon Caldwell. Ken Johnson, Earl Wheeler, Bob Yancey, Farkie 
Beam. Second Row: Mgr. Tom Clements, George Branham, Jim McKenzie, Mike Sexton, Larry Fair- 
child, Mgr. Mike Nestor. Third Row: Mgr. Quintin Callihan, Don Stewart, David Turpin, Larry Con- 
ley, David Hall, Coach Bob Wright. 

Breathitt County — Semi-Finalist 
1962 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Cheerleaders Lucinda Landrum, Joyce Watts, Beverly Bach, 
Sally K. Brown, Dolores Callihan, Louise Howell. Second Row: Supt. Marie R. Turner, Mgr. David 
Conway, Jackie Fugate, Eugene Turner, James Turner, Tommy Gene Turner, Mackie Turner, Henry 
D. Combs, Reuben Spicer, Don Allen, Lee Hounshell, Richard Sallee, Bill Childers, Mgr. E. B. 
demons, Prin. Millard ToUiver, Coach Earl Stevens. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Orgfon of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV — No. 9 



APRIL, 1962 



.00 Per Year 



1962 Annual Meeting 

This issue of the ATHLETE went to press just 
prior to the time of the annual meetinq- of the Assoc- 
iation. The business meeting- of the K.H.S.A.A. was 
scheduled to be held on Thursday, Anril 5, at 2:30 
P.M., in the Terrace Room of the Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville. The dinner meeting was to follow at 6:30 
P.M., and was to be held in the Crystal Ballroom of 
the Brown Hotel. 

The principal sneaker at the dinner meeting was to 
be Dr. Prank G. Dickey, President of the University 
of Kentucky. Presentation of the Game Guy Award 
was scheduled for the meeting. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the K.H. 
S.A.A. Constitution, the foF owing changes in the 
Constitution, By-Laws, and Tournament Rules were 
to be acted upon by the Delegate Assembly: 
PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that "twenty" and 
'twenty-four" be substituted for "twenty-four" and 
"thirty" respectively in the second sentence of By- 
Law 21, and that the last se.ntence of the By-Law be 
amended to read as follows: "In one county, con- 
ference, or invitational tournament the games play- 
ed shall not be counted against the game limit." This 
change, if adopted, is not to take effect until the be- 
ginning of the 1963-64 school year. 
PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes that the following- 
sentence be added to By-Law 21 : "Exclusive of tourna- 
ment games, no more than six basketball games shall 
be played on nights preceding school days." This 
change, if adopted, is not to take effect until the be- 
ginning- of the 1963-64 school year. 
PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control proposes that another para- 
graph be added to By-Law 21, referi-ing- to football 
games, to read as follows: "Exclusive of conference 
and state playoffs, no more than ten football games 
may be played by a team representing a member 
school during the regular season. Any scrimmage or 
practice game in which players from another school 
take part shall be counted agai.ist this game limit.'' 
This change, if adopted, is not to take effect until the 
beginning- of the 1963-64 school year. 
PROPOSAL IV 

The Board of Control proposes a new By-Law to 
read as follows: "All football games to be played 
during any season shall be scheduled on or before 
September 1 of that seaso.i. The Commissioner shall 
have authority to extend this deadline in hardship 
cases." 

PROPOSAL V 

The Northern Kentucky Principals Association pro- 
poses that By-Law 21 be titled to read "Number of 
Football and Basketball Games," and that the By- 
Law be rewritten to read as follows: "Schools shall 
be limited to nine regular scheduled football games 
plus play-off games. Play-off games shall be deter- 
mined by the Commissioner. A school maintaining a 
football team shall not play more than eighteen regu- 
( Continued on Page Five) 



NEW BOARD MEMBERS 




Ralph C. Dorsey 



Foster J. Sanders 



Supt. Ralph C. Dorsey cf the Caverna Independent 
School District a.-.d Prin. Foster J. Sanders of the 
Louisville Male High School will represent Sections 3 
and 4 respectively on the Boai'd of Control for a four- 
year period, beginning July 1, 1962. Both men will 
be serving on the Board for the first time. 

Ralph C. Dorsey, currently President of the Ken- 
tucky Coaches Association, was born in Scottsville 
but has lived most of his life in Horse Cave. He 
graduated from Horse Cave High School in 1935, later 
attending Indiana University on a basketball scholar- 
ship and receiving- his B.S. degree with a major in 
Physical Education. 

After serving five years in the United States 
Army during World War II, Captain Dorsey returned 
to his home town and served as a teacher and coach 
for four years. Durnig this time he attended summer 
school at Western Kentucky State College and re- 
ceived his M.A. degree in 1952. 

The sectional representative lettered in basketball 
a:'.d baseball for four years in high school, and he re- 
ceived varsity basketball letters for three years at 
Indiana. He was twice an all state high school player 
in Kentucky. From 1950 through 1954 he served as a 
12-grade principal, basketball and baseball coach for 
the Caverna High School. For the past seven years 
he has served as superintendent of the Caverna 
School District a.id still continues coaching basketball 
and baseball. In 1953 the Caverna High basketball 
team won third place in the state basketball tourney, 
and the 1951 team lost out in the first round of the 
state tourney. For the past three years the Caverna 
High baseball teams have played in the state tourna- 
ments, and this past June the team won the State 
Baseball Title for the hign schools of the Common- 
wealth. 

Mr. Dorsey is an active member of the Horse Cave 
Methodist Church where he has served as Church 
School Superintendent, teacher, and now as church 
lay leader. He belongs to the various educational as- 
sociations of the local, state and national levels. He 
serves actively in the Rotary Club and the Chamber 
(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



APRIL, 1962 



VOL. XXIV— NO. 9 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hierh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexinffton, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

Aaaistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexincrton, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1958-62), Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1969-63), Georitetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (19B8-62), Louisville; Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63). Greenville: Preston Holland (1961-65). Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65). Danville; Oran C. Teater (1960- 
8«). Paintsville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

-f*om the Commissioned, s Cjjjice 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky May 18-19 

(Time is Eastern Standard Time) 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1961-62 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

The district bassball tonrnaments are scheduled 
to be held on May 8-U). The r3gional tournaments 
will be held on May 21-25, and the State Baseball 
Tournament is scheduled to b3 played at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, Lexington, on June 6-7. The as- 
sigr.ment of schools to the various districts and regions 
is as follows: 

MURRAY REGION 

Christian County District — Attucks, Christian Co- 
unty, Dawson Springs, Hopkinsville, Trigg County. 

Murray District — Benton Calloway County, Mur- 
ray, Murray College, North Marshall, South Marshall. 

Reidland District— Ballard, Heath, Reidland, St. 
John, Tilghman. 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, Cuba, Fancy 
Farm, Fulton County, Hickman County, Lowes, May- 
field, Sedalia, Wingo. 

Caldwell County District — Caldwell County, Crit- 
tenden County, Fredonia, Livingston Central, Lyon 
County. 

OWENSBORO REGION 

Henderson County District — Henderson, Henderson 
County, Holy Name, Morga.-field, St. Vincent, Sebree, 
Sturgis. 

Hancock County District — Breckinridge County, 
Frederick-Fraize, Irvington, Hancock County, Meade 
County. 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Centertown, 
Fordsville, Hartford, Horse Branch. 

Daviess County District — Daviess County, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, Western. 

Madisonville District — Bremen, Calhoun, Clay, 
Dixon, Earlington, Hanson, Livermore, Madisonville, 
Rosenwald (Madisonville), Slaughters, South Hopkins. 

Central City District — Central City, Crakesboro 
Community, Graham, Greenville, Hughes-Kirk, Muhl- 
enberg Central. 



(4 heats'), 2 
Put and Pole 

, 2 from each 

, 2 from each 

, 2 from each 

(4 heats), 2 

2 from each 

2 from each 

■om each heat 



FRIDAY 

.3:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 
from each heat qualify for Finals; Shot 
Vault, Finals. 

3:20 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats) 
heat qualify for Finals. 

.3:35 P.JVI.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats) 
heat qualify for Finals. 

4:05 P.M.— 440 Yard Dash (4 heats), 
heat qualifv for Finals. 

4:30 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 
from each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:50 P.M.— 880 Yard Run (4 heats), 
heat oualifv for Finals. 

5:15 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P.M.— Mile Relay (4 heats), 2 fr 
qualify for Finals. 

S.\TURDAY 

1:00 P.M. — High Jump, Discus, and Broad Jump. 

2:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P.M.— Mile Run 

2:45 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P.M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P.M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P.M.— Mile Relay 



LEITCHFIELD REGION 

Warren County District — Alvaton, Bowling Green, 
Bristow, College, Franklin-Simpson, High Street, Lin- 
coln (Franklin), North Warren, Richardsville, Warren 
County. 

Auburn District — Adairville, Auburn, Clifty, Guth- 
rie, Russellville, Todd County, Todd County Training. 

Tompkinsville District — Allen County, Austin- 
Tracy, Clinton County, Gamaliel, Glasgow, Hiseville, 
Metcalfe County, Park City, Scottsville, Temple Hill, 
Tompkinsville. 

Caverna District — -Caverna, Cub Run, LaRue Co- 
unty, Memorial (Hardyville), Munfordville. 

Leitchfield District — Butler County, Clarkson, Ed- 
monson County, Leitclifield. 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Campbells- 
ville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. 
Charles, St. Francis, Taylor County. 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Bloomfield, Fred- 
erickstown, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Washington, St. 
Joseph, Shepherdsville, Spring-field, Willisburg. 

Vine Grove District — Elizabethtown, Elizabethtown 
Catholic, Ft. Knox, Glendale, Howevalley, Lynnvale, 
Rineyville, Sonora, Vine Grove. 

LOUISVILLE REGION 

St. Xavier District — Central, Flaget, Shawnee, St. 
Xavier. 

Southern District — Bishop David, Butler, Durrett, 
Fail-dale, Fern Creek, Pleasure Ridge, Southern, 
Valley. 

Manual District — Atherton, DeSales, Male, Manual. 

Trinity District — Aquinas, Eastern, Kentucky Mili- 
tary Inst., Louisville Country Day, Seneca, Trinity, 
Waggener. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



Page Three 



NEWPORT REGION 

St. Henry District — Beechwood, Boone County, 
Floyd, Simon-Kenton, St. Henry. 

Dixie Heights District — Covington Catholic, Dixie 
Heig'hts, Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow. 

Silver Grove District — Campbell County, High- 
lands, Silver Grove, St. Thomas. 

Grant Countv District — Falmouth, Grant County, 
Williamstown, Walton Verona. 

Newport District — Bellevuo, Dayton, Newport, 
Newpoi't Catholic. 

Tollesboro District — Bracken County, Deming, 
Fleming County, Mason County, Maysville, Pendleton, 
St. Patrick, Tollesboro. 

LEXINGTON REGION 

Versailles District — Anderson, Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Georgetown, Midway, Scott County, Ver- 
sailles. 

Paris District — Bourbon County, Carlisle, Cynthi- 
ana, Harrison County, Millersburg Military Institute, 
North Middletown, Paris, Western (Paris). 

Mercer Couray District — Buckeye, Camp Dick 
Robinson, Danville, Harrodsburg, Junction City, Lan- 
caster, Mackville, Mercer County, Parksville, Perry- 
ville. 

Liberty District — Crab Orchard, Liberty, Lincoln 
(Stanford), McKinney, Memorial (Waynesburg), 
Middleburg, Mt. Vernon, Paint Lick, Stanford. 

Carrollton District — Carrollton, Eminence, Galla- 
tin County, Henry County, Owen County, Trimble 
County. 

Lexington District — Bryan Station, Dunbar (Lex- 
ington), Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, 
Lexington Catholic, University. 

Shelbyville District — Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
County, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Taylorsville. 

Richmond District — Berea, Estill County, Irvine, 
Madison, Madison Central. 

MIDDLESBORO REGION 

Somerset District — Burnside, Ferguson, McCreary, 
Monticello, Nancy, Pine Knot, Pulaski County, Russell 
County, Somerset. 

Hazel Green District — Bush, Clay County, Corbin, 
Hazel Green, Lily, London. 

Lee County District — Annville, Jackson, Lee Coun- 
ty, McKee, Oneida, Owsley County, Powell County, 
Tyner, Wolfe County. 

Middlesboro District — Barbourville, Bell County, 
Henderson Settlement, Lincoln (Middlesboro), Lone 
Jack, Middlesboro, Red Bird. 

Lynch District — Black Star, Cumberland, East 
Main, Evarts, Hall, Harlan, Loyall, Rosenwald (Har- 
lan). 

M. C. Napier District — Buckhorn, Carr Creek, Dike 
Combs, Hazard, Leatherwood, Leslie County, M. C. 
Napier, Whitesburg. 

Elkhorn City District— Belfry, Elkhorn City, Feds 
Creek, Fleming Neon, John's Creek, Jenkins, Phelps, 
Pikeville, Virgie. 

MOREHEAD REGION 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, Cattletts- 
burg, Fairview, Holy Family, Louisa. 

South Portsmouth District — Greenup, McKell, Race- 
land, Russell, South Portsmouth, Wurtland. 

Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, Clark County, Du- 
Bois, Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling, Owingsville, 
Sharpsburg. 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, Carter, 
Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan County. 

Paintsville District — Blaine, Ezel, Inez, Meade 
Memorial, Morgan County, Oil Springs, Paintsville, 
Van Lear, Warfield. 

McDowell District — Auxier, McDowell, Martin, 
Prestonsburg, Wheelwright. 




IN MEMORIAM 
H. L. Perkins 

On Thursday evening, September 28th, 1961, a 
standing room crowd only attended a dinner honoring 
H. L. Perkins, Principal for thirty-two years at the 
Rineyville School, Hardin County. On Monday, Febru- 
ary 19th, 1962, in the school gymnasium, twelve hun- 
dred or more of his friends attended last rites for the 
great man of Rineyville, H. L. Perkins. Mr. Perkins 
was a loving father, a devoted husband, an educator, 
an administrator, a teacher, an athlete, and outstand- 
ing coach, a Sunday School teacher, and the best 
friend any boy or girl ever had. 

With sacrifice, with hard work, with vision, H. L. 
Perkins held both the Bachelor and Master's degrees 
from Western Kentucky State College. His transcript 
shows a major in math with all honor grades. 

When Gary Perkins, son of Clarence Perkins and 
grandson of H. L. Perkins, was a small boy, a sales- 
man came to the school and asked Gary where he 
might find Mr. Perkins. The small boy asked, "Do 
you mean my daddy or the man who owns the 
school?" It was H. L. Perkins whom the salesman 
wanted, and he never owned the school, but for 
thirty-two years, he served and cared for it as if it 
were his own. When asked on one occasion why he 
had never left Rineyville, he replied philosophically, 
"When you're out of place, you're not satisfied." And 
Mr. Perkins' "place" was the Rineyville School. For 
thirty-two years he guided the school with a firm, but 
gentle hand; his students loved and respected him, 
and he in turn was father to them all; he followed 
their good fortunes, and he helped them in time of 
need. The teachers whom he had supervised through- 
out the years returned to visit him in health, in sick- 
ness, and in death; no distance was too great, and no 
sacrifice too much, his former teachers were his 
friends forever. 

There was all through the years a kind of Will 
Rogers humor and homespun philosophy in H. L. 
Perkins. He spoke with brevity and sincerity; his 
speech was spiced with a rural flavor and inimitable 
wit. Ever a peacemaker in any sort of controversy, 
ever loyal to his students and friends, Mr. Perkins 
was a gentleman, a patriotic American, a good com- 
munity citizen and a Christian. No misdeed, no action 
unworthy of a teacher, unworthy of a father and hus- 
band, was ever attributed to Mr. Perkins. 

It is fitting that this tribute be published in the 
Kentucky High School Athlete. Mr. Perkins was an 
athlete and a great coach of basketball. In 1942, in 
1944, and in 1945, he coached teams which were in the 
"Sweet Sixteen." His full-time work as principal in 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



the last few years did not lessen his interest in the 
game and in the boys who played. Stored in his mem- 
ory were the records not only of every boy who had 
played in his school, but also the rerords of hundreds 
of players in the county, the region and the State. 
He could tell you their names, the number they wore, 
and the scores they made. No one appreciated or en- 
.I'oyed competition and good clean rivalry more than 
Mr. Perkins. In a full trophy case at the school, there 
is a bow tie which belonged at one time to his good 
friend, James T. Alton, Principal of the Vine Grove 
School and his prime rival through the years in bas- 
ketball. The tie was won by Mr. Perkins in 1954 when 
both men knew who would win the district tourna- 
ment — only Mr. Perkins knew! 

Perhaps no one will miss Mr. Perkins more than 
G. C. Burkhead, Superintendent of Hardin County 
Schools for twenty-eight of the thirty-two years of 
Mr. Perkins' stay at Rineyville. When Mr. Burkhead 
learned that Mr. Perkins' illness was without hope, 
he made this statement: "Not once during the twenty- 
eight years have I had cause to doubt the loyalty, the 
sincerity, and the worth of Mr. Perkins in the promo- 
tion of better schools for Hardin County. With never 
a selfish thought of personal gain or advancement, 
he stood ready and willing always to help me and the 
Board with our problems and to share in our success- 
es. I shall lose one of my best friends, both personal 
and professional." 

The pastor of Mr. Perkins' church in paying tribute 
spoke of Mr. Perkins' Christian influence and com- 
pared him to the Great Shepherd because of his hav- 
ing led hundreds of boys and girls. The little poem 
with which the pastor closed, and I have paraphrased, 
comforts you and me. 

'I tell you he has not died. 

He lives and breathes with you. 

He walks here at your side, 

He tells you things are true. 

I tell you he has not died. 

His hand clasps yours and mine. 

He is but glorified. 

He Lives. He Knows! He Sees! 

He shouts with every breath. 

All is eternal Life! There is no death!" 

— Grace Weller 



NEW BOARD MEMBERS 

(Continued From Page One) 
of Commerce of his community. 

For the past twelve years Mr. Dorsey has been 
secretary-treasurer of the Southern Kentucky Ath- 
letic Conference. He has been honored as "Man of 
the Year" by the Horse Cave Chamber of Commerce. 
This past summer he was commissioned a Kentucky 
Colonel in recognition of coaching the Caverna High 
State Titlist baseball team. 

Foster J. Sanders, son of a Methodist minister, 
was born in Summersville, Kentucky, in Green Coun- 
ty, on December 12, 1914. A graduate of the Beaver 
Dam High School, he received his A. B. degree from 
Kentucky Wesleyan College and his M. A. from the 
George Peabody College. 

From 1936 to 1941 Mr. Sanders coached and taught 
at the Shepherdsville High School. From 1941 to 1943 
he was a Safety Engineer for the Indiana Ordnance 
Works, and for the next two years he was Safety 
Director for the Gopher Ordnance Works at Minnea- 
polis, Minnesota. During 1945-46 Mr. Sanders was the 
Principal of the Shepherdsville High School, and dur- 
ing the period of 1946-55 he was a teacher of Social 
Studies at the Western Junior High School in Louis- 
ville. During the next six years he was Principal of 
the Westem Junior High School, and in 1961 he was 



named Principal of the Louisville Male High School. 

In 1936 Foster Sanders was listed in "Who's Who 
in Colleges and Universities". In 1955 he was awarded 
a Travel Fellowship by the Ford Foundation, but he 
declined this to accept the Principalship of the West- 
ern Junior High School. He is a member of the Ken- 
tucky Committee of the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools, Phi Delta Kappa 
National Educational Fraternity, the Masonic Lodge, 
and the Board of Trustees of the Cooper Memorial 
Methodist Church. 

Mr. Sanders is married to the former Jane Mc- 
Connell of Marion, Kentucky, a teacher at Fairdale 
Elementary School. They have two children, a daugh- 
ter, Barbara Sue, 20, a junior at Western Kentucky 
State College; and a son, Jerry, 17, a senior at South- 
ern High School. 



Dr. Dickey Speaks 

Dr. Prank G. Dickey, President of the University 
of Kentucky, was scheduled to speak at the dinner 
meeting of the Kentucky High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation. His subject was "What Is Right With Athletics 
In Kentucky." 

Prank Graves Dickey, fifth president of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, was born December 1, 1917, at 
Wagoner, Oklahoma. He is the son of Mrs. Katherine 
Bridges Dickey of Lexington and the late Joseph 
Stone Dickey, Jr. 

Dr. Dickey attended public schools in Wichita Falls, 
Texas, and in Lexington, Kentucky, graduating in 
1935 _ from Henry Clay High School of Lexington. 
President Dickey's undergraduate college education 
was completed at Transylvania College, Lexington, 
where he was graduated summa cum laude in June, 
1939. Dr. Dickey's undergraduate majors were English 
and history, with a minor in music. The University of 
Kentucky awarded Dr. Dickey the Master of Arts de- 
gree with a major in English in 1942 and the Doctor 
of Education degree in 1947. During a year's leave of 
absence from the University in 1952-53, Dr. Dickey did 
post-doctoral work at Harvard University with major 
emphasis in administration. 

President Dickey taught in the secondary schools 
of Fayette County, Kentucky, and in Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, from 1939 until 1943 when he entered the arm- 
ed forces. He served in the U. S. Army until 1946. 
Following his separation from the Army, Dr. Dickey 
served as graduate assistant in the IJniversity of 
Kentucky Bureau of School Sei-vice. After receiving 
his advanced degree in 1947. he remained on the facul- 
ty of the College of Education, and served successive- 
ly as instructor, assistant professor, associate pro- 
fessor, director of the Bureau of School Service, and 
finally as dean of the College of Education. He as- 
sumed the position of dean in 1949 and served in that 
capacity until he was named President of the Uni- 
vei-sity of Kentucky in June of 1956. On September 1, 
1956, he assumed the office of President, succeeding 
Dr. Herman Lee Donovan. 

Dr. Dickey has served as president of the Southei'n 
Association of Land Grant Colleges and State Uni- 
versities, president of the Southeastern Conference, 
president of the Southern Association of Public In- 
stitutions of Higher Education, president of the Ken- 
tucky Association for Supervision and Curriculum 
Development, and president of the Kentucky Assoc- 
iation for Student Teaching. He has served as a mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee of the National As- 
sociation of State LIniversities, a member of the 
Commission on Research and Service of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Southern 
Association, a member of the Commission on Inter- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



Page Five 



national Education of Phi Delta Kappa, a member of 
the Commission on Instruction and Evaluation of the 
American Council on Education, and a member of the 
Board of Curators of Transylvania College. 

Dr. Dickey has served in a number of civic posi- 
tions in his own community, having been president of 
the Lexington Kiwanis Club, a member of the Board 
of Directors of the United Fund, and state campaign 
chairman for both the Heart Fund and the Crippled 
Children's Society of Kentucky. Dr. Dickey and his 
family are active members of Woodland Christian 
Church, where he is a member of the Board of Elders. 



1962 Annual Meeting 

(Continued From Page One) 

larly scheduled basketball games during the season, 
and a school which does not maintain a football team 
shall not play more than twenty-four regularly 
scheduled basketball games. Schools may play in one 
county, conference, or invitational tournament. The 
games played by a member school in said tourna- 
ment shall not count against the number of I'egularly 
scheduled games. This rule shall become effective dur- 
ing the 1963-64 season. Any school which violates any 
of the above rules shall be suspended from the Assoc- 
iation for the duration of the season of the sport 
involved. 

PROPOSAL VI 

The Northern Kentucky Principals Association pro- 
poses that By-Law 27 be titled to read "Minimum 
Period for Football and Basketball Practice," and that 
the By-Law be rewritten to read as follows: 

"Footbball practice shall begin no sooner than 
twenty-one calendar days prior to the opening date 
of school. 

"No football game shall be played until the team 
has had at least three weeks of regular practice under 
the supervision and control of the coach. 

"Any player, to be eligible for the first game, shall 
have taken part in a minimum of ten practice periods 
during the three weeks preceding the first game. 

"Pre-season football scrimmage games against 
other schools shall be limited to two. No scrimmage of 
this type shall be held until after the first five days 
of practice. 

"Basketball practice shall begin no sooner than 
October 1 for a school not maintaining a football 
team and November 1 for a school which maintains a 
football team. 

"Basketball scrimmage games against other 
schools shall be limited to two. These games may be 
played prior to the first regularly scheduled game or 
during the Christmas holidays." 

PROPOSAL VII 

The Northern Kentucky Principals Association 
proposes that Sections 1 and 2 of By-Law 28 be re- 
written to read as follows: 

"Section 1 Definition of Seasons. 

"The football season shall begin on the opening 
date of school and end on December 1. The basketball 
season shall begin on October 1 for schools not main- 
taining a football team and November 1 for a school 
which maintains a football team, and shall end on the 
final day of the State Tournament. 

"Section 2 Out-of-Season Practice. 

"No football games or practices shall be held be- 
tween December 1 and 21 calendar days prior to the 
opening date of school. No basketball games or prac- 
tices shall be held between the final day of the State 
Tournament and October 1 for schools not maintain- 
ing a football team and November 1 for schools main- 
taining a football team. 



"Violation of these rules shall result in suspension 
from the K.H.S.A.A. in the sport involved." 
PROPOSAL VIII 

The Very Rev. Alfred W. Steinhauser, Principal 
(Trinity), proposes that By-Law 43 be amended by 
adding the following: "with the exception that, with 
the approval of the Commissioner, the Principal of an 
all-boys school may invite girl cheerleaders to repre- 
sent his school." 

PROPOSAL IX 

The Fourth District Secondary Principals Associa- 
tion proposes that Article IV, Section 2-a, of the Con- 
stitution be amended to provide that a future candi- 
date for membership on the Board of Control must 
be actively engaged as a secondary school principal 
in his local section. 

PROPOSAL X 

The Fourth District Secondary Principals Associa- 
tion proposes that Article IV, Section 2-b of the Con- 
stitution be amended to provide that each representa- 
tive and alternate to the Delegate Assembly shall be 
a secondary school principal. 

PROPOSAL XI 

Prin. R. L. Grider (Bryan Station) proposes that 
By-Law 28, Section 2, be amended to read as follows: 
"No organized practice in football and basketball 
shall be held earlier than the beginning of a four- 
calendar-week period immediately prior to the open- 
ing contest, and no organized practice shall be held 
during any school year subsequent to the end of the 
season as defined in Section 1. An organized practice 
shall be considered as any practice conducted pri- 
marily for the benefit of the candidates for an inter- 
scholastic team." 

PROPOSAL XII 

Prin. R. L. Grider (Bryan Station) proposes that 
By-Law 21 be amended to provide that not more than 
one football game shall be played on a day preceding 
a regular school day. vith the Commissioner having 
authority to waive this . -iouirement in hardship cases. 
PROPOS.J.L XIII 

Prin. Homer Jones (Dike Combs) proposes that 
Tournament Rule III, Section D, be amended to pro- 
vide that the site of the State Basketball Tournament 
shall be determined by a vote ut K.H.S.A.A. member 
school principals. 

PROPOSAL XIV 

Prin. Homer Jones (Dilce Combs) proposes that 
By-Law 21 be amended to provide that a K.H.S.A.A. 
member school basketball team be limited to a 
maximum of twenty-four games, including one invi- 
tational tournament, without taking into account 
whether or not the school maintains a football team. 



New Film 

A new film, World Series of 1961, has been placed 
on loan with the Film Library at the University 
of Kentucky. This film in color and sound shows the 
highlights of the five game series won by the New 
York Yankees over the Cincinnati Reds. The picture 
catches the fielding gems made by such great de- 
fensive players as the Yanks' Boyer and the Reds' 
Pinson and the powerful slugging of the best in 
the game today. Maris, Mantle and Blanchard of the 
Yankees, and Cincinnati's Coleman and Robinson. The 
fine pitching performances by Whitey Ford of the 
Yanks, who broke Babe Ruth's record for consecutive 
scoreless innings in World Series play, and by Joey 
Jay, who was the only pitcher to win for the Reds, 
are emphasized. 

The commentary for the film is done by Mel 
Allen. Close-ups of the stars of both teams and the 
offificers of both clubs and both leagues made interest- 
ing sidelights. 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

stand at attention, Kentuckians, and 
salute the "Game Guy of 1962." Howard 
Henidon, Jr., of Wingo, Kentucky, joins the 
unending- parade of Game Guys, which start- 
ed in 1949 when Bobby Kirchdorfer, now 
manager of the Brandenburg Country Club, 
won the honor. 

This 17-year-old lad is a junior at Wingo 
High School in Graves County. Today, his is 
"King of the Purchase" and "Mr. Courage." 
This handicapped youngster not only inspir- 
es others who are handicapped, but every- 
body else as well. 

Look at the record of this youngster, who 
is the victim of a birth defect, which result- 
ed in a severed nerve causing him to lose the 
use of his feet. His legs are fairly strong, 
but his feet turn under at the ankles causing 
him to walk on the sides rather that the bot- 
tom of his feet — but he has pitched and play- 
ed first base on the baseball team, as well as 
served as an umpire, (2) is an expert in first 
aid, (3) played elementary and junior high 
school basketball, (4) served as student man- 
ager of the Wingo High School Basketball 
team, (5) is an accomplished swimmer and 
ping pong player, besides being an outstand- 
ing junior basketball referee. 

Besides these athletic accomplishments, 
he is an "A" student. Small wonder that 800 
(eight hundred) coaches, principals, and of- 
ficials will stand at attention on the night of 
Thursday, April 5, 1962, when the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association's Annual 
Dinner is held at the Brown Hotel honoring 
Kentucky's "Game Guy of 1962." 

The officiating in the Kentucky State 
High School Basketball Tournament deserv- 
es the highest praise. Not only do the eight 
officials receive the commendation of The 
Flying Dutchman, but credit is also given the 
new system of using eight officials instead 
of five for the big classic. 

The story of Kentucky's Flying Dutch- 
man was publicized nationally by THIS 
WEEK Magazine on March 11, 1962. This 
has caused letters to come from all over the 
country asking about the Game Guys, Abou 
Ben Adhems, and the Corn Cob Pipe of Hon- 
or. From the White House came a letter from 
the President's Committee for Employment 
of the Physically Handicapped, asking for a 
complete story of the Game Guy Program. 
Mel Allen and the Voice of America made 
Flying Dutchman recordings for their usage. 

Kentucky is losing one of its outstanding. 




Howard Herndon, Jr. 

young officials. Al Gustafson, Jr. is retiring. 
Al did a great job and his influence will be 
long felt in High School sports. In the same 
breath. The Flying Dutchman doffs his hat 
to Lexington's "Scoop" Brown. For many 
years "Scoop" has been a close friend of The 
Dutchman. The Dutchman watched "Scoop" 
officiate in the Louisville Regional — let the 
record state that "Scoop" has ability, fair- 
ness, and courage. 

Herschel Roberts, personable Superin- 
tendent of Fort Knox High School, "wowed" 
the crowd at the South Central Officials As- 
sociation Dinner, where he was principal 
speaker. This gentleman has long deserved 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award ; so, Her- 
schel Roberts joins Congressman Oz Johnson 
as a Com Cob Pipe winner for the month of 
March. Kids owe a lot to Herschel and Oz. 
Representative Oz made his presence felt at 
Frankfort during this session of the Legis- 
lature. 

Tom Simmons and Jim Bazzell together 
sing the praises of Monticello High School 
for the outstanding courteous treatment ac- 
corded their team and their fans when Allen 
County High School played Monticello. The 
Abou Ben Adhem Award is now on display 
in this school. Jim Baker, Superintendent at 
Monticello, is a gentleman who teaches man- 
ners. Congratulations, Jim! 

A final note concerning Edd Kellow, 
Coach of Trinity High School. Edd has been 
appointed to the National Association of Bas- 
ketball Coaches Executive Committee. A 
f'ine honor for a fine gentleman. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 Page Nine 

1962 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Average Score: For Winner, 64.7; For Losers, 54.1; Total for both 118.8 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) ; 29.3 per game 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals: .86 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (Per. and T. for all games 611) Successful 63.7% 
Total No. Ending 1st Overtime 1 ; 2nd Overtime 2. 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No.: (a) Common fouls committed by player while he or a 

teammate was in control: 1.8 per game 

Average No.: (b) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 19.8 per game 

Average No.: (c) Times dribbler committed foul: 1.4 per game 

Average No.: (d) Personal fouls along free throw lane: By Team A per game 

By Team B per game 

Average No.: (e) Technical fouls on coach or bench personnel for 

unsportsmanlike conduct: per game 

Average No.: (f) Times irregularity noted and connected as provided 

by 10-7 Note: .13 per game 

Average No.: (g) Overall time from fii-st toss to final gun: 1 hour and 

12 minutes. 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

Average No. : (a) Times official handed ball to player for back court 

throw-in: 8.2 per game 

Average No.: (b) Violation of 3-second lane rule: .33 per game 

Average No.: (c) Violation by free thrower: .20 per game 

Average No.: (d) Violation by player of team A along free throw lane:__ per game 

Average No.: (e) Violation by player of team B along free throw lane: per game 

Average No.: (f) Times substitutions were made during game: 10.1 per game 

Average No.: (g) Times substitutes entered after a violation: 7.9 per game 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS — 1962 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the twelve officials who received the high- 
est ratings by coaches of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State High 
School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on eight Certified officials in the order of 
his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the coach receiving eight points, 
the second official seven points, etc. The schools given below are not listed in order by 
regions nor are they listed in the order of the tournament bracket. 



Official 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 



Roy Winchester 


8 


3 


6 


8 




7 






7 


4 


7 


5 






4 




54 


Bobby Flynn 






7 


5 


7 


3 




5 






6 




1 


3 


3 




40 


Milford Wells 




7 






6 




8 


4 




1 






4 




6 


4 


40 


Ken Arnold 


4 


1 


2 


7 




6 






4 




5 


6 








2 


37 


Nelson Allen 














3 


8 






3 


3 


7 


4 




7 


35 


Charlie Irwin 


7 


4 












2 


3 


6 


8 












30 


Foster "Sid" Meade 








1 






5 


7 










8 






8 


29 


Jack Wise 










8 


2 


6 






5 








5 




3 


29 


L. J. Coleman 






3 


6 




1 


7 
















8 




25 


Bill Harrell 






4 


2 


5 




4 






2 








8 






25 


Irv Spencer 


















1 


7 




7 






6 




21 


Jerry Kimmel 


5 


6 
















8 














19 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



Caneyville — Semi-Finalist 
1962 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Woody N:fl, Tommy Cummings, Jerry Tilford, David 
Smith, Phillip Woosley, Eddie Majors. Second R)\v: Ass't Coach Elnier McGhee, Bob Davis, 
Gilen Miller, Charles Strasburger, Scotty Willoughby, Ronald Green, Mgrs. Wendell Woosley and 
Glann Franks. 



MINUTES OF THE BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the K=ntuckv 
Hotel, Louisville, on Friday morning, March 16. 19P2. 
The meeting was called to order bv President W. H. 
Crowdus at 9:00, with all Board members and Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford present. 

K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the readirg of the .January 20th meeting be 
waived, since the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

The Commissioner reported the results of the 
recent balloting for Board membership in Section 3 
and 4 as follows: Section 3 — Ralph C. Dorsey 42, 
Herschel J. Roberts 13; Section 4 — Foster J. Sanders 
22, Richard Greenwell 17. 

There was a discussion of new proposals to be 
presented by the Board of Control to the fourthcom- 
ing Delegate Assembly. The Policy Committee rec- 
ommended the following proposals: 

PROPOSAL I— The Board of Control proposes that 
"twenty" and twe.cty-four" be substituted for "twenty- 
four and "thirty" respectively in the second sentence 
of By-Law 21, and that the last sentence of the By- 
Law be amended to read as follows: "In one cou.'ty, 
conference, or invitational tournament the games 
played shall not be counted against the game limit. 
This change, if adopted, is r.ot to take effect until 
the beginning of the 1963-64 school year. 

PROPOSAL II— The Board of Control proposes 
that the following sentence be added to By-Law 21: 
"Exclusive of tournament games, no more than six 
basketball games shall be played on nights preceding- 
school days." This change, if adopted, is not to take 
effect until the beginning of the 1963-64 school year. 



PROPOSAL III— The Board of Control proposes 
that another paragraph be added to By-Law 21, re- 
ferring to football games, to read as follows: "Ex- 
clusive of conference and state playoffs, no more than 
ten football games may be played by a team repre- 
senting a member school during the regular season. 
Any scrimmage or practice game in which players 
from another school take part shall be counted against 
this game limit." This change, if adopted, is not to 
take effect until the beginning of the 1963-64 school 
year. 

PROPOSAL IV— The Board of Control proposes 
a new By-Law to read as follows: "All football games 
to be played during any season shall be scheduled on 
or before September 1 of that season. The Commission- 
er shall have authority to extend this deadline in 
hardship cases." 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Jack Dawson 
that the proposals as recommended by the Policy 
Committee be considered as Board of Control pro- 
posals. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read some correspondence which 
he had received from Prin. W. H. Conley of the Oil 
Springs High School and from registered basketball 
official Bob Hurley concerning whether or not the 
Oil Springs High School owed the official his fee for 
a game scheduled to be played on February 3, 1962, 
but which the official did not work because of a mix- 
up in assignments. Jack Dawson moved, seconded by 
Robert P. Forsythe, that Prin. Conley be directed to 
pay official Bob Hurley his regular fee unless it 
could be established to the satisfaction of the Board 
that the fee was not due. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that all bills of the Association beginning January 20, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



Page Eleven 



1962, and ending March 15, 1962, bs approved. The 
motion vi^as carried unanimously. 



There being no further busir.ess, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



Early Season Baseball Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations of some of the early 
season situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Rl is on 2nd and R2 on 1st when B3 hits 
a home run inside the field. R2 fails to touch 2nd and 
appeal is made. The hit occurred wrhen: (a) one was 
out; or (b) two were out. 

Ruling: In (a), R2 is out. Both Rl and B3 score 
runs. In (b), no run scores since R2 is the third out 
by a force play. 

2. Play: With two out, Rl is on 3rd and R2 on 1st. 
Bo hits safely. Rl reaches home, after which R2 is 
tagged when he overslides 2nd. 

Ruling: Run by Rl scores. The force ended when 
R2 touched 2nd. 

3. Play: With one out, Rl is on 3rd and R2 on 1st. 
B4 hits fly which is caught. Rl tags up and advances 
to home. After Rl has touched home base, ball is 
thrown to 1st, where R2 is declared out for not tagging 
up after the catch. 

Ruling: The run by Rl counts. Throwing ball to 
1st constitutes an appeal. It is not a force-out and, 
therefore, the ran counts. 

4. Play: Rl, R2, and R3 on 3rd, 2nd and 1st bases, 
respectively, with one out. B5 hits to P6, who throws 
home. Ball caroms off catcher's mitt and lodges be- 
hind umpire's protector. Ball cannot be recovered until 
Rl, R2, R3 and B5 have crossed home plate. 

Ruling: Umpire should declare ball dead and award 
two bases to each runner, including batter-runner B5. 
Rl and R2 score, R3 is awarded 3rd base, and B5 is 
awarded 2nd base. 

5. Play: Rl, R2 and R3 are on 3rd, 2nd and 1st 
bases, respectively, with one out. B5 hits to F6, who 
throws home. Ball caroms off catcher's mitt and 
lodges behind imipire's protector. Each ninner has 
advanced one base when ball drops to ground. 

'Rioling: If umpire has not already declared ball 
dead it remains in play and run by Rl counts. If he 
declared ball dead as soon as it lodged behind his 
protector, the ruling in Play 4 above would apply. 

6 Play: Rl and R2 are on 3rd and 2nd bases, re- 
spectively, with one out. The count on B4 is ball three, 
strike two. Rl attempts to steal home and pitch strikes 
him while in strike zone. B4 does not swing at pitch. 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead immediately. B4 is out 
and Rl and R2 are each advanced one base from where 
they were at time of pitch. 

7. Play: Bl hits pop foul beyond 1st base which 
F3 loses in the sun. Ball falls on foul ground about 
15 feet beyond Isrt without being touched by any fielder 
and reverse spins to roll onto fair ground between 1st 
and home bases. Bl reaches 2nd base. 

Ruling: When ball first touches foul gi-ound beyond 
1st base it becomes a foul ball. 

8. Play: Bl hits safely but misses 1st base on way 
to 2nd. After he passes 2nd, F8 throws the ball toward 
3rd base and it bounces into stands. Umpire awards 
Bl home base. May Bl be called out on appeal for 
missing 1st base? 

Ruling: Yes. He missed 1st base during a live 
ball and ,since it was not one of the bases awarded, 
after the ball again becomes alive an appeal may be 
made at 1st base. Bl would be declared out and his 



run cancelled. If 1st base had been one of the awarded 
bases (if Bl had not reached 1st base by time throw 
left the fielder's hand), the appeal would be ignored. 

9. Play: The umpire repeatedly places his right 
hand on the catcher's side or back while crouching 
behind him. 

Ruling: At no time during the game is it considered 
proper for an umpire to purposely touch a player. An 
umpire who does so is not using good mechanics. 
Such procedure, when the catcher is fielding, could 
be construed as umpire interference. This action by an 
umpire is undesirable and should be called to the 
attention of the umpire's state association so that it 
may direct the official to correct this faulty habit. 

10. Play: With Rl on 1st, Fl goes into his "stretch." 
Before Fl has come to a "momentary stop" with both 
hands on the ball in front of his body, Rl breaks for 
2nd base. Fl whirls, steps toward 2nd base and throws 
ball there without first coming to his "stop" and then 
stepping back off the pitcher's plate. Is this legal ? 

Ruling: Yes, because the pitcher is attempting to 
put out Rl, who is advancing toward 2nd base. 

11. Play: Rl, R2 and R3 are on 3rd, 2nd and 1st, 
respectively, with two out and improper batter B7 is 
at bat. On first pitch to B7, Rl steals home safely. 
Fl then commits a balk, advancing R2 and R3 to 3rd 
and 2nd. Fl then delivers a wild pitch and both R2 
and R3 score. B7 hits the next pitch for a home run. 
B6 then appears at bat. Team in field calls error to 
umpire's attention before first pitch is made to B6. 

Ruling: B6 is called out for failing to bat in proper 
turn. B7 is declared next proper batter in next 
inning. All three runs are counted since they are not 
the result of any act by improper batter B7. However, 
B7's home run is cancelled. 

12. Play: 'Rl is on 2nd base, with one out, and the 
count is three and two on improper batter B4. B4 
swings at and misses next pitch, which eludes F2, 
who retrieves ball and throws B4 out at 1st. On the 
play Rl advances to 3rd. Team in field appeals that 
B4 batted out of turn and that Rl should be returned 
to 2nd. 

Ruling: Umpire should declare B3 out and order Rl 
back to 2nd. B4 is the next proper batter. 

13. Play: Is the black border surrounding the per- 
imeter of home plate a part of the strike zone width ? 

Ruling: No. The border is there to make the white 
area stand out by contrast and it also is beveled so 
that players, when sliding into home base, will not 
injure themselves on what would othei-wise be a shaii) 
comer of the plate. The width of the strike zone is 
17 inches. 

14. Play: All bases are occupied vnth two out. The 
count on B6 is three and two. On the next pitch, a 
squeeze play is attempted but F2 steps forward and 
catches the ball before it crosses plate and tags Rl, 
sliding toward home. 

Ruling: This is ruled catcher interference. Ball is 
declared dead. All runners are advanced one base from 
where they were at the time of pitch and B6 is put 
on 1st. 

15. Play: Batter-runner runs outside the 3-foot 
lines (last 45 feet from home to 1st base) and this 
act causes catcher's throw: (a) to hit him (batter- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1962 



runner); or (b) to be dropped or missed by 1st base- 
man; or (c) to bounce from batter-runner's back into 
stands. 

Ruling: In situation (a), (b) and (c), umpire de- 
clares the ball dead as soon as intei-ference is com- 
mitted by the batter-runner, who is declared out. Each 
base runner must return to the base he occupied at 
time of pitch. In (c), because the interference by the 
batter-runner caused the ball to go into the stands, 
no awards are made. 

Comment: Running out of the 3-foot lane is ignored 
unless such act interferes with a fielder or a fielder's 
throw. 

16. Play: Rl and R2 are on 3rd and 1st bases, re- 
spectively, with one out. B4 bunts and interfers with 
Fl, who is trying to field the bunt on baseline. 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead immediately at time of 
interference. B4 is declared out. Rl and R2 must re- 
turn to 3rd and 1st bases, respectively, where they 
were at time of pitch. 

17. Play: Bl hits triple. Umpire calls time to in- 
spect ball, which hit wall in outfield. Umpire then 
calls "Play ball" and Fl get on pitcher's plate and 
takes set position. From there he throws to 1st base 
to appeal that Bl missed 1st. Umpire rules that Bl 
did touch 1st. Is this a balk? 

Ruling: No. The pitcher may throw to an occupied 
base to make an appeal on an infraction. To be abso- 
lutely safe against committing a balk in executing this 
maneuver, it would be preferable for Fl to become 
an infielder by moving his pivot backward from 
pitcher's plate. 

18. Play: Rl is on 3rd. F2 returns the ball to Fl 
but overthrows. Base umpire picks up ball and hands 
or tosses it to Fl. Is Rl awarded home? 

Ruling: No. Ball became dead as soon as umpire 
touched it. This is ruled as umpire interference. Even 
though Rl is advancing toward home at the time the 
umpire picks up the ball, Rl is required to return to 
3rd base. 

19. Play: Optional reentry modification is not being 
used. In the top half of an inning SI bats for B3, who 
is the rightfielder of team at bat. In bottom half of 
the inning B3 erroneously returns to his position in 
right field when his team takes the field. The error 
is not discovered until he makes a spectacular catch 
then the coach of the opposing team protests that 
fielder is an illegal player. 

Ruling: As soon as the error is discovered, umpire 
shall remove fielder, who illegally returned to the 
game. The catch and all intervening plays and action 
between time player illegally reentered the game 
and his removal from it are not nullified. Had the 
optional reentry rule provision been in effect, B3's 
reentry would have been legal. 

20. Play: Rl is on 2nd base with one out and count 
on B3 is ball one. On next pitch Rl attempts to steal 
3rd base. Pitch is inside, causing right-handed batter 
B3 to back away and step outside the batter's box. 
F2 shifts inside to receive pitch and attempts throw 
to F5 at 3rd. The thi-ow hits the bat while it is being- 
held by B3. B3 did not have time to avoid throw by 
F2. 

Ruling: Ball is in play. The batter did not commit 
batter interference. 

Comment: If B3 had stood in the batter's box and 
permitted pitch to strike him he would not have been 
granted 1st base. He was forced to step out of batter's 
box to avoid being struck by the inside pitch and it 
was F2's throwing error which caused the ball to 
strike the bat. 



" 21. Play: Rl and R2 are on 2nd and 1st, respective- 
ly, with B3 at bat. B3 hits to F6, who tosses to F4, 
retiring R2. F4 throws toward F3 in an attempted 
double play but throw is wild and F3 throws his glove 
at ball: (a) before; or (b) after B3 reaches 1st. In 
either case, glove strikes ball. 

Ruling: In (a), Rl is awarded home base and B3 
is awarded 2nd base. In (b), Rl is awarded home base 
and B3 is awarded 3rd base. 

22. Play: A special ground rule provides "If a 
fair ball is hit over short right field on a fly, it is an 
automatic 2-base hit." Bl hits a fair ball which will 
obviously go over right field fence on the fly. F9 tosses 
his glove at ithe ball while it is over the field of play. 
The glove strikes the ball and: (a) the ball continues 
over the fence; or (b) the ball falls to ground in the 
outfield. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b), Bl is given credit 
for a double and is awarded 2nd base because of the 
special ground rule. In a game without the ground 
rule, Bl would be awarded a home run. 

23. Play: Rl is on 3rd and R2 on 1st with 2 out. 
Fl balks but then delivers and B5 hits safely. Rl 
crosses home but R2, in advancing to 3rd, misses 2nd 
base. An appeal is made at 2nd. Does run scored by 
Rl count? 

Ruling: R2 is out on appeal at 2nd base and, 
since this is the 3rd out and a force play, Rl does not 
score. 

24. Play: With 2 out and Rl and R2 on 3rd and 
1st bases, respectively, Fl commits a balk but delivers. 
B5 hits the pitch safely for two bases but fails to 
touch 1st. Rl has crossed home and R2 reaches 3rd 
base. ."Vn appeal is made at 1st base. Does run scored 
by Rl count? 

Ruling: B5 is out on appeal at 1st base and, 
since this is the 3rd out on the batter-runner before 
he touched 1st, Rl does not score. 

25. Play: Rl is on 1st base with none out. B2 
hits ground ball to F6. F6 fumbles the ball Rl rounds 
2nd base and continues toward 3rd. F6 attempts to 
throw ball to F5 but his throw goes into the stand. 

Ruling: Rl is awarded 3rd base. 

26. Play: With Rl advancing to 2nd, a pitch goes 
directly from the bat of B2 to catcher's mask or pro- 
tector and rebounds into his mitt. Is this a catch and 
may Rl advance to 2nd? 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead when it strikes pro- 
tector. Hence, it is neither a catch nor a foul tip and 
Rl must return to 1st base. 

27. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, B3 hits 
a ground ball toward F6. To prevent a double play, 
Rl fields batted ball and holds it or tosses it directly 
to the ground or to a player. May two be declared 
out? If so, which two? 

Ruling: For such act Rl is out and umpire should 
also declare the batter-runner (B3) out if it is 
obvious that the interference by Rl prevented a double 
play at 1st base. The National Alliance Code does not 
provide for putting out a second runner other than 
the batter-runner because of the difficulty in judging 
the status of runners, other than the one who inter- 
feres, and the batter-runner. 

28. Play: Does a quick pitch or other illegal 
pitch always result in a ball being called? 

Ruling: Not always. If there is a runner, it is 
a balk and no ball is called. Also, with no runner on 
base, if pitch should strike the batter no ball is called 
and batter is awarded 1st base. 

29. Play: Batted ball strikes home plate or in 
the batter's box and bounces to fair ground. 

Ruling: Unless it touches batter, catcher or um- 
pire while over foul ground, it is a fair ball. 



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Basketballs — 




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78 Super K — Another popular item : a practice ball of excellent quality. Each 

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t 5.80 

j 4.30 


Basketball Goals — 




2660 — Official for any — high school gym or playground. Pair, complete with nets-__ 
3.38 H — Outdoor practice goal. Equally satisfactory for indoor use. Pair with nets- 


$ 8.00 

$ 2-95 


Horse Shoes — 




No.HS — Regulation size and weight; Craftsman brand; drop forged. Pair 


J 2.10 


No. P — Regulation pitching stakes for playing horse shoes. Price per pair 


$ 2.25 


Shuffleboard Sets — 




No. 950 — A quality set of 4 jointed aluminum cues and 8 bakelite discs. Prcie 


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894— Official set with 8 wooden di.scs and four wood cues. Set 


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Volleyballs — 

Seamless No. 582 — Molded type especially for outdoor play. Price 


$ 9.15 


No. LV 4 — Voit outdoor basketball. Price _-- _ _- — _ _ _ 


; 5.00 


No. 2712-T— Volley Ball net. Price 


$ 5.40 


Rubber Playground Balls — 




No. 405— Extra Heavy— 10" diameter when inflated; rubber inflation valve. Each 

No.404 — SVi" diameter. Each 


J 2.95 

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No. 405 — Same as above; 6" diameter. Each 


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Badminton Sets — 




No. 16 — 4 imported rackets; 1 pr. posts with guy ropes; 1 net, 3 birds and rules 


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Soft Balls and Bats — 




No. N 12 — Sutcliffe official night ball; special white cover. 

Recommended for tournament plav 


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No. 51 H— Softball Bat— made by "Louisville Slugger" factory; 

brown finish hickory; black tape grip 


i 1.50 

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All Prices Quoted are Special School Prices 




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UTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



Many Thanks To Yon 



MANY THANKS to our many friends and customers who made our room 
their headquarters while in Louisville for the 1962 State High School 
Basketball Tournament and for the K. E. A. Convention. 
It was nice to have you and we appreciate the nice business that you plac- 
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HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




High School Athlete 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION-- 1962 



r 




Left to Right) Front Row: Dave Kremer, G 
wing, Steve Merrifield, Dick Ward, Max Collins 
buch. Tommy Godfrey, Paul Clephas, Mike Gran 
son. Third Row: Alan AVilkinson, Larry Profum 
Fourth Row: Bill Lancaster, Cooper Buschemeye 
John Parsons, Tom Diebold, Glenn Hubbuch, Bo 
Row: Bob Lynch, Louie Lococo, Mike Koch, Scot 
Falvey, Greg Meiman, Bruce Breitmeyer. 



ary Bray, Jimmy Wood, Ray Wilkins, Fred Ger- 
, Dave Bowen. Second Row: Bob Ganoe Don Hub- 
inger, Steve Taylor, Danny Glaser, Billy Symp- 
0, Tim Kute, Al Horton, Mike Parks, Tom Aubrey, 
r. Randy French, Ted Wathen, Tony Ambrose, 
b Sehlinger, Mike Harpring, Ed Aubrey. Fifth 
t Prescott, Tom Finnegan, Bill Ackerman, John 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 1962 




COVINGTON CATHOLIC H. S. SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "B" CHAMPION— 1962 




(Left to Right) Front How: Jim Corl>ett, Steve Rettig, Dave Perez, Roger Roeding, Fred 
Hellman, Steve Hellmann, Jim Rieskamp, Bob Wartman, Dan Day. Second Row: Tom Grayson, 
Joe Corbett, Tom O'Comior, Glenn Graham, Bob Blank, Jeff Cobb, Tom Runge, Jack Grayson, 
Dick Hoppenjans, Gerry Suetholz, Mike Fox. Third Row: Mike Reusch, Rev. John McDermott, 
Coach; Jim McDermott, Jack Payne. 



1961-62 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Four hundred twenty-six schools joined the Assoc- 
iation during- 1961-62. This is eight less than were en- 
rolled in 1960-61. One hundred fifty-three schools had 
eleven-man football teams, and thirteen played eight- 
man football. This is an increase of five eleven-man 
teams over 1960-61. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional 
basketball tournament managers show total receipts 
of $149,010.40. Receipts from the sixty-four district 
basketball toumaments amounted to $237,327.25. Re- 
ceipts from ticket sales at the State Basketball 
Tournament, including state tax, will approximate 
$144,000.00. Profit to the Association on the tour&a- 
ment will be close to $104,000.00. A complete record of 
all receipts and disbursements will appear in a sub- 
sequent issue of the Association magazine. 

Thirteen hundred basketball officials and 461 
football officials registered with the Association in 
1961-62. Nine football rules clinics were held under the 
direction of Edgar McNabb, and forty-nine football 
officials took the National Federation examination 
for the higher ratings. Of this rumber, five were 
added to the "certified" list, and twenty-six to the 
"approved" list. Charlie Vettiser, veteran trainer of 
officials, conducted fifteen basketball clinics, and held 
the School for Basketball Officials. Additional meet- 
ings and clinics were held by the regional representa- 
tives who continue to render a fine service to the 
officials and schools in their respective areas. Sixty- 
seven officials took the National Federation basket- 
ball examination with twenty-one being added to the 
"certified" list and thirty-one receivng the "approved" 
rating. 



To date no member school of the Association has 
been suspended during the current school year. Six 
schools were placed on probation for comparatively 
short periods of time for possible violation of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Sportsmanship Rule. 

The fall of 1961 saw the third season of the foot- 
ball class championships. These have now become well 
established and have definitely caused a revived inter- 
est in high school football in Kentucky. The Board of 
Control upon request set up districts in one region 
during 1961, and will set up districts for two more 
regions in 1962. It is probable that by 1963 all regions 
in Classes A and AA will be divided into districts. 

Interest in minor and spring sports continues to 
increase. Seven regional cross country runs were held 
on October 28 for the purpose of qualifying teams and 
individuals for the state event, which was held in 
Lexing-ton on November 11. Seven schools sent entries 
to the Class A Section of the State Swimming Meet, 
held in Lexington on Februai-y 24. Ten schools sent 
entries to the Class B Section of the State Swimming 
Meet, held in Lexington on March 31. In conjunction 
with this meet the Association held its first State 
Swimming Meet for Girls. Seven schools sent entries 
to this meet. 

Two hundi-ed twenty schools have indicated that 
they will send teams to the twelve regional track 
meets. This is by far the largest number of track 
schools in the history of the Association. Fifty dis- 
trict tournaments have been set up for baseball, to 
accommodate the 325 teams which will enter the 
tournaments. The number of baseball teams each 
year now appears to have leveled off. There will be 
105 schools with golf teams, seventy-three with boys' 
(Continued on Page Six) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXIV— NO. 10 



MAY, 1962 



1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The Forty-fifth annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 
on Thursday afternoon, April 5, 1962. 

President W. H. Crowdus called the meet- 
ing to order at 3:00, and asked the Commis- 
sioner to call the roll of delegates. Fifty- 
three regularly elected delegates or alter- 
nates answered the roll call. The following 
delegates were seated in the absence of their 
delegate or alternate from their respective 
districts: Rayborne Pickering, D. 5; J. D. 
Rayburn, D. 9 ; Charles Harris, D. 18 ; Larry 
McDonald, D. 20; Harry Hardin, D. 27; Jerry 
Brown, D. 48; James A Pursifull, D. 51. The 
motion to seat these delegates was made by 
Russell Williamson, seconded by Woodrow 
Crum, and carried unanimously. 

W. W. Chumbler moved, seconded by John 
Robinson, that the minutes of the 1961 an- 
nual meeting of the Association, which had 
been sent previously to all member schools, 
be approved without being read. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a re- 
port on the activities of the Association dur- 
ing the 1961-62 school year (The report of 
the Commissioner appears elsewhere in this 
issue of the magazine). 

President Crowdus introduced to the 
Delegate Assembly Ralph C. Dorsey and 
Foster J. Sanders, recently elected to the 
Board of Control for a period of four years 
beginning July 1, 1962, and representing 
Sections 3 and 4 respectively. 

President Crowdus stated that considera- 
tion of proposals was the next order of bus- 
iness. 

Tom Gabbard moved, seconded by W^. W. 
Chumbler, that Proposal I, providing that 
"twenty" and "twenty-four" be substituted 
for "twenty-four" and "thirty" respectively 
in the second sentence of By-Law 21, be 
adopted. The vote was 33-28 in favor of the 
proposal, but this was not the necessary 
two-thirds vote required for amending the 
By-Law and the motion was declared lost. 



W. W. Chumbler moved, seconded by 
John Robinson, that Proposal II, calling for 
an amendment to By-Law 21 to provide that 
no more than six basketball games exclusive 
of tournament games shall be played on 
nights preceding school days, be adopted. 
The motion failed to carry. 

John Robinson moved, seconded by W. W. 
Chumbler, that Proposal HI, limiting the 
number of football games to ten in any sea- 
son, be adopted. The motion failed to carry. 

H. R. Bowling moved, seconded by Wil- 
liam B. Reed, that Proposal IV, providing 
that all football games to be played during 
any season shall be scheduled on or before 
September 1 of that season, be adopted. On 
a voice vote President Crowdus declared 
the motion carried. 

Donald Davis moved that Proposal V, 
limiting the number of football and basket- 
ball games by amending and re-writing By- 
Law 21, be adopted. There was no second to 
the motion, and it was therefore not con- 
sidered. 

W. W. Chumbler moved, seconded by 
John Robinson, that Proposal VL providing 
that football and basketball practice be limit- 
ed by re-writing the provisions of By Law 27, 
be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Woodrow Crum moved, seconded by John 
Robinson, that Proposal VH, making certain 
changes in the definition of the basketball 
season, and limiting out-of-season practice 
in football and basketball, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

John Pace moved, seconded by Arthur 
Walsh, that Proposal VIII, providing that 
the Principal of an all-boys school may in- 
vite girl cheerleaders to represent his school, 
be adopted. The vote was 39-22 in favor of 
the proposal, but this was not the necessary 
two-thirds vote required for amending ihe 
By-Law, and the motion was declared lost. 

Tom Gabbard moved, seconded by John 

Pace, that Proposal IX, providing that 

Article IV, Section 2-a, of the Constitution 

be amended to provide that a future candid- 

( Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



May, 1962 VOL.XXIV— NO. 10 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO A. SANFORD 

A»iBtant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President W. H. Crowdus (1968-62). Franklin 

Vice-President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Directors — Jack Dawson (1968-62), Louisville: Robert P. For- 
sythe (1959-63). Greenville: Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville: Oran C. Teater (1960- 
64), PainUville: Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jiom the Commissioned s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1961-62 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility). 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials. 

3. Official's Report on Schools — 
Basketball. 



State Track Committee 

The State High School Track Meet, 
sche(3Lile(3 to be held in Lexington on May 
18-19, will be managed by Ath. Dir. John 
Heber of the Henry Clay High School. Other 
members of the committee are : Preston Hol- 
land, Murray; George Claiborne, Owensboro; 
Elvis Donaldson, Bowling Green; Scott 
Smith, Fort Knox ; Emmett Goranflo, Middle- 
town; Wayne Cooper, Louisville; John 
Schaar, Bellevue; Alex Stevens, Danville; 
Herb Tye, Barbourville ; Arthur Mullins, Elk- 
horn City; Ernie Chattin, Ashland. These 
regional managers will assist Mr. Heber in 
conducting the State Meet. 

Golf Tournaments 

The eight regional golf tournaments, the 
sites of which were given in the March issue 
of the ATHLETE, will be managed by the 
following men: Ath. Dir. Fred Clayton, Cald- 
well County High School; Ath. Dir. Elvis 
Donaldson, Bowling Green High School ; "Oz" 
Johnson, Valley High School; William Bark- 
ley, Lafayette High School ; Julian Pitzer, 
Micidlesboro High School; Walter Baulch, 
Holmes High School; Fred Allen, Athei'ton 
High School; Prin. Paul Trimble, Paintsville 
High School. The State Golf Tournament will 
be held at Fort Knox on May 22-23, and will 
be managed by Coach John Hackett of the 
Fort Knox High School. Principals who have 
not received their entity blanks should write 
to their respective managers for these forms. 



Tennis Tournaments 

There are seven regional tournaments for 
boys being held in tennis this year. There 
are two tournaments for the Louisville and 
Jefferson County schools, both managed by 
Emmett Goranflo of the Eastern High 
School. The other tournaments are being 
managed by Coach Ted Hornback, Bowling 
Green ; Scott Smith, Fort Knox ; Roger Klein, 
Bellevue; Ath. Dir. Charles T. Hughes, Rich- 
mond ; Gene Huff, Lexington. The State 
Tennis Tournament will be held in Louisville 
on May 14-15, and will be managed by Mr. 
Goranflo. 

By the time this issue of the ATHLETE 
comes from the press, seven regional tennis 
tournaments for girls will have been con- 
ducted. These tournaments were scheduled 
to be managed by Mrs. Tom Rowlett, Mur- 
ray ; Miss Betty Langley, Bowling Green ; 
Miss Margaret Sheegog, Louisville ; Roger 
Klein, Bellevue ; Charles T. Hughes, Rich- 
mond ; Mrs. Ann Sandusky, Middletown ; 
Gene Huff, Lexington. The State Tennis 
Tournament for Girls will be held at Louis- 
ville on May 11-12. This tournament will 
be managed by Miss Margaret Sheegog, du- 
Pont Manual High School, Louisville. 
Attention, Principals! 

More than 200 principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools have not as yet filed requests 
this school year for their insurance subsidies. 
If the school is underwriting all or part of 
insurance protection for its athletes, the 
Board of Control will allow a maximum cred- 
it or refund of $30.00 to each school for "all 
sports except football," and an additional 
credit or refund of $30.00 to each school 
maintaining a football team. Principals of 
schools which qualify for the credit or re- 
fund should write for reimbursement forms 
at once. 

Fines for Late Reports 

More than 120 member schools had not 
filed their reports on basketball officials and 
their basketball participation (eligibility) 
lists for the 1961-62 season when this issue 
of the ATHLETE went to press. Some 700 
basketball officials have not filed their re- 
ports on member schools. The Board of Con- 
trol has established a fine of $5.00 for both 
schools and officials deliquent with their re- 
ports. A deadline of June 15 has been set 
for the filing of all reports required under 
association rules. Officials who have not 
worked any games schould notify the K.H.S. 
A.A. office accordingly. Such notification is 
considered a report. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Page Three 



1962 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, February 24, 1962 
TEAM SCORING — Class "A" 



TEAM 



a) 



o ju 

[X4 






o "^ 

O '-I 
(Mfe 






C3 ^ 



>.y 






St. Xavier 

Lafayette 

Waggener ._. 

Atherton 

Bryan Station 

Seneca 

Trinity 



7 


11 


5 


15 


3 


8 





9 


7 


4 


7 


1 


7 





5 





7 


7 


5 


2 


4 


1 


5 


2 


2 





1 




















2 





4 


1 


















J 14 

6 

10 



CLASS "A" 
Results 

1. 400 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1; Oldham (A), 5:38.8; 

Lawrence (Wl, 5:48.6: Hollinsworth (BS), 
6:29.8; Harvey (BS), 6:46.3. 

Heat No. 2: Tuton (W), 5:10.9; Bayhi 
(L), 5:29.7. Fuller (X), 5:29.7; Kremer 
(Xl, 5:47.0; Sympson (X), 5:48.0. 

Heat No. 3: Benn (A), 4:37.2: McGill 
(T), 4:50.5; Sturgeon (A), 4:52.8; Eueff 
(T), 5:09.4; Moter (S), 5:11.9. 

Heat No. 4: Kute (X), 4:31.2; Farm- 
er (L), 4:36.0; Terry (Al, 4:39.5; Geiser 
(W). 4:44.5; Hammonds (L). 4:44.9; 
Clephas (X), 6:06.5. 

Finals 

Kute, St. Xavier 4:31.2 

Farmer, Lafayette 4:36.0 

Benn. Atherton 4:37.2 

Terry. Atherton 4:39.5 

Geiser, Waggener 4:44.5 

Hammonds. Lafayette 4:44.9 

Kute set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 4:31.2. 

2. 50 — Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Upton (A), :34.6 ; Lage 
(T), :28.3; Dabney (BS), :24.3 : Hartye 
(T), :26.9; Speevak (A), :27.8 ; Hargett 
(L), :35.0. 

Heat No. 2: Pratt (BS), :36.3 ; Brooks 
(A), :26.7; Cooke (L), :26.6 ; Aubrey (XI, 
:26.4: Asman (T), :28.6 ; King (W), :29.3. 

Heat No. 3: Cooper (L), :29.2 ; Mei- 
man (Xl, :26.7 ; Schoening (W), :24.9 : 
Murphy (L), :26.9 ; Coblin (S). :29.3 ; 
Thompson (W), :30.1. 

Heat No. 4 Kern (W), :26.4 ; Stevens 
(S), :26.3; Hubbuch (XI, :25.1 ; Bray (Xl, 
:25.9; Eakin (Si, :28.8 ; Thompson (T), 
:31.6. 

Finals 



3. 100 Yard Butterfly- 
Heat No. 1: Ackerman (X), 1: 

Horton (Xl, 1:06.8; Wright (T|, 1: 

Lococo (X), 1:17.4. 

Heat No. 2: Rivers (A), 1:02.8; ( 

win IT), 1:09.0; Kozlove (S), 1: 

Mitchel (W), 1:16.4: Paris (T), 1: 

Holliday (L), 1 :25.0. 

Heat No. 3: Abbott (W), :59.6 ; 

(BS), 1:09.0: Godfrey (X), 1:10.5; . 

son (A), 1:15.4; Clark (W), 1:15.7. 
Finals 

1. Abbott, Waggener 

2. Rivers, Atherton 1 



Dabney, Bryan Station 
Hubbuch, St. Xavier _- 
Schoening, Waggener _ 

Bray, St. Xavier 

Hartye, Trinity 

Stevens, Seneca 



:24.4 
:24.7 
:25.0 



an, St. Xavier 

Horton, St. Xavier 

Hart, Bryan Station 

Goodwin, St. Xavier 

Abbott set a new state record 
!nt with his time of :58.6. 



4. 290 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Clephas (X), 2:12.8; 
Parsons (Xl. 2:16.4; Bayhi (L), 2:29.6, 
Hancock (Tl, 2:52.0; Hollinsworth (BS), 
3:00.9. 

Heat No. 2: Dorton (W), 2:17.1; Wil- 
son (BSl, 2:27.1; Sympson (X|. 2:37.8; 
Campbell (BS), 2:50.4; Bohne (T), 2:54.2. 

Heat No. 3: Hammonds (L), 2:10.7; 
Benner (S). 2:21.5; Nollenberger (L), 
2:21.9; Hansen (A), 2:28.8; Shell (W), 
2:45.8. 

Heat No. 4: Kute (X), 2:03.6; Stur- 
geon (A|, 2:16.5: Taft (W), 2:20.8; 
Perlstein (W), 2:38.5. 

Heat No. 5: Farmer (L), 2:04.1; 
Frenkenberger (A), 2:15.5; Moter (S), 
2:20.5: Oldham (A), 2:31.4; Dittmeier 
(Tl, 2:40.6. 

Finals 

1. Kute, St. Xavier 2:00.9 

2. Farmer, Lafayette 2:03.6 

3. Hammonds. Lafayette 2:10.2 

4. Clephas, St. Xavier 2:14.8 

6. Frankenberger, Atherton 2:15.8 

6. Parsons, St. Xavier __2:18.7 

Kute set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 2:00.9. 

5. 100 Yard Backstroke- 
Heat No. 1: Finnegan (X). 1:08.2; 



Cummings (A), 1:11.6: Showalter 
1:19.6; Sawyer (A), 1:19.8; Frost 
1:31.5. 

Heat No. 2: Geiser (W), 1 
Bowen (X), 1:10.5; Terrill (L), 1 
Holliday (L), 1:18.9; Hall (W), 1 
O'Bryant (BS), 1:39.5. 

Heat No. 3: Terry (A), 1:04.9; 
(T), 1:13.4; Pinkerton (L), 
Kremer (X), 1:20.5; Taylo 

Heat No. 4: Vry (L) 
(BS), 1:11.3; Welsh (S), 
(W), 1:31.2. 

Finals 

Vry, Lafayette 

Geiser, Waggener 

Terry, Atherton 

Finnegan, St. Xavier 

St. Xa 



(A). 1 
1 :00.9 ; 
1:14.6; 



(T), 
(BS), 



:19.7; 

Perry 
:16.3 ; 
:21.0. 
Hash 
Ogle 



1:01.0 
1 :03.1 
1:06.6 
1:06.9 
10.9 



Hash, Bryan Station 1 :12.0 

6. 109 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1: Ackerman (X), 1:12.1 
Proctor (S), 1:14.2; Swisher (A), 1:19.7; 
Hueher (L), 1:20.9; Joseph (W), 1:24.4; 
Evans (S), 1:30.7. 

Heat No. 2: Walker (L). 1:12.6; 
Georgi (W), 1:15.9: Goodwin (T), 1:17.2; 
Sammons (L), 1:23.7; Boylan (W). 1:24.5; 
Stone (BS), 1:35.4. 

Heat No. 3: Koch (X), 1:09.8, Smith 
(A), 1:16.6: Stone (BS), 1:18.2; Burton 
(W). 1:22.8; Daugherty (BS), 1:28.2. 

Heat No. 4: Ambrose (X), 1:08.9; 
Buschmeyer (X). 1:15.7; Pohler (Tl. 
1:21.1; Hancock (T), 1:25.2; Wayman 
(BS), 1:29.6. 

Finals 

1. Koch, Atherton 1:09.8 

2. Ambrose, St. Xavier 1 :09.8 

3. Walker. Lafayette 1:10.5 

4. Ackerman, St. Xavier 1:10.9 

5. Proctor, Seneca 1:13.7 

6. Smith, Atherton 1 :16.7 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1: Prescott (X), :57.6 ; Nel- 
son (L), 1:05.1; Ogle (W), 1:07.0; Hart 
(BS), 1:07.1; DeFossett (T). 1:17.2. 

Heat No. 2: Dorton (W), :57.5 ; Webb 
(W), :59.7; Coblin (S), 1:06.7; Farley 
(L). 1:08.4. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Heat No. 3: Benn (A), :56.5; Hartye 
(Tl, 1:00.1; Jones (L), 1:04.8; Harpring 
(XU 1:05.9: Bohne (T), 1:10.3. 

Heat No. 4: W. Walker (L), :54.1 : 
Johnson (W). :59.6 : Goldblatt (S), 1:03.4; 
Dittemeir (T), 1:08.9; Campbell (BS), 
1:15.9. 

Finals 

1. W. Walker, Lafayette :54.1 

2. Benn. Atherton :56.4 

3. Dorton. Waggener :56.9 

4. Prescott. St. Xavier :58.0 

5. Webb, Waggener :59.5 

€. Johnson, Waggener :59.8 

W. Walker set a new state record in 
this event with his time of :54.1. 

8. Fancy Diving — 

1. Witte, Waggener 308.40 

2. Profumo. St. Xavier 273.75 

3. Shell. Seneca 229.60 

4. Collins. St. Xavier 206.40 

5. Brooks. Atherton 193.20 

6. Johnson. Lafayette 184.85 

7. Shuck. Waggener 177.70 

9. 200 Yard Individual Medley- 
Heat No. 1: W. Walker (L), 2:21.4; 

E. Walker (L). 2:25.4: Feldbaum (S), 
2:39.8: Parks (X). 2:49.8: Speevak (A), 
2:56.8: Sehlinger (X), 3:08.0. 

Heat No. 2: McGill (T), 2:24.8; 
Goodwin (T). 2:39.0; Hall (W), 2:45.2; 
ShowaJter (T), 2:47.5; Fuller (BS), 3:01,2: 
Wayman (BS), 3:28.6. 



Heat No. 3: Abbott (W), 2:16.5 
Driver (S). 2:34.5; Bowen (X), 2:38.2 
Godfrey (X), 2:42.9; Joseph (W), 2:53.9 
Gordon (W), 3:08.5. 

Finals 

1. Abbott, Waggener 2 :16.2 

2. W. Walker, Lafayette 2:21.2 

3. R. Walker, Lafayette 2 :23.2 

4. McGill, Trinity 2:24.4 

5. Driver, Seneca 2:34.2 

6. Bowen, St. Xavier 2:39.7 

Abbott set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2:16.2. 

10. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 
Heat No. 1: St. Xavier (Finnegan, 
Koch, Horton, Hubbuch) 1:57.6: Lafayette 
(Vry, Huebner, Freeman, Cookel 1:58.1: 
Seneca (Welsh, Benner. Proctor, Koz- 
love) 2:03.1: Waggener (Chase, Mitchell, 
Miller, Travis) 2 :04.2. 

Heat No. 2: Atherton (Cummings. 
Swisher, Rivers, Smith) 1 :59.9 : Bryan 
Station (Hash, Stone. Hart. Huston) 
2:01.2; Trinity (Caspar, Goodwin, Wright, 
Lage) 2:08.0. 

Finals 

1. St. Xaxier (Finnegan, Koch, Horton, 
Hubbuch) 1 :53.8 

2. Lafayette (Vry, Huebner, Freeman. 
Cooke) 1:57.5 

3. Atherton (Cummings, Swisher, Rivers, 
Smith) 1 :59.9 

4. Seneca (Welsh, Benner, Proctor, Koz- 
love) 2 :01.3 



5. Bryan Station (Hash, Stone, Hart, 
Huston) 2 :02.0 

6. Waggener (Chase. Mitchell, Miller, 

Travis) - 2 :05.4 

St. Xavier set a new state record in 

this event with the time of 1:53.8. 

11. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Heat No. 1 : Waggener (Kern, Webb, 
Johnson, SchoeningI, 1:43.4: Lafayette, 
(Murphy, Nelson, Nollenberger, Jones), 
1:47.3; Seneca (Goldblatt, Driver, Feld- 
), 1:48.4: Bryan Station 
Huston, Dabney), 1:48.4. 
2: St. Xavier (Prescott. 
Ambrose), 1:42.8: 
Hanson, Johnson, 



baum. Steveni 
(Wilson, Hart, 
Heat No. 
Aubrey. 
Atherton (Taylo 



Trinity (Asman, 



ikenberger ) 
Pohler, Reuff, Perry) 

Finals 
St. Xavier (Prescott, Aubrey, Parsons, 

Ambrose) 1 :40.6 

Waggener (Webb, Kern, Johnson, 

Schoening) 1 :43.0 

Bryan Station (Wilson, Hart, Huston, 

Dabney) 1 :47.0 

Lafayette (Murphy, Nelson, Nollen- 
berger, Jones I 1:47.5 

Seneca (Goldblatt, Driver, Feldbaum, 

Stevens) 1 :48.4 

Atherton (Taylor, Hansen, Johnson, 

Frankenberger) 1 :55.5 

St. Xavier set a new state record in 
event with the time of 1:40.6. 



University of Ken-lucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, Class B, March 31, 1962 



TEAM SCORING — Class "B" 



TEAM 


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Hig-hlands 


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4 

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1 8 
1 4 
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1 
1 

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1 


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1 





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1 

1 3 

1 5 



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1 

i 
i 3 
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1 -1 
1 1 
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1 
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1 

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1 
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1 

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55 
50 


Univei'sitv 


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Beechwood 


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26 


Fort Knox 


19 


Lexington Cath. 


16 


Bellevue 


10 


M. M. I. 


5 


Hopkinsville 


5 


Harrodsburg 


1 2 




1 



1. 



CLASS "B" 
Results 
50 Yard Freestyle- 



Heat No. 1: Wade (Un), :26.5 ; Prim- 
rose (Hp), :26.7; Rieskamp (Cc), :26.7 ; 
Trunnel (Hi), :29.1 ; Summerson (Ft), 
:2S.8: Potter (Ha), :36.1. 

Heat No. 2: Reik (Hi), :26.1 ; Saf- 

ford (Ft), :27.4; Freeman (Un), :28.0 ; 

Phillips (Un), :36.1; Batsel (Un), :36.8 ; 
Roach (Ha), :38.3, 



Heat No. 3: Dade (Ha), :26.8 ; Baker 
(Be), :28.2; Duffey (Mm), :29.1 ; Blank 
(Cc), :29.5; Saunders (Bv), :37.0 ; Se- 
bring (Ha), :38.4. 

Heat No. 4: Pierce (Be), :26.5 ; Fox 
(Cc), :28.4; Painter (Hi), :28.5 ; Cohoon 
(Hp), :30.0; VanArsdall (Ha), :31.5 ; 
Owens (Bv), :39.0. 

Heat No. 5: Petit (Lc), :24.5 ; Wins- 
low (Hi), :27.7; Perez (Cc), :27.9 ; 
Hewetson (Bv), :43.4 ; Gilbert (Bv), :51.8. 

Finals 
1. Petit, Lexington Cath. :25.5 



Reik, Highlands 

Pierce, Beechwood 

Wade, University 

Primrose, Hopkinsville 

Rieskamp, Covington Cath. 



25,6 
26.4 
26.6 
26.9 
26.8 



2. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1: Wade (Un), 
Grayson (Cc), 1:16.3: Whitley 
1:23.5; Tilton (Ft), 1:25.2; Quinr 
1:25.4; Oyler (Ft), 1:43.1. 

Heat No. 2: Fulmer (Hi), 
Rettig (Cc), 1:18.3; Dawson (Be), 



1:09.8; 

(Ft). 

> (Lc), 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Page Five 



1:06.5: 
1:18.8; 
1 :28.7. 



Hellrri 
Fulmi 
Wade 
Adda 



Hill (Hi). 1:27.5: Shropshire (Un), 1:39.6 
Boeh (Bv), 1:44.0. 

Heat No. 3: Hellman (Cc), 
Addams (Hi). 1:15.0: Ware (Be). 
Cobb (Cc). 1:19.0: Ferguson (Bv) 
Finals 

m, Covington Cath. 1:05.3 

r. Highlands 1:07.8 

University 1 :11.1 

IS, Highlands 1:15.7 

Rettig. Covington Cath. 1 :19.0 

Grayson, Covington Cath. 1 :20.0 

Hellman set a new state record in 
this event with his time of 1:05.3. 

3. TOO Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1: Hoppenjans (Cc), 1:16.5; 
Corbett (Cc). 1:26.0; Quinn (Lc), 1:30.6; 
French (Ft). 1 :30.7. 

Heat No. 2: Clark (Ft). 1:18.8; Gray- 
son (Cc), 1:22.3: Southgati 
Gulp (Bv), 1:45.6. 

Heat No. 3 : Roeding 
Fortier (Mm), 1:21.9; Johnson 
1:39.6; Brewer (Un). 1:51.7. 

Heat No. 4: Cavana (Bv), 
Scharstein (Hi), 1:24.8; Roth (Hi), 
Maddox (Un), 1 :47.3. 

Finals 

1. Roeding, Covington Cath. 

2. Fortier. Millersburg Mil. Inst. . 

3. Hoppenjans, Covington Cath, . 

4. Cavana, Bellevue 

5. Clark, Fort Knox 

6. Grayson, Covington Cath, 

4. 100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No, 1: Reik (Hi), 1:05.0 

(Cc), 1:06,4; Kuhnhein (Hi), 

Saum (Ft), 1:13.6; Wilbanks (Ft), 

Shropshire (Un), 1:23,3. 

Heat No. 2: .Jordan (Be), 
(Lc), 1:04,5: Hall (Hi), 



Suethols (Cc), 1:10.7: Roach (Ha), 1:40.7. 

Heat No. 3: Bootes (Hi), :58.3 ; 
Spencer (Ft), 1:03.3: Auge (Be), 1:21.1. 

Heat No. 4: Wade (Lc). :55.5 ; Dade 
(Hp), 1:02,9; Primrose (Hp), 1:03.7: 
Graham (Cc), 1:11.8. 

Heat No. 5: Petit (Lc), :55.6 ; Runge 
(Ccl, 1:05,1: Irish (Ft), 1:05.7; Wilson 



(Be), 1:29.0. 



Un 



Finals 

sity 



(Be). 
(Cc). 



_1:15.3 
-1:17.1 
-1:18.1 



ington Cath. 

Jordan, Beechwood 

Bootes, Highlands 

Dade, Hopkinsville 1 

Spencer. Fort Knox 1 

Wade set a new state record in 
event with his time of :55.1. 



a. Fancy Diving 

1. Cavana, Bellevue 211.10 

2. Glass, Highlands 197,70 

3. Jones, Highlands 164.00 

4. Ketz, Highlands 160.10 

5. Adair, Beechwood 156.20 

fi. Cohoon, Hopkinsville 144.15 

7. Triplett, Highlands 137.10 

6. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 

Heat No. 1: Roeding, (Cc), 2:33.8; 
Rettig (Cc), 2:55.4; Ware (Be), 3:07.0. 

Heat No. 2: Wade (Un), 2:22.2; 
Moreman (Lc), 2:50.2; Corbett (Cc), 
3:05.5: Bankson (Ft), 3:11.9; Grayson 
(Cc), 3:18.2. 

Finals 

1. Wade. University 2:21.2 

2. Roeding, Covington Cath. 2:25.4 

3. Moreman, Lexington Cath. 2:45.9 

4. Rettig, Covington Cath. 2:56.2 

5. Corbett, Covington Cath, 3:08.5 

Wade set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2:21.2. 



7. 200 Yard Medley Relay- 
Finals 

1. Covington Cath. (F. Hellman, Hoppen- 
jans, S. Hellman. Perez) 1:58.1 

2. Fort Knox (Whitley, Clark, Dawson, 
Spencer) 2 :09.2 

3. Highlands (Addams, Scharstein, Jones, 
Painter) 2 :12.6 

4. Beechwood (Dawson, G. Baker, Allan, 
B. Baker) 2:19,2 

5. University (Reeves, Maddox. McKelvey, 

Poole) 2 :22.3 

Covington Catholic set a new state 

record in this event with the time of 



03.2 1:58.1. 



8. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Heat No. 1 : Covington Cath. (Gray- 
son, Fox, Hellman, Rieskamp), 1:46.7; 
Beechwood (Allan Southgate. Pierce. Jor- 
dan), 1:46.9; Harrodsburg (Sebring, 
Sims, Trower, VanArsdall), 2:12.1; Belle- 
vue (Boeh, Gulp, Saunders, Ferguson), 
2:18,0. 

Heat No. 2: Highlands (Winslow, Ful- 
mer, Bootes, Reik), 1:44.4; Fort Knox 
(Dawson. Irish, Summerson. Safford), 
1 :51,3 ; University (Gambill, Reeves, Mc- 
Kelvey, Freeman), 1:55.0. 
Finals 

1. Highlands (Winslow, Fulmer, Bootes. 
Reik) 1 :45.0 

2. Beechwood (Pierce, Allan, Southgate, 
Jordan) 1 :46.9 

3. Covington Cath. (Grayson. Fox, Hell- 
man, Rieskamp) 1:47.4 

4. Fort Knox (Dawson, Irish, Summer- 
son, Safford) 1:52.5 

5. University (Gambill. Reeves, McKel- 
vey, Freeman) 2:00.5 

6. Harrodsburg (Potter, Trower. Van- 
Arsdall, Sims) 2:11.0 



SHOCKER ROOMS 

by Dr. Don Cash Seaton 
Head, U. K. Physical Education Dept. 

My graduate class has just completed in- 
spection of a number of physical education 
facilities in a county where some of the fin- 
est schools in the state are said to be found. 
The locker rooms of all of these schools are 
so poorly planned, so small, and so inadequate 
in regard to lockers, showers and toilet fa- 
cilities that it has led me to entitle this 
article "Shocker - Rooms." 

The last high school that we visited was 
built for 800 students and now is jammed 
with 1,600. Its locker rooms are so superior 
to all others that they could be called deluxe. 
But just imagine there are 40 lockers and 
60 baskets in the boys' locker room to accom- 
modate 800 boys, including the athletic 
teams. The girls' locker room is equally as 
poorly equipped, but they do not have varsity 
teams in football, basketball, track, and base- 
ball to accommodate. 

Can you imagine any planning committee, 
school board, or architect, furnishing a 
school of today with one locker room approxi- 
mately 60' (X) 40' with 40 lockers and 60 
baskets for 800 boys to dress for physical 
education and to, also, accommodate a foot- 
ball squad of approximately 60 members, a 
basketball squaci of 30, a track team of about 



25, and a baseball team of some 25 for a total 

of 140 athletes? 

Other Schools Are Worse 

If you are a coach or school administrator 
you will readily answer "yes" to the above 
question because you have seen locker rooms 
ten times as bad as the one mentioned above. 
We visited one school built in 1954 with a 
combination gym and cafeteria that has no 
locker rooms. Even this is to be preferred to 
the stinking hole that is called a locker room 
in another city location. The modern-day 
janitor would look with disdain upon it as a 
closet for his gear. 
Dressing Room Standards 

To provide adequate space for locker 
and dressing rooms nationally accepted for- 
mulas must govern the architect and plan- 
ning committee. A general "rule-of-the- 
thumb" would be to provide the same amount 
of space for the service area (dressing rooms, 
shower rooms, and toilets) as the playing 
floor area. A more realistic size for the aver- 
age high school would be determined by the 
following formula: For a high school of 600 
pupils, 300 boys and 300 girls, the area need- 
ed for dressing rooms is 2.88 (X) 55 plus 
100 (X) 14. This is 1,558.4 square feet of 
space for boys. The same space for girls 
brings the total to 3,116.8. 
Locker Standards 

The most desirable locker system is the 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Pag-e Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

The spacious Crystal Ballroom of Louis- 
ville's Brown Hotel soon will not be large 
enough to accommodate all the principals, 
coaches, and officials who want to attend 
the annual KjH.S.A.A. dinner each April. Al- 
most six hundred sat down at tables which 
had to be placed so closely together that 
everybody had to do "The Twist" to move 
between them. The success of this mammoth 
affair is another tribute to the organizational 
ability of the Commissioner, Assistant Com- 
missioner, and the Board of Control. 

A lot of Kentucky's outstanding men 
were there, but a fighting kid, Howard Hern- 
don, Jr., of Wingo was the "King of Them 
All" on this occasion. Wlhen this Game Guy 
of 1962 was presented his award for accomp- 
lishing the most in sports in spite of a physi- 
cal handicap, the tremendous crowd stood to 
applaud and cheer. 

Preston "Ty" Holland, a member of the 
Board of Control, did a magnificent job in 
making the presentation and the seventeen 
year old Game Guy amazed everybody with 
his excellently-delivered acceptance speech. 
This lad won the hearts of every Kentuckian 
in the room. 

Seated at a front table was the Game 
Guy's family, bursting with pride. Reverend 
Howard Herndon, Sr., Mrs. Herndon, How- 
ard's pretty, red-haired sister, and his aunt 
and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Brown, had 
taken a plane from far-distant western Ken- 
tucky to be with their boy when all of Ken- 
tucky paid tribute to his courage and de- 
termination. 

Howard's mother remarked, "This is the 
finest thing which could happen to my boy." 
His father, Reverend Howard Herndon, Sr., 
said, "God bless these Kentuckians and the 
K.H.S.A.A. for this encouragement of physi- 
cally-handicapped young people." Uncle and 
Aunt Jim Brown radiated love and pride as 
they thanked Commissioner Sanford for the 
happy occasion. 

This was a great occasion for Howard 
Herndon, Jr., and his family but it was also 
great for the hundreds of other handicapped 
young men and women who will be inspired 
by the Wingo Game Guy's example. 

Maybe you didn't know that President 
Adron Doran of Morehead State College hails 
from this thriving little town of Wingo ! The 
day following the banquet Ray Homback, 
Morehead's Public Relations Director, was 
looking for the "Game Guy" of 1962. He 



wants this kid with his scholastic record of 
"A's" and "B's" to join that other great guy 
from Wingo, Adron Doran, as a student on 
his Morehead College Campus. 

The banquet hall was full of outstanding 
and modest Kentuckians. Nobody at his table 
knew that Lexington's "Pete" Kemper had 
been presented the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
for a lifetime of service to the youth of Ken- 
tucky and had been proclaimed one of "Na- 
ture's Noblemen." 

When Edgar McNabb, the "Grandaddy 
of all Sports Officials," spilled coffee in 
"Rock" Reese's lap, Rock was honored be- 
cause he had been "spilled on" by a fellow 
who had recently appeared on Mel Allen's 
coast to coast sports show. 

At another table sat a gentleman who 
has made men out of a multitude of Ken- 
tucky boys, personable John Trapp, principal 
of Jefferson County's Eastern High School. 
John had recently received the Abou Ben 
Adhem for his school for outstanding sports- 
manship practices on the nation-wide radio 
program, Monitor. 

Herschel Roberts of Fort Knox, another 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor winner, was telling 
the fellows at his table the high regard he 
held for the personal touch given the admin- 
istration of high school athletics in Ken- 
tucky. It was a great night for Kentuckians. 

The President's Committee for Employ- 
ment of the Physically Handicapped has 
asked for a story giving the details of Ken- 
tucky's "Game Guy Program." The story is 
in Washington now ready for publication. 

This is The Dutchman's last column until 
autumn. Summer is here — Have you organiz- 
ed a summer playground program for your 
community? 

Kids are going to play in either the right 
places or the wrong ones. Where they play 
and how they play is your responsibility 
and mine. 



1961-62 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
tennis teams, and forty-five girls' tennis teams. These 
numbers all represent increases over the last year. 
Tentative plans have been made to set up a champion- 
ship in Rifle Marksmanship, scheduled to be on suc- 
cessive vfeekends early in May. A girls' golf champion- 
ship will not be attempted this year, but this sport 
has possibilities for the future. 

The expanding progTam of the K.H.S.A.A. would 
not be possible were it not for the fine cooperation of 
numerous men in the state, working with the Com- 
missioner, the Assistant Commissioner, and the Board 
of Control. This teamwork is always appreciated. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Page Seven 



LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1962 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Connie Abele, Jeannie Todd, Marvin Lyons, Cherrie Ruppert. 
Second Row: Pamela Johnson, Gay Huddart, Sharon Ashley, Ruth Ann Downing, Judy Huddart. 
Third Row: Pamela Nallinger, Patty Taylor, Candy Johnson, Susan Farmer, Vickie Duncan, Mary 
Heller, Mrs. Fragstein (Coach). Fourth Row: Jackie Robertson. Jane Todd, Dee Dee Nugent, 
Fredie Zimmer, Nancy Combs, Jane Wightma i, Martha Daily. 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 31, 1962 



TEAM SCORING — Girls' Meet 



TEAM 











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Lafayette 

Waggener 

Hopkinsville . 
Dixie Heights 
Harrodsburg . 

University 

Fort Knox __. 



Pag-e Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Results 



3. 



1. 100 Yard Butterfly- 
Heat No. 1: Wade (Un), 1:20.0; Hud- 
dart, (Lai. 1:47.5. 

Heat No. 2: Henderson (Wa), 1:25.8; 
Abele (La). 1:26.1; Bartows, (Wa) 1:38.7; 
Van Sant (Ha), 1:57.7. 
Finals 
1 Wade. University 1:18.0 

Abele, Lafayette 1:23.5 Meyers (Un) 

Henderson. Waggener 1 :26.8 

Barrows, Waggener 1 :41.1 

Huddart, Lafayette 1 :42.1 

Van Sant, Harrodsburg 2:03.4 



Roberts, Harrodsburg 1 :30.5 

Dietriclc, Waggener 1 ;38.6 

Brown, Harrodsburg 1 :45.2 



Henderson, Waggener 1 ;04.3 

Wade, University 1:08.0 



2. 100 Yard Backstroke- 
Heat No. 1: James (Dh), 1:23.2: 

Brown (Ha), 1:39.5; Johnson (La), 1:42.0; 

Martin (Ha), 1:69.8. 

Heat No. 2: Roberts (Ha), 1:31.3; 

Williams (Wa), 1:46.2; Curtise (Un), 

1:63.0; Johnson (Dh), 2:00.5. 

Heat No. 3: Lyons (La), 1:17.0; 

Dietriek (La), 1:44.2; Telese (Ft), 1:50.8; 

Day (Ft), 1:57.6; Stoll (Un), 2:07.1. 
Finals 

1. Lyons. Lafayette 1 :17.5 

2. James. Dixie Heights 1:24.3 



100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1; Dade (Hp), 1:37.0; Hen- 
derson (Wa), 1:45.2: Downing (La), 
1:38.1; Sloan (Un), 2:36.0. 

Heat No. 2: Todd (La), 1:20.3; Mid- 
daugh (Ha), 2:02.6; Basham (Ft), 2:06.3; 
2:24.8. 
Finals 

1. Todd, Lafayette 1:20.4 

2. Dade, Hopkinsville 1:37.3 

3. Downing, Lafayette 1:43.9 

4. Henderson. Waggener 1 :46.1 

5. Middaugh, Harrodsburg 1 :59.2 

4. 100 Yard Freestyle- 
Heat No. 1: Robei-tson (Wa), 1:12.0; 

Fai-mer (La), 1:24.8; Ashley (La), 1:24.6; 

Rollo, (Dh), 1:39.4. 

Heat No. 2: Wade (Un), 1:11.0; Poher 

(Ha). 1:18.6; Higgins (Hp), 1:28.5; 

Smith (Ft), 1:39.6. 

Heat No. 3: Henderson (Wa), 1:04.5; 

Wood (Dh), 1:10.2; Stone (Hp), 1:18.4; 



Wood. Dixie Heights 
Robertson, Waggener 
Stone, Hopkinsville — 
Wearen, Harrodsburg 



_1 :09.5 
_1:12.8 
.1:15.4 
_1:17.8 



(Ha), 1:18.2; 



Edv 



(Ft), 



K. H. S. C. A. 



Executive Committee Meeting- 
Held in Louisville, April 4, 1962 

Prior to the regular business meeting of the Ken- 
tucky High School Coaches Association, the Execu- 
tive Committee of the association passed two new 
rules to be added to the Constitution and By-Laws of 
the organization: 

1. By motion of Greenwell, seconded by Wright, 
it was proposed that a standard plaque be given to the 
outgoing President of the K.H.S.C.A. The motion 
carried. 

2. A motion was made by Wright, seconded by 
Greenwell, that each year the "Coach of the Yeax" 
of the previous year in the respective sports of foot- 
ball and basketball make the presentation of the 
awards to "Coaches of the Year" for the current 
year. The motion carried. 

Immediately following the regular business meet- 
ing, a called meeting of the executive board was held 
for the purpose of electing a manager for the All- 
Star football and basketball games for 1963. Sydnor 
(Daviess County) nominated Estill Branham. This 
was seconded by Wright (Ashland). The motion 
carried. Branham was elected to serve in 1963. 

Members of the executive board present were: 
Wallace Sydnor, Daviess County, Retiring President; 
Ralph Dorsey, Cavema, President; Richard Greenwell, 
Shelby ville, Vice-President; Bob Wright, Ashland, 
Sgt.-at-Arms; Charles Kubn, Male, Sgt.-at-Arms 
(Elected); Estill Branham, Warren County, Games 
Manager. 

Annual Business Meeting- 
Held in Louisville, April 4, 1962 

Approximately one hundred seventy-five members 
of the Kentucky High School Coaches Association met 
Wednesday night at 7:30 p.m. in Parlor A of the Ken- 
tucky Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky. 

President Ralph Dorsey (Cavema) called the 
meeting to order at 7:35, and requested that James 
McAfee, former basketball coach of Versailles High 
School and newly elected principal of the Mt. Ster- 
ling, High School open the meeting with prayer. ^ 

Several guests were recognized by the presiding 
officer. Among the guests were members of the press, 
coillege coaches, the commissioner of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association, a member of the 



Fancy Diving — 

Ruppert. Lafayette 87.50 

Stone, Hopkinsville 85.80 

Johnson, Dixie Heights 73.66 

Burkel, Waggener 73.20 

Smith. Fort Knox 73.05 

Lierman, Dixie Heights 71.50 

Duncan, Lafayette 70.60 

Queen, University 62.05 

200 Yard iWedley Relay- 
Finals 

Lafayette (Lyons, Todd, Abele, Hud- 
dart) 2 :22.4 

Waggener (Henderson, Sloan, Bar- 
rows, Robertson) 2:43.8 

Harrodsburg (Potter, Middaugh, Van 

Sant, Wearen) 2:68.9 

Fort Knox (Day, Basham, Telese, 
Edwards) 3 :11.8 

Board of Control, and the retiring president of the 
Coaches Association. (Bill Endicott of the Courier; 
Don Shelton of Murray; George SaJdler of Campbells- 
ville College; Theo. A. Sanford of K.H.S.A.A.; Preston 
' Ty" Holland, Board of Control; and Wallace "Buck" 
Sydnor of Daviess County). 

A motion by Young (Manual), seconded by Clai- 
borne (Daviess County) that the reading of the minu- 
tes be suspended, as they had been printed in the May 
issue of the ATHLETE, official publication of the 
K.H.S.A.A., was carried. 

Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr (Irvine) read the 
financial statements of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association and the All-Star Accounts. These 
statements represent an audit that is made annually. 
Kirwan (Atherton) moved and Branham (Warren 
County), seconded that the report be accepted. The 
motion carried. 

The Vice-President of the K.H.S.A.A., Richard 
Greenwell (Shelby ville), presented to the coaches 
Charlie Bradshaw, Head Football Coach of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. Some of the quotes from Mr. 
Bradshaw's speech are as follows: 

"I came back to Kentucky because of the pride of 
Kentucky people, because of Kentucky's rich tradi- 
tions, arjd I'll guarantee that, if the coaches of Ken- 
tucky rededicate their efforts, the nation will not be 
talking about the great football in Mississippi, Ala- 
bama and Louisiana, but Kentucky football will come 
to the foreground. 

"I hope that you coaches are not 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. coaches. You won't get rich in the coaching pro- 
fession, but you have the greatest opportunity in your 
community to develop the youngsters of Kentucky. 

"We at the University of Kentucky are going to 
pride ourselves on three things: 1). Christianity-In- 
corporate the church in your program; 2). Education- 
Quality education must be stressed and the athlete 
must pay the price in the classroom; 3). Football- A 
firm attitude wall be expressed, a sympathetic atti- 
tude will be shown, a 100% effort will be demanded. 

"Keep your practice periods short, interesting and 
varied. A practice session should not last more than 
two hours. 

"When coaches can convince the parents that they 
are working for the interest and growth of the in- 
dividual boy, then they can get the help of the parents. 

"A high school atletic program should emphasize 
football, basketball, track, baseball and other sports. 

"A junior high program in football is absolutely 
necessary to improve football in Kentucky." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Page Nine 



Coach Bradshaw urged that spring football not 
be abandoned, but suggested that legislation be pass- 
ed regulating spring practice. He recommended that 
all football spring practice be ended by March 31, 
and that thus it would not interfere with spring sports. 
In closing Bradshaw emphasized the joy of win- 
ning and called the coaches attention that the finest 
opportunity of service to mankind is in their hands, 
working with the greatest asset in America, its 
youth. 

President Dorsey read the reply from J. Mai-vin 
Dodson, Executive Secretary of the Kentucky Educa- 
tion Association, relative to the request to conduct a 
coaches clinic on Thursday morning of K.E.A. The 
reply neither sanctioned nor disapproved of the clinic, 
but since the clinic would have conflicted with ths 
first ge.-eral meeting it was decided not to hold a 
clinic in conflict with the K.E.A. session. 

Each member in attendance was furnished a copy 
of a survey regarding the clinic. The survey furnish- 
ed valuable informatioi regarding topics for discus- 
sion, time for conducting the clniic, phases of sports 
to be discussed and whether high school coaches or 
college coaches should conduct the clinics. 

George Claiborne (Daviess County) expressed the 
feeling that the Kentucky State Medical Association 
further its efforts in holding clinics, and complimented 
the Association for its efforts in the past. 

John Meihaus (St. Xavier) announced that the 
Louisville Football Coaches Association will have 
a football clinic on Friday night of K.E.A. in 1963. 
This clinic is to be conducted by high school footbali 
people, with at least one out of the state coach taking- 
part. Everyo.iie is invited. 

James McAfee moved that a committee of five 
basketball coaches be appointed by President Dorsey 
and that the committee provide for a basketball clinic 
in 1963. Paul Miller (Flaget) seconded the motion, 
which carried. 

Roy Kidd, football coach of Madison High School, 
Richmond, Kentucky, was recognized as the "Coach of 
the Year" for 1961. Homer Rice, "Coach of the Year" 
in 1960, now a member of the University of Kentucky 
football staff, was to make the presentation but was 
unable to attend. Owen Hauck, assistant coach to Rice 
at Highlands, represented Rice and made the presen- 
tation to Kidd. In acceptance Kidd praised his assist- 
ant coaches and paid high tribute to the players of 
Madison High. 

Bob Wright, Sgt.-at-Arms of the K.H.S.C.A. and 
"Coach of the Year" in 1961 in basketball, presented 
the "Coach of the Year" basketball trophy to James 
Bazzell (Allen County). Bazzell has been elected 
"Coach of the Year" for 1962 by the vote of his fel- 
low coaches. Bazzell recognied his assistant coach and 
paid tribute to iiis players from Allen County. 

Joe Ohr (Irvine) was re-elected Secretary-Treasur- 
er for 1963-64. Meihaus (St. Xavier) nominated Ohr, 
and Miller (Flaget) seconded the motion. No other 
nominations were offered. 

Three members of the association were nominated 
for the Sg-t.-at-Arms office. Charles Kuhn (Male), S. 
T. Roach (Dunbar), and "Buzz" Frazier (Anderson) 
were the nominees, with Kuhn being elected. 

It was moved by Jack Kleier and seconded by Guy 
Strong that the Coaches Associatio.a delegate present 
to the delegate assembly a proposal limiting spring 
football practice. The proposal was to close practice 
on March 31. McAfee (Versailles) offered an amend- 
ment to the proposal extending the deadline to April 
15. Boyd (Anderson) seconded tJhe motion. President 
Dorsey's call for votes found the amendent being de- 
feated. The vote on the original motion also failed. 

Greenwell (Shelbyville) moved and Caple (LaRue 



County) seconded that a proposal be offered limiting 
spring football to a period of twenty days. This pro- 
posal was defeated. 

Branham moved that the meeting be adjourned, 
Wallace seconded the motion, and the motion caiTied. 

The meeting adjourned at 10:00 p.m. 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
ate for membership on the Board of Control 
must be actively engaged as a secondary 
school principal in his local section, be tabled. 
The motion was carried. 

S. M. Matarazzo moved, seconded by 
Arthur Walsh, that Proposal X, providing 
that Article IV, Section 2-b be amended to 
provide that each representative and alter- 
nate to the Delegate Assembly shall be a 
secondary school principal, be adopted. The 
motion failed to carry. 

W. W. Chumbler moved, seconded by H. 
R. Bowling, that Proposal XI, calling for an 
amendment to By-Law 28 to provide no 
organized practice in football and basketball 
shall be held earlier than the beginning of 
a four-calendar-week period immediately 
prior to the opening contest, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

W. W. Chumbler moved, seconded by 
Harry Hardin, that Proposal XII, calling for 
an amendment to By-Law 21 to provide that 
not more than one football game shall be 
played on a day preceding a regular school 
day, be tabled. The motion was carried. 

Foster Sanders moved, seconded by W. W. 
Chumbler, that Proposal XIII, providing that 
the site of the State Basketball Tournament 
shall be determined by a vote of K.H.S.A.A. 
member school principals, be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

James Caudill moved, seconded by L. J. 
Twyman, that Proposal XIV, calling for an 
amendment to By-Law 21 to provide that 
a K.H.S.A.A. member school basketball team 
be limited to a maximum of twenty-four 
games, including one invitational tourna- 
ment, without taking into account whether 
or not the school maintains a football team, 
be adopted. S. M. Matarazzo moved, second- 
ed by Courtlan-d Cox, that the proposal be 
amended by substituting "excluding" for 
"including." The amendment failed to carry. 
A vote was then taken on the original motion 
which failed to carry. 

There being no further business, Presi- 
dent Crowdus declared the meeting adjourn- 
ed. 

The dinner meeting of the Association 
was held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel at 6:30 P.M., with 555 delegates 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



and other school officials present. Recipient 
of the Game-Guy Award was Howard Hern- 
don, Jr. of Wingo. The presentation of the 
award was made by K.H.S.A.A. Director 
Preston Holland. 

Several musical numbers were given by 
the Irvine High School Girls' Trio and their 
director, Mr. Thomas Bonny. 

President Frank G. Dickey of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky gave the address of the 
evening, speaking on the topic "What is 
Right with Athletics in Kentucky." Dr. 
Dickey listed seven basic advantages of high 
school athletics. His remarks were well re- 
ceived by all of those in attendance at the 
meeting. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athle.tic Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, on Friday morning, April 6, 1962. The meeting 
was called to order by President W. H. Crowdus at 
10:00, with all Board members, Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the reading of the minutes of the March 16th 
meeting be waived since members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on state 
basketball receipts and expenses. He stated that total 
receipts, including ticket sales, prog-ram profits, and 
radio fees, would be approximately .$148,000.00, and he 
esitimat?d that profits to the Association will be a 
figure close to $104,000.00. 

Jack Dawson presented a request from the Jeffer- 
son County Principals ' Association, suggesting a 
geographical division of the county into two distriots 
for football, basketball, and baseball, with Preston 
Street being the dividing line. It was requested that 
this re-distrioting become effective in September, 1962. 
Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Robert P. For- 
sythe, that Mr. Dawson's recommendation and that of 
the Jefferson County Principals Association be grant- 
ed. The motion was canied unanimously. 

It was pointed out tliat the consolidation of the 
Harrison County and Cynthiana School Districts for 
1962-63 would result in only three schools being in 
basketball District 37. After a general discussion, 
Preston Holland moved, seconded by Robert P. For- 
sythe, that M.M.I, be moved from District 40 to Dis- 
trict 37. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Don Rawlings reported that a request had been 
received for possible re-districting in basketball Dis- 
trict 47, cm'rently the largest district in the state from 
the standpoint of the number of schools. Oran C. 
Teater moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the re- 
quest be g-iven consideration, looking toward the relief 
requested for District 47, but that no action be taken at 
this meeting since no member of the Board was pi-e- 
pared to present a recommendation for a possible 
change at this time. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There was a discussion concerning the site of the 
State Higli School Basketball Toumament for 1963. 
Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that the decision on the toumament site be made for 
a two-year period. The motion failed to carry, the 
vote being 4-2 against the motion. K. G. Gillaspie 



moved, seconded by Robert P. Forsythe, that the site 
of the 1963 State High School Basketball Tom-nament 
be decided by secret ballot. The motion canied by a 
vote of 7-1. Robert P. Forsythe moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that, if the Commissioner can make the 
nsoeissary arrangements, the 1963 State High School 
Basketball Tournament be held at Freedom Hall in 
Louisville. The motion carried by a vote of 5-3. Cecil 
A. Thornton moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that the 1964 State Hig-h School' Basketball Tourna- 
ment be held in Lexington. Robert P. Forsythe moved, 
seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that this motion be 
tabled. The motion canied by a vote of 6-2. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by Robert P. 
'Foi'sythe, that the summer meeting of the Board of 
Control be held at Kenlake Hotel, Hardin, Kentucky, 
late in July, preferably on the third or fourth week- 
end if lodging arrangements for either of these dates 
could be made by the Commissioner. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
that Don R. Rawlings be named delegate and Pi'eston 
Holland alternate to the forthcoming summer meeting 
of the National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by K. G. GUlaspie, 
that all bills of the Association for the period begin- 
ning Marcel 16. 1962, and ending April 5, 1962, be 
approved. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 

Ky. Coaches Association 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 2, 1962 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

As per instructions from your Seci'etary, Mr. Joe 
Ohr, I have examined the records of your organization 
submitted to me by Mr. Ohr, for the period March 
11, 1961, to March 5, 1962. 

All transactions during this period are shown on 
the accompanying schedule of Receipts and Disburse- 
ments. Both receipts and disbursements on the sched- 
ule have been traced into the bank and the disburse- 
ments are substantiated by canceled checks. 

In my opinion, this schedule properly reflects 
receipts and disbursements for the period showm. The 
balance of $7,044.22 has been confirmed as being on 
deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 
Kentucky, as of March 5, 1962. 

Yours verv truly, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR., Auditor 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCTA- 
TION STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DIS- 
BURSEMENTS FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 11, 
1961, TO MARCH 5, 1962. 
RECEIPTS: 

Bank Balance March 11, 1961 $5,659.61 

Membership Dues $1,102.00 

Grants from K.H.S.A.A. 1,000.00 2.102.00 

Total $7,761.61 

EXPENSES: 

E. R. Smith. P.M. — postage S 8.00 

Joe Ohr — Delegate to KEA 25.00 

Sports Center — Coach of Year Awards 82.40 

Sexton Ins. Agency — Treas. Bond 31.25 

State Treasurer— Filing Fee 2.00 

Kentuckian Hotel — All-Star Hdq. 152.39 

Joe Ohr— Expenses All-Star Games -- 19.50 

E. R. Smith. P.M.— Postage 6.00 

Charles Kolasa — Grant 100.00 

Ky. Telephone Co. 

Long Distance Calls 6.10 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



Page Eleven 



Joe Ohr — Collection 1091 Members 272.75 

2 Checks Returned uncollected 12.00 

Total Expense Disbursements 717.39 

BALANCE $7,044.22 

Balance per Bank Statement in Union 

Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, Kentucky, 

as of March 5, 1962 $7,044.22 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 2, 1962 

Executive Committee 

East-West All Star Football & Basketball Games of 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Gentlemen: 

As per instructions froim your Secretary, Mr. Joe 
Ohr, I have examined the records of your organiza- 
tion submitted to me by Mr. Ohr for the period Febru- 
ary 24, 1961 through March 14, 1962. 

Results of the various transactions for this period 
are shown on the attached schedule of receipts and 
disbursements. The balance of $17,874.64 has been 
confirmed as being on deposit in the First Security 
National Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Ken- 
tuclty. 

The records disclose net receipts from All Stao- 
Games ticket sales as being $8,106.25 after deductions 
of expenses. Program receipts from the 1961 All Star 
Games amounted to $539.17 and there was a receipt 
of $76.06 from 1960 programs, making a total from 
this source of $669.63. 

The total receipts of $8,791.48 agrees in amount 
with the deposits made in the First Security National 
Bank & Trust Company, Lexington, Ky. 

All receipts and disbursements as shown in the 
attached schedule appear to be correct and in my 
opinion this schedule con-ectly reflects the receipts 
and disbursements for the period stated. 

In addition to the above balance, I have confirm- 
ed a balance of $4,039.36 in Kentuck-y High School 
Coaches Association Savings Account in the Columbia 
Federal Savings and Loan Association, Covington, 
Kentucky as of March 9, 1962. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR., Auditor 

EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL AND BAS- 
KETBALL GAMES of the KENTUCKY HIGH 
SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION STATEMENT 
OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 
THE PERIOD FROM FEBRUARY 24, 1961 THRU 
MARCH 14, 1962. 

RECEIPTS: 

Balance in First Nafl Bank & Trust Co., 

Lexington. Kv., on February 24, 1961 $13,987.03 

Receipts from All-Star Games $8,106.25 

Program Receipts 669.23 

Reimbursement for Watch 16.00 

8,791.48 

Total $22,778.51 

EXPENSES: 

Change for All-Star Games $ 600.00 

Printing 406.67 

Audit of Records 1500 

Tickets 40.10 

Travel Expenses — Players 724.60 

Photos 100.43 

Insurance 383.00 

Manager's Salary 500.00 

Coaches Salaries 1,000.00 

T-Shirts & Awards for Players 543.90 

Sales Tax 220.70 

Manager's Expenses 179.97 

Federal Taxes 189.50 

Total Expense Disbursements 4,903.87 

BALANCE. March 14, 1962 $17,874.64 

Balance in First Security National Bank 

& Trust Company, Lexington, Ky., 

on March 14, 1962 $17,874.64 



Don't Blame It On Education 
by Supt. Ben Flora 
Irvine City Schools 

Yes, there may be some over-emphasis on time 
consuminig extra-cuiTicular activities that is now a 
big study of the State Board of Education and the 
CommMssion on Public Education, but to blame the 
schools and to criticize education in general and extra- 
cuiricular activities is not the answer to the problem. 
To inteirfeire with the programs, now a definite 
part of every school system in this state and most 
every state, is to suggest that we have failed, or are 
failing in our educational systems. If such were even 
remotely true, how could we have turned out the mosit 
successful and most prosperous business people in the 
entire world, and don't overlook the fact that Ken- 
tucky has a vasit number of both in all walks of life 
and in all states and sections of the world. 

I conitend that we need much more of these same 
programs. True, more programs in a lot of our schools, 
and less emphasis on possibly one or two phases of 
the present program, but certainly we do not need to 
legislate or curtail any program, curricular or extra- 
curricular, that provides a very definite part of the 
training that is needed to compete successfully in our 
present economic system. 

Maybe we do need to train more doctors, scientists, 
and mathematicians in order to keep up with our 
present growth and development, and to enable us to 
retain our position as number one nation of the world 
and to provide more leadership in constantly growing 
populations, but let's not overlook the fact that about 
one fourth to one half of our present employment is in 
the fields of providing directly or indirectly enter- 
tainment, pleasure, and worthwhile leisure activities 
for the whole population. 

No — let's not go off the deep end with crash pro- 
grams, changing the many things that now make 
school interesting, alive, and worthwhOe to all of the 
persons who are in school and many others who sup- 
port them. 

Yes, control over — emphasis in any phase of the 
school program where it is definitely over-emphasized, 
but let's not interefere with the school program by 
saying that music programs, F.H.A. programs, career 
days, clean-up days, science fairs, speech festivals, 
and the many other extra-curricular activities includ- 
ing the often criticized athletic programs must be 
curtailed. 

As a person who has been associated with schools 
in many capacities for the past thirty years, I feel 
fully qualified to stand up for the many phases of any 
good, well-rounded school program. It is the very life 
blood, not only of a good school system, but also of 
every community. 

Instead of curtailing these aotivities, actually insist 
on many more of them. Legislate if you must, but 
legislate to compel school systems to provide more, not 
less of these aotivities. 

The solution to the problem, why not do it this way! 

If these worthwhile activities are detracting from 

the present school program, and the so-called more 

important academic time is being lost, just do two 

things in Kentucky: 

(1) Increase the total school year from the present 
nine and one quarter months term to a full ten and 
one half or eleven months term or whatever amount 
of time that might be necessary to make up the few 
minutes that are lost each day in schools operating 
the present program. Buildings, teachers, and students 
do not need three full months vacation. That's the real 
economic loss in the opei-ation of the schools, not the 
extra-curricular time. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1962 



(2) Second, provide more money for education, in 
order that more and better teachers can be employed 
and then specialists can be used in all fields of educa- 
tion. 

I would like to urge the people who know our 
educational problems and our needs to write members 
of the State Board and members of the Commission on 
Piiblic Education urging them to study carefully these 
needs before taking action towards hasty legislation. 



SHOCKER ROOMS 

(Continued from Page Five) 
so-called 6 in 1 system. This simply means 
that there is one large locker for street cloth- 
es (approximately 12" (X) 12" (X) 72") 
and six storage lockers (9" (X) 12" (X) 24") 
for gym clothes. This comprises one unit. The 
numiber of lockers needed for the above area 
would be determined by the following for- 
mula: Number of locker units needed is 300 
plus 30 divided by 6 or 55 units each for boys 
and girls. 

This arrangement would provide for the 
accommodation of the largest class of 55 
students (one large locker for street clothes) 
in each boys' and girls' dressing room and 
330 storage lockers for gym clothes in each 
dressing room. 
Dressing Rooms for Athletics 

In addition to the physical education and 
intramural dressing rooms, as stated above, 
at least one team room should be provided 
for boys' athletics. This area should be large 
enough to house the greatest number of 
athletes competing at one time for the vari- 
ous teams. Each one should have full-length 
(12" (X) 12" (X) 72") lockers. Some schools 
prefer the open locker-room in which the 
athletes hang their equipment in stalls or on 
pegs and specially designed hangers. This 
system is usually satisfactory only when in- 
dividual rooms can be provided for each 
sport. Often the team room must be so situ- 
ated that the shower room used for the 
physical education classes can be utilized. 

A similar dressing room with fewer lock- 
ers (usually not more than 40) for visiting 
teams should be provided. The visiting team 
room cannot be successfully located in the 
girls' section of dressing rooms. It is best 
situated so that it can be used for boys' in- 
tramural or gym classes. 

A separate dressing and shower room for 
officials should be provided. Often this can 
be adjacent to the coach's office and used 
by him and the members of the physical 
education staff at all other times. 
Showers 

There should be a shower head for every 
four users at a class hour. This means that 
the above hypothetical school would have 13 



or 14 shower heads in each shower-room 
(for boys and girls). The shower heads 
should be at least 4 feet apart and have 9 
to 12 square feet of space provided for each 
shower. This would require a room of ap- 
proximately 168 square feet for 14 shower 
heads. If a separate classroom is provided 
for athletics, the number of showers needed 
should be estimated upon the same basis. 
Toweling Rooms 

It is most desirable to have a body-dry- 
ing area at the entrance to all locker rooms. 
It should be approximately the same area as 
the shower-room. This room could have a 
low wall (about 6') between it and the dress- 
ing room. 

RESOURCE MATERIALS 

The Athletic Institute, Planning Facilit- 
ies for Health, Physical Education and Rec- 
reation, by Participants in National Facilit- 
ies Conference, Revised Edition, 1956 Ad- 
dress: 209 S. State St., Chicago 4, 111. 

Gabrielson, M. Alexander, and Miles, Cas- 
well M., Sports and Recreation Facilities for 
School and Community, Englewood Cliffs, N. 
J., Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1958 and any text on 
the Administration of Physical Education 
and Athletics. 



Cavana Award To Highlands 

The Highlands High School of Fort 
Thomas is the first recipient of the M. J. 
Cavana Memorial Award which is given for 
advancement and achievement in swimming. 
Schools competing for the award were grad- 
ed on five points: (1) number of pupils who 
can swim 45 feet in deep water, (2) pupils 
acquiring proficiency in styles, (3) pupils 
with life saving certificates, (4) having 
swim teams, and (5) entering teams in the 
State Swimming Meet. Under the first three 
items, schools are judged on the percentage 
of pupils involved. The Seneca High School 
and the Fort Knox High School tied for sec- 
ond place in the contest. 



Correction 

Because of a clerical mistake the name of 
William R. (Bob) Foster was omitted from 
the list of highest rated State Tournament 
basketball officials which appeared in the 
April issue of the ATHLETE. Mr. Foster 
received votes from five of the schools which 
had teams in the tournament, his total points 
being 23. This gave him eleventh position in 
the voting. 



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